High Andean Wetlands Regional Initiative and High Andean Flamingos - Synergies of the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands and the Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals

High Andean Wetlands Regional Initiative and High Andean Flamingos - Synergies of the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands and the Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals

30 October 2017

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Panel speakers (L-R): Jessica Gálvez-Durand, National Forest and Wildlife Service, Peru; Teresa Pérez Chávez; Ministry of Environment and Water, Bolivia; Borja Heredia, CMS Secretariat; María Rivera, Ramsar Secretariat; and Santiago D’Alessio, Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development, Argentina

Coverage of the Side Event "Follow-up to the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity beyond 2020" at the 12th Session of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals (CMS COP12)

Presented by Ramsar Secretariat and CMS Secretariat

The event organized by Secretariats of the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands and the Convention on Migratory Species of Wild Animals (CMS) and was moderated by Santiago D’Alessio, Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development, Argentina.

The event focused on connection between the High Andean Wetlands Ramsar Regional Initiative and the Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) on the Conservation of High Andean Flamingos and their Habitats as a mechanism for increased synergies under the Ramsar and CMS conventions to enhance conservation efforts for both habitats and species.

Teresa Pérez Chávez, Ministry of Environment and Water, Bolivia, highlighted: deepening and streamlining initiatives to strengthen conservation of important wetlands; the importance of evaluations, characterization studies and monitoring; and concrete measures for joint work between the conventions based on the Action Plan of the High Andean Regional Initiative.

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Maria Rivera, Ramsar Secretariat, noted that CMS and Ramsar Conventions share many of the same focal points.

Jessica Gálvez-Durand, National Forest and Wildlife Service, Peru, emphasized: threats to wetlands, including contamination; work in her country in zones that currently lack protection; and potential synergies between CMS and Ramsar to address companies that don’t support conservation initiatives.

María Rivera, Ramsar Secretariat, identified potential opportunities for increased synergy, including: overlap in reporting mechanisms, such as national reports; information gleaned from designating wetlands of international  importance-Ramsar Sites; synchronizing updates to Appendices of CMS that have relevance to Ramsar sites; and regional processes such as Ramsar regional initiatives.

Borja Heredia, CMS Secretariat, focused on: the joint programme of work; the need to address threats to wetlands, including agriculture, mining, unregulated tourism, and climate change; and the value gained from exchanges of experience between the two conventions.

During the discussion, participants considered: threats from invasive species; helping local communities understand that wetlands are a source of life; and the need for scientific tools to conserve wetlands and for technical assistance.