The Convention’s CEPA Programme

29/05/2002

Malheureusement, il n'y a pas de version française de ce document.

Hungary's National CEPA strategy


australia.gif (2553 bytes)

National strategy for Communication, Education and Public Awareness (CEPA) in support of wetland conservation in Hungary

Table of contents

Outline
Authors and Sources
Legal situation
Uses of Hungarian Wetlands
Stakeholders
Issues
Communication needs
Communication objectives
Communication instruments
Funding
Communication strategy: National level
Communication strategy: Local level
ANNEX I: Utilisation types of wetlands of international importance of Hungary
ANNEX II:Checklist target group
ANNEX III: Issues
ANNEX IV: Excerpt from Additional Guidance on CEPA
ANNEX V: Checklist Logical Framework
ANNEX VI: Checklist for communication means and instruments
ANNEX VII: Tatai Öreg-tó Communication Program


Outline

Under resolution VII.9 of the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands' Outreach Programme, each contracting country is required to prepare a national strategy for Communication, Education and Public Awareness (CEPA) in support of wetland conservation. Hungary is a Contracting Party to the Convention (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) and has inscribed 21 wetlands in the country on the Ramsar list of internationally important wetlands. The government recognises that conservationists and users of wetlands in principle have many stakes in common, but that conflicts often arise when objectives are contradicting, differently perceived or not clearly communicated. This CEPA will serve as guidelines for government and non-government institutions active in the field of wetland conservation. It is aimed at making use of existing lines and channels of communication as much as possible. It will help them identify the different perceptions that different stakeholders can have of wetland issues, and subsequently provide options to intervene at national and at local level.

This presents two overall goals of this document:

At national level, the CEPA is aimed at providing the national policy makers with guidelines on how to communicate policy changes to the park managers and principal users.

At local level, the document should provide those responsible for implementing wetland policies with concrete options for strategizing and implementing communication campaigns targeting segmented stakeholder groups.

The CEPA has been developed as an output of the third phase of the Building Capacity for Effective Communication for Biodiversity project, implemented by IUCN as part of the Pan-European Biodiversity and Landscape Diversity Strategy (PEBLDS). The document works through the following steps:

· Wetland uses - how are the Hungarian wetlands used?
· Stakeholders in wetland conservation - which groups have an interest in wetlands in Hungary, and for what reasons?
· Wetland issues - what is at stake in Hungarian wetland conservation?
· Communication needs - how could communication be used as a tool to solve these issues?
· Communication objectives - what should be achieved at national and at local level?
· Communication capacity - how much skill, knowledge, manpower and budget is the currently available capacity, and how much would be needed? Which materials are available and which need to be developed?
· Communication strategy - based on the former, which activities need to be undertaken to reach this CEPA's communications objectives? A national and a local strategy will be presented
· Annexes - providing additional guidelines for the implementation of the CEPA

At one Hungarian Ramsar site, the Old lake at Tata, a local communication strategy has been developed under the IUCN/PEBLDS III project, to serve as an example of the use of communication in site-level wetland management. The strategy is currently being implemented and has been attached to this document (Annex VII).

Authors and Sources

The administrative authority responsible for the implementation of the Convention in Hungary, the Authority for Nature Conservation of the Ministry of Environment, has drafted this plan for communication and awareness raising. The national park directorates of Hungary have commented the draft, as well as the major non-governmental organisations working on wetlands under the framework of a Tempus project entitled EU training for nature conservation officials in November, 2000. These include WWF Hungary, Birdlife Hungary, and others.

Subsequently, the Effective Communication for Biodiversity Conservation project of the PEBLDS Phase III of IUCN has been focusing on this programme and activities have been carried out in three levels in the country. These were at local, regional and national levels. At local level, a communication strategy was developed and implemented at the lake Tata Ramsar site. At regional level a workshop was held in November, 2001, where actual management problems of Ramsar sites and other wetlands that could be solved by improving the existing communication practise were discussed. At national level, the draft CEPA strategy was elaborated and refined. The National Ramsar Committee (involving representatives of all relevant ministries and major stakeholder groups) discussed the plan and approved it in late 2001.

Legal situation

Although a single comprehensive wetland policy or strategy has not been prepared for the country, nature conservation and other environment-related legislation and national programmes do include the conservation concept of wetlands. The Act on Nature Conservation No. LIII of 1996 defines the general regulations related to wetlands. Furthermore, the National Biodiversity Strategy and Action Plan will include a chapter on wetlands prepared by the Planning Team on Inland Water and Freshwater Resources Management. It is expected to be approved by the Hungarian Parliament.

Uses of Hungarian Wetlands

Different groups in society use wetlands in Hungary for different purposes. The National Authority for Nature Conservation of the Ministry of Environment has made an inventory of the type and extent of uses of the 21 Hungarian wetlands that are listed under the Ramsar convention. This inventory can be found in Annex I. In total 8 types of use have been identified with various intensities depending on the specialities of the sites. The most commonly applied types of use are agriculture and eco-tourism. Research is also a common use, however, its impact on the ecological character is not significant. Agriculture is applied in extensive ways only. Eco-tourism is more intensive, though under supervision of national park directorates. Sites with the largest number of use types are Biharugrai TK, Kis-Balaton, Rétszilasi-tavak TT, Fertö, Béda-Karapancsa, Gemenc and Hortobágy. Half of them are man-made wetlands, such as fishponds or water reservoirs (like Kis-Balaton) and the rest are large, complex areas where many land use types have been carried out for a long period (see Annex I)

Stakeholders

Wetlands are complex ecosystems in which many groups of the society have a stake. The interests in a wetland can be shared, but the reason behind this interest and therefore the perception of the use of this wetland can differ widely. Also the ideas on how to approach or solve wetland issues can therefore be perceived differently. Stakeholders are those groups or people that can have direct and indirect impact on wetlands, either by being decision makers or (end) users. They can also be the target groups of this plan, but may not necessarily be so, for example when intermediaries are targeted to reach ultimate stakeholders. A guide to stakeholder identification can be found in Annex II. The following stakeholders can be identified in relation to wetlands in Hungary:

At national level

Ministry of Environment
National Authority for Nature Conservation
Ministries of Economy (Tourism), Interior, Education, Water Management and Agriculture & Rural Development
National Ramsar Committee
Large NGO's (Birdlife Hungary, WWF Hungary, Göncöl Alliance and others)

At local/regional level

Local Government Units
Wetland managers: these differ per wetland and can be National Park Authorities, water management Authorities or private landowners
NGO's
Businesses and industries
Associations of users (fishermen, farmers, anglers, hunters, tourism agencies)
Local subsistence users (farmers, fishermen)
Visitors (tourists, birdwatchers, sportsmen)

Issues

Before any communication plan for wetlands can be prepared, be it at national or local level, a clear understanding of the wetland issues in social, political, economic and environmental terms, terms that make the issues relevant to people, should be reached. The above has made clear that wetlands in Hungary are being used by different stakeholders for different purposes. This variety of interests creates conflicting situations resulting in issues that need to be clearly communicated in order to be solved. The table in Annex III contains an inventory of the main issues in Hungary that may or may not be applicable to individual Ramsar sites.

Issues can be analysed in order to understand their perception by different stakeholders. The Ramsar Bureau has developed guidelines for such analysis (available on the website and in part in Annex IV). Below an example is provided as to how such analysis can be applied to wetland issues.

Wetland issue: Agricultural intensification leading to deterioration of water quality

Stakeholder

Stake

Perceived issue

Sphere of solution

Site managers

Responsibility to maintain the ecological character of the wetland

Nutrient-rich water threatens the ecosystem
Alternative ways for water supply

Ecological

Farmers

Interested in fertilising the land

Alternative fertiliser to be used in larger scale not an option

Social/Economic

Fishermen

Yield of fish as large as possible

Nutrient-rich water can even have a positive impact on fishponds

Economic

Tourist operators

To attract as many visitors

Fewer visitors can have an impact on livelihood

Economic

Local business people

To maintain their activities

Bad water quality may have an adverse impact on livelihood

Economic

Local government

Tourists contribute to the welfare of local community

Visitors need to be attracted by leisure activities in a healthy climate (swimming, water sports, etc.)

Social/Economic

Communication needs

Because of the multi-stakeholder situation in Hungarian wetland management, the problems are complex and needs are diverse. Communication is needed to make wetland managers understand the different interests that are at stake, when dealing with issues like loss and degradation of Hungarian wetland areas, functions and benefits provided by wetlands for the well-being of the population and measures to conserve or restore these sensitive habitats at national and international levels. One thing that all stakeholders have in common is their need of a clean and healthy functional wetland, which can be used for the diverse purposes that each one of them has in mind. Communication could make this mutual interest into a common objective, so that wetland management could become a joint and sustainable effort.

Another communication issue is the lack of clear guidance in wetland management from national level. Wetland policies are under development as part of the National Biodiversity Strategy and Action Plan since 1999, but these have not yet been approved by the Parliament. At site level, this creates a vacuum where managers lack guidance in the implementation of ecologically, economically and socially sustainable management measures.

Loss and degradation of wetlands

The message should be formulated on the fact that nowadays only an estimated 2-3 % of the country is covered by wetlands, which is less than one-tenth compared to the former state (before river regulation works). These areas are the remnants of the former state still holding numerous species of international importance and providing vital functions for not only the ecosystem itself but to human populations. Many of them are unique hence their conservation is our national responsibility.

Benefits and profit provided by wetlands

In the long term wetlands can provide much more benefit than any type of land use. Their conversion into other types of land use (e.g. draining, intensification) results in loss of functions, roles played by wetlands in ecosystems and in loss of many species. Users and other stakeholders are not aware of the long-term impact this will have on their livelihood and existence.

Measures to conserve these habitats

There are many international obligations and commitments of the country as well as there is our internal legislation that collectively stand for the conservation of wetlands for future generations.

Communication objectives

National level

With the help of the communication strategy as a guiding tool, the national stakeholders are expected:

§ to provide national focus,
§ to develop networks at national and intermediary level,
§ to develop policies and guidelines on how to communicate these for local level use

Local level

At local level, the objectives of the strategy are such that with the document as a guiding tool, local stakeholders can and will:

§ provide local focus,
§ develop local networks,
§ implement policies and guidelines,
§ develop strategies and tools tailored for local use

The two levels would be linked through the networks as the following diagram shows:

Communication instruments

When strategizing the steps to be taken to support wetland conservation through sound communication, a wide array of communication instruments and materials can be used to achieve the identified communication objectives. Roughly, these instruments can be divided into interpersonal media, audio-visual instruments, printed materials and others, including virtual media. A brief assessment of possible communication instruments is presented in Annex VI, including an evaluation of their effectiveness and availability in Hungary. This is not an exhaustive list, but suits to guide planners and managers in strategizing their communication approaches.

A tool for communication planning, the logical framework approach, can be found in Annex V.

Funding

Funds have been derived from the Ministry of Environment and local governments, and internationally from IUCN/PEBLDS III (for the development of this strategy, posters and brochure), TEMPUS (education toolkit). Additional sources could be the Central Environmental Fund of Hungary, Ministry of Education, Ministry of Environment, NGO's, and international support.

Communication strategy: National level

National Communication Objective 1:

The national stakeholders are expected to provide national focus

Situation

Direction in wetland management at national level is lacking. The National Biodiversity Strategy and Action Plan drafted in 1999 lacks a chapter on national wetland management. As a result, the document was not approved and wetland management at national level and, consequently at site level, lacks focus and direction.

Responsible stakeholder

The Ministry of Environment, The National Authority for Nature Conservation, The Ramsar National Committee

Target group(s)

Other departments within the Ministry of Environment, other Ministries (Economy (tourism), Water Management, Agriculture & Rural Development, Education, and others), national tourism and business organisations, national media, wetland managers, general public

Objectives

- To create support for wetland management among the entire national government

- To involve and make allies of national tourism and business organisations

- To put wetland conservation on the agenda of decision makers, users and media

- To raise a general sense of appreciation for and understanding of the importance of wetlands among Hungarian citizens

Approaches

By providing guidance and formulating policies, the national authorities can assist the implementers at site level. They can create support from other government agencies and business organisations by regularly informing them about issues and developments in wetlands managements, and involve these stakeholders in the process. They have the position to enhance awareness among the general public because of the access they have to nationwide communication channels and media. In order to do so, this CEPA is developed to guide the responsible players through this process.

Instruments & Materials

Interpersonal

  • Nationwide organisation of the annual World Wetland Day and other environmental days

Audiovisual

  • Regular provision of information to journalists and editors of television and radio programmes
  • Development of a series of 2-minute radio announcements in popular style

Print

  • A newsletter (one page, print or electronic) to circulate among the different department and government agencies and business organisations at national and regional level providing information on the latest developments in wetlands management, new policies formulated, new achievements and updates, including the work of the National Ramsar Committee
  • A poster for the general public on the Hungarian implementation of the Ramsar convention, to be distributed at departments and relevant public places
  • A brochure on the Convention
  • Distribution among wetland managers, experts, government bodies of the Ramsar Convention Manual in Hungarian (published in 2000)
  • A book on Hungarian Ramsar sites for the general public
  • Education toolkit on wetlands for universities and colleges (will be published in early 2002 under TEMPUS)
  • Contact NGO specialised in Environmental Education, educational materials for primary and secondary schools

Other

  • Creation of an internet website on Hungarian wetlands/Ramsar and with links to local websites, the site of the Ramsar Bureau, and others (www.wetlandsinhungary.hu)

 

National Communication Objective 2:

The national stakeholders are expected to develop networks at national and intermediary level

Situation

Channels to communicate policies and guidelines to and from stakeholders to policy and decision-makers are unclear or non-existent. There is a pressing need to establish such lines to enable information transfer and alliance building. Because of limited time and manpower, such network should be efficient and fast.

Responsible stakeholder

National Authority for Nature Conservation, Ministry of Environment

Target group(s)

The NANC, Wetland managers, Cooperatives, Associations, NGOs and other intermediaries

Objectives

- to establish a network of communicators at national and intermediary level

- to establish an online information transfer between the Ministry and the regional network members

- to develop a strategy to work with NGOs dealing with wetlands

Communication issues

Although NGOs active in nature conservation usually have the same ultimate goals as the NANC, they often have different interests in and views about wetland issues and the approaches that should be taken.

Approaches

Given the limitations in finances and manpower available to government level communication managers, it is important that they have easy and regular access to their counterparts and target groups at regional level through the establishment of a national network of communicators in wetland management. This would allow efficient planning and a reduction of contacts with end users, saving considerable time and financial resources.

The basis of such network already exists in the form of the Ramsar National Committee, which could be extended to include representatives of all stakeholders. NGO’s and other civil groups should become full members of this network and be consulted and involved in planning processes in order to settle differences in view and approach.

Instruments & Materials

Interpersonal

  • Establishment/reformulation of a national network for wetland management, with representatives from all major stakeholders at national and regional level
  • An annual planning and evaluation workshop on communication in support of wetland management in Hungary
  • Semi-annual network meetings
  • Regular (informal) telephone contacts between the members of the network

Print

  • A regularly updated database of members, their contact persons and full contact details
  • Semi-annual reports (fixed format) from the regional members to update the NANC on developments
  • The newsletter proposed under objective 1 (one page, print or electronic) to circulate among the network members at national and regional level providing information on the latest developments in wetlands management, new policies formulated, new achievements and updates with inputs from the quarterly reports

Other

  • Creation of an internet website on Hungarian wetlands/Ramsar and with links to local websites, the site of the Ramsar Bureau, and others (see objective 1)
  • Education programme for wetland managers
  • Financial support to education programmes of NGOs

 

National Communication Objective 3:

The national stakeholders are expected to develop policies and guidelines on how to communicate these for local level use

Situation

No national policy on wetland management exist. These need to be developed, and consequently guidelines are needed to direct implementers at site level on how to communicate these policies to different stakeholders with different interests as successfully as possible.

Responsible stakeholder

National Authority for Nature Conservation, Ministry of Environment,

Target group(s)

Wetland managers, Local governments, Landowners, End users (visitors, schoolchildren etc.)

Objectives

- to develop national policies for wetland management

- to define a common national communication approach in wetland management

- to assist local wetland managers and interest groups in developing communication strategies and annual plans by preparing guidelines

Approaches

In order for wetland managers and local governments to be able to manage wetlands in an internationally acceptable and ecologically, economically and socially sustainable way, the national government should develop clear policies and guidelines. These have been formulated as a chapter under the National Biodiversity Strategy and Action Plan, but have not been adopted at this stage, creating confusion and opportunities for certain stakes to be more prominently defended than others, often at the cost of the natural resource base and biological diversity of wetlands. Secondly, local implementers should be guided in using communication to bring the complex of stakeholders on one line.

Instruments & Materials

Interpersonal

  • Interdepartmental meeting at the Ministry of Environment to discuss the issues concerning wetland policy development
  • National workshop on Communication in support of wetland conservation, with participants from all wetlands and concerned government agencies and NGO’s (implemented in November 2001 by IUCN/PEBLDS III)

Print

  • A chapter in the National Biodiversity Strategy and Action Plan specifically on wetlands and wetlands management, including a paragraph on the need for multi-stakeholder approaches and communication (under development)
  • A Communication, Education and Public Awareness (CEPA) strategy and action plan containing guidelines on how to use communication (this document)
  • A policy making implementation of this CEPA obligatory, including the establishment of a local network as a responsibility of the wetland managers


Communication strategy: Local level

Local Communication Objective 1:

The local stakeholders are expected to provide focus to local wetland management

Situation

As a consequence of the absence of national focus, wetland management at site level also misses direction. However, the stakes are higher and more pressing at local level as wetland issues affect the local stakeholders more directly and more regularly. In order to regulate interventions in wetlands, policies and legislation should be available at local government level.

Responsible stakeholder(s)

Wetland managers, Local Governments (Environmental Officers), NGOs

Target group(s)

Wetland managers, Local Governments (Environmental Officers), NGOs

Objectives

- to develop a short- and long-term vision on multi-stakeholder wetland management

- to have this vision included in local legislation such as municipal ordinances

- to prepare strategic plans and policies to facilitate implementation of the legislation

- to communicate these policies and regulations to create understanding and active support

Communication issues

In many of the Hungarian Ramsar sites, the different stakeholders are not actively cooperating in wetland management and do not have an understanding of the different stakes. Therefore it is often not realised that these could be reconciliated in support of a common objective: an ecologically and economically healthy wetland.

Approaches

Local stakeholders will be actively involved in the formulation of short- and long-term visions, objectives and interventions on local wetland management respecting the diversity of stakes in wetland management. The responsible local government unit (municipality or county) will translate these into ordinances and wetland managers will be urged to prepare annual plans and reports to encourage transparency. Participation of stakeholders in an early stage will enhance a feeling of ownership and chances for success.

Instruments & Materials

Interpersonal

  • Focus group discussion and workshop with all local groups with a stake in the wetland, in order to develop a common wetland management strategy
  • Regular contacts/presentations to local media to inform them and enhance their support
  • Presentations/talks during all public events (festivals, fora)
  • Coordinate with the local branches of the Ministry of Education on inclusion of wetlands as a topic in formal curricula of schools, and on training for teachers

Audiovisual

  • Regular provision of information to journalists and editors of local television and radio programmes
  • Development of series of 2-minute radio announcements in a popular style
  • Development of a video film on the local wetland: features, functions, threats, opportunities, management measures and future options. Short version (for regional TV) and longer version (for film showing at events or schools). An example is the project in Tata

Print

  • Municipal ordinances or county-level legislation on wetland management
  • A periodical information bulletin informing all local stakeholders on the latest developments
  • Annual reports available to public or any interested party
  • A brochure on the local wetland: features, functions, threats, opportunities, management measures and future options
  • A poster featuring the most striking characteristics (from different perceptions!) of the wetland
  • Educational inputs to instruction materials used in primary and secondary schools

Other

  • Creation of an internet website

 

Local Communication Objective 2:

The local stakeholders are expected to develop local networks

Situation

The different stakeholders at site level are not aware or willing to take into account each other’s current and future interests in wetlands. One reason is the lack of venue to reach consensus or common approaches on how to deal with wetland issues.

Responsible stakeholder

Wetland managers

Target group(s)

Representatives of all major local stakeholders

Objectives

- To establish a permanent venue for exchange of ideas and interests

- To increase awareness of different perceptions of wetland issues in a multi-stakeholder situation

- To enhance mutual understanding and to reach consensus on approaches in wetland management acceptable if not beneficial to all stakeholders

Approaches

A network of representatives of groups with a stake in the management of the local wetland

Instruments & Materials

Interpersonal

  • Establishment of a local network for wetland management, with representatives from all major stakeholders
  • Election of a representative of the local network to attend the national network
  • Annual planning and evaluation workshop on communication in support of management of the local wetland site
  • Semi-annual network meetings, preceded by national level meetings
  • Regular (informal) telephone contacts between the members of the network
  • Focus group discussions on (for example) wetland issues, stakeholders and perceptions
  • Cross-visits to other wetland areas
  • Twinning with other wetland sites in Hungary or internationally

Print

  • A regularly updated database of members, their contact persons and full contact details
  • Annual strategy and action plan
  • Semi-annual reports (fixed format) from regional members to update the NANC on developments, to be submitted prior to the national network meeting

Other

  • Creation of an internet website with links to the national site

 

Local Communication Objective 3:

The local stakeholders are expected to implement policies and guidelines

Situation

As no final policies and only general guidelines have been developed at national level, local governments and wetland managers have difficulties in practising sustainable wetland management. Once national policies have been formulated, local managers are to be assisted in implementing them. This will involve communication in order to create a united approach among the diverse stakeholders.

Responsible stakeholder

Wetland managers

Target group(s)

Wetland managers, users of the local wetland

Objectives

- to ensure that nationally developed policies and guidelines are implemented at site level

- to ensure that the need and rationale for the policies are understood and supported

Approaches

Regular information flow is needed to ensure that all relevant stakeholders are continuously up to date with recent developments in national policy formulation in relation to wetland management. To ensure acceptance, support and active implementation of the policies, awareness raising is a crucial part of achieving the objectives.

Instruments & Materials

Interpersonal

  • Focus group discussion and workshop with all local groups with a stake in the wetland, in order to develop a common wetland management strategy (as for local objective 1)
  • Stakeholder consultations whenever new policies have been formulated
  • Establishment of volunteer (youth) networks & lobby groups as a platform to advocate wetland conservation

Audiovisual

  • Regular provision of information to journalists and editors of local television and radio programmes
  • Development of a series of 2-minute radio announcements in a popular style
  • Development of a video film on the local wetland: features, functions, threats, opportunities, management measures and future options. Short version (for regional TV) and longer version (for film showing at events or schools).

Print

  • Mailing to stakeholders whenever new policies have been formulated
  • A brochure on the local wetland: features, functions, threats, opportunities, management measures and future options
  • A poster featuring the most striking characteristics (from different perceptions!) of the wetland
  • Educational inputs to instruction materials used in primary and secondary schools

Other

  • Financial support to environmental education programmes of NGO’s and schools

 

Local Communication Objective 4:

The local stakeholders are expected to develop strategies and tools tailored for local use

Situation

The first three objectives all require communication approaches and activities in order to be achieved. Communication capacity in Hungary is considered low and not always sufficient. At local level, communities often develop several activities, but little strategic planning is involved. In order to ensure proper implementation of this CEPA at local level, guidelines on the use of communication are needed.

Responsible stakeholder

The National Authority for Nature Conservation (NANC) of the Ministry of Environment, and the National Ramsar Committee

Target group(s)

All local stakeholders in wetland

Objectives

- To ensure that strategies are developed by the target groups

- To ensure implementation of this national strategy for communication at national and at local level

- To build communication capacity among wetland managers and policy makers in governments and NGO’s, at national as well as site level

Approaches

The current document is the main step in this direction. It will serve as a set of guidelines to local wetland managers and other stakeholders by providing an overview of communication strategizing and planning. This will be discussed with all stakeholders before it will be finalised to be presented at the international IUCN workshop on Building Capacity for Communication in Bratislava, in November 2001.

Instruments & Materials

Interpersonal

  • Regional meeting for wetland managers on Communication in support of Wetland Management in Hungary, November 12-13, 2001, at Lake Tata, a Ramsar site. The meeting included presentation and discussion of this CEPA, as well as workshops on Wetland issues, stakeholders and perceptions, and Communication planning
  • International IUCN workshop on Building Capacity for Communication in Bratislava, in November 2001. Five central European countries exchanged national experiences.

Print

  • Publication of National strategy for Communication, Education and Public Awareness (CEPA) in support of wetland conservation in Hungary (this document); distribution among all targeted stakeholders and interest groups
  • The CEPA will include the following guidelines:
    • Uses of wetlands in Hungary
    • Wetland issues in Hungary
    • Multi-stakeholder situations and perception of wetland issues
    • An inventory of possible communication instruments
    • A strategy for the use of communication in wetland management at national and at local level
    • Practical methods for implementing CEPA

Other

  • All contracting parties are encouraged to publish their national CEPA on the website of the Ramsar Bureau

ANNEX I

Utilisation types in wetlands of international importance of Hungary

Type of use

Ramsar Site

Fishery

Reedbed management

Agriculture

Forestry

Hunting

Tourism

Eco-tourism or Recreation

Research

1. Szaporcai Ó-Dráva meder

.

.

.

.

.

2.Dinnyési Fertö/ Velencei Madárrezervátum TT

.

.

.

3. Kardoskúti Fehértó TT

.

.

.

.

.

4. Mártélyi TK

.

.

.

5. Fels -Kiskunság alkaline ponds

.

.

.

6. Pusztaszeri TK

.

7. Hortobágy (4 different parts)

.

8. Kis-Balaton

.

9. Tatai Öreg-tó

.

.

.

10. Fertö

.

11. Balaton

.

.

12. Bodrogzug

13. Ócsai TK

.

14. Pacsmagi tavak TT

.

.

15. Rétszilasi tavak TT

.

.

16. Biharugrai TK

17. Gemenc

.

18. Béda-Karapancsa

.

.

19. Izsáki Kolon-tó

.

.

.

20. Ipoly Valley

.

.

21. Baradla

.

.

.

Note: TK means Landscape Protection Area and TT means Nature Reserve


ANNEX II

Checklist Target groups

Target group Analysis

Answer in relation to your issue the following questions:

1. Which groups of people are involved?
2. Which groups are instrumental to solve the issue?
3. Can we segment these groups to homogenous groups of people we can define easily?
4. What problems do arise from the issue per target group?
5. What has been done so far towards these target groups?
6. What has been their reaction?
7. What is their involvement in the issue?:
§ objective or subjective (personal)
§ high or low (interested, committed)
§ risk perception (money, reputation, status)
8. What do they know about the issue?
9. What is their perception of the issue?
10. What is their main attitude/wish/desire with regard to the issue?
11. What is their current behavior with regard to the issue?
12. What is an obstacle for them to think or act as we would like:
§ what are benefits for business as usual
§ what do they perceive as costs to change their attitude, knowledge, behavior
§ what would make them change their mind
13. What else do we know about the target group:
§ name & address data
§ demographical data
§ psycho-graphical data
§ lifestyle data
§ attitudinal data
§ cognitive data
14. Who is a credible sender for this target group:
§ which newspapers, magazines they read
§ who are their peers, bosses
§ which places do they frequent
§ to whom do they listen in general
§ how credible are we ourselves in the eyes of the target group


ANNEX III

Issues

Main wetland issues and consequences in different spheres in Hungary

Issue

Social consequences

Economic consequences

Political consequences

Environmental consequences

Basin/downstream character of Hungary

Dependency on neighbours: ability to conserve natural resources of wetlands depends on water quality coming from outside the country

Dependence on water resources rising in neighbouring states, possibly limiting future availability in Hungary

Good relation with neighbouring countries imperative in order to have integrated catchment approach in place

Environmental hazards

may take place, due to upstream interventions

Agricultural intensification

Less attention to natural environment

Agriculture important factor in Hungarian economy

Conflicts of interest between ministries on resources to introduce nature-friendly land uses

Deterioration of water quality; Loss of biological diversity

Intensification of transport on waterways

People and businesses become more mobile

Intensification of other forms of transport would be more costly

Challenge to find alternative ways of transport that are acceptable to all sectors

Degradation and fragmentation of habitats ;

Increased disturbance

Increasing number of visitors to wetlands

Awareness among stakeholders on natural values of these habitats

Source of income for communities, government and business sector

Attention for special sites (e.g. Balaton, Lake Tata etc.)

Adverse impact of mass tourism on wetlands


ANNEX IV

Excerpt from Additional Guidance on Reviewing and Action Planning for Wetland Communication, Education and Public Awareness (CEPA), as published on the website of the Ramsar bureau

What are the issues that CEPA can address?

The Ramsar Convention is founded on the belief that wetlands provide a wealth of goods and services that have sustained human populations throughout their history. Wetlands also contribute significantly to the maintenance of global biodiversity. Loss and degradation of wetlands reduces this wealth, negatively affecting the health and well-being of human society.

Two fundamental roles for CEPA in implementing the Convention are then:

(i) to raise awareness at all levels of society of the functions and values of wetlands to all people, and the cost to society of the loss and degradation of wetlands;

(ii) to use CEPA techniques as a means to resolving wetland problems that result in wetland loss and degradation at Ramsar and other wetland sites.

The following paragraphs and Boxes 1 and 2 illustrate how CEPA can address wetland issues with an example of the resolution of a wetland problem using CEPA techniques. The example demonstrates that the delivery of a wetland message through CEPA activities can be highly effective although it is a complex process involving a broad range of stakeholders and CEPA solutions. It demonstrates too that poorly conceived CEPA activities lead to failure. While this example is focussed on the resolution of a wetland problem through CEPA activities, rather than the effective delivery of a positive message about wetland functions and values, its message is the same for both approaches.

Box 1 Identifying the underlying issues

WETLAND ISSUE: Over-abstraction of water, leading to unacceptably low water levels and availability

Stakeholder

Their stake

Perceived issue

Sphere of solution

Site Manager

Responsibility to maintain populations of legally-protected species

Threat to protected wetland species

Ecological

Local people – group (a)

Depend directly on the water for domestic uses

Loss of availability of an essential resource

Social

Local people – group (b)

Do not depend on the wetland for their water

Irrelevant to them

Not applicable

Local craftspeople

Depend on the wetland plants for their craft materials

Threat to their income

Social and economic

Tourist operators

Depend on the landscape and wildlife qualities of the wetland for their tourism business

Threat to their livelihoods

Social and economic

Community workers

Interest in the health and welfare of local people

Reduced or lost incomes and reduced water quality will impact on the health and welfare of local people

Social

Local government

Responsible for the welfare of the community

Solutions to any problems will be expensive

Economic and political

 

BOX 2: Identifying the solutions

WETLAND ISSUE: Over-abstraction of water, leading to unacceptably low water levels and availability.

Stakeholder

Rationale for solution(s)

Solution(s)

Sphere of solution

Site Manager

Low water level increased pollutant concentration threat to protected fish species

Take action to protect species, for example:
  undertake scientific fieldwork
  begin public awareness programme
develop and implement a site water level management plan

Ecological or social

Tourist operators

Low water level unsightly location and reduced wildlife

Shift tourist operation to another location

Social and economic

Local government

 

 

 

Low water level location becomes unsightly and lacks resources, and so becomes less attractive to local people

Seek solutions to maintain the community at the location, for example:
address the on-site water levels
 address cause of the low water levels at a local or wider level
address the unsightliness
 address the tourism decline directly
 address the needs of the craftspeople

Economic and political

This simple analysis of a wetland issue highlights a number of important points of relevance to CEPA work. Most points are equally relevant to the challenge of delivering a positive message about the values and functions of wetlands:

· The problem (or symptom - here, unacceptably low water levels) may appear similar to a number of people, but the underlying issue (or cause) may be identified and understood very differently. It will be more effective to focus CEPA activity on the issue(s) than on the problems.

· The diverse backgrounds of the people delivering the CEPA message can affect their perceptions of the issue and solutions being addressed: are they social or ecological, economic or political? Are they focused primarily on the wise use of water or wetlands; on wildlife conservation or social development? Such different perceptions can cause confusion when deciding the direction and focus of the most appropriate CEPA input and its goals. Participative, open consideration of the issues will help clarify the purpose of CEPA.

· The issues, differently understood, give rise to different solutions, and the solutions are located within different operational spheres, for example, ecological, social or economic. This has implications for the most effective spheres, stakeholders, methods and messages for CEPA activities.

· There may be some convergence between perceptions of the issues (unsightliness), or between suggested solutions (address on-site water levels). Such agreement between different groups can be used to identify where and how CEPA might be applied most effectively and emphasises the need to bring together the many different stakeholders that have shared concerns.


ANNEX V

Checklist Logical Framework

A logical framework is a tool that helps managers in the planning of projects and activities. It is useful to gain insight in the project by defining verifiable indicators, which measure failure or success and as such help to monitor and evaluate the project effectively. It is very useful when planning communication intervention, but is also widely used for more technical nature management projects. A plan is nothing, planning is everything. A logical framework is a tool. It should not dominate the planning. Planners should be prepared to modify the intervention logic as various needs and ideas arise during the participatory planning process.

The framework consists of a matrix. This Annex explains the matrix and gives definitions of terms used. Before doing so, the different phases in the planning process are being discussed.

Phases Logical Framework Approach

ANALYSIS PHASE

PLANNING PHASE

  1. Problem analysis

Identifying key problems, constraints and opportunities; determining cause and effect relationships

4. Logframe

Defining the project structure, testing its internal logic and formulating objectives in measurable terms

2. Analysis of objectives

Developing objectives from the identified problems; identifying means to end the cause and effect relationships

5. Activity scheduling

Determining the sequence of activities; estimating duration, setting milestones and assigning responsibility

3. Strategy analysis

Identifying the different strategies to achieve the objectives; determining the overall objectives and project purpose

6. Input and cost scheduling

From the activity schedule, developing input schedules and a budget

 

  IMPLEMENTATION & EVALUATION PHASE

  In addition to its role during program and project preparation, the logical framework approach is also a key management tool during implementation and evaluation. It provides the basis for the preparation of action plans and the development of a monitoring system during the implementation, as well as a framework for evaluation.

Logical Framework matrix

The matrix that needs to be filled in when using the logical framework approach is designed as follows. Below the table, definitions of the terms used are given.

Overall Objectives

Objectively verifiable indicators

Sources of verification

.

Project Purpose

Objectively verifiable indicators

Sources of verification

Assumptions

Results or Outputs

Objectively verifiable indicators

Sources of verification

Assumptions

Activities

Means

Costs

Assumptions

.

.

.

Preconditions

Overall Objectives: The long term goals of the organization, of sustainable development, of biodiversity conservation, environmental protection etc. to which the project makes a contribution. Several projects may contribute to the same overall objective. Its attainment often takes longer than a single project's lifetime

Project Purpose: The specific objective of the project, i.e. the improved situation from the point of view of the beneficiaries; or the answer to the core problem.

Results or Outputs: The results or outputs arte derived from the objectives, which together lead to the project purpose. Results should be stated as an improved state of affairs such as adequate legal framework exists" or "peasants are planting trees". They may be for example: services and infrastructure delivered by the project and used by the beneficiaries. Results are not only physical outputs but a start to enjoyment of sustainable benefits.

Activities: Activities are specific tasks derived from the lower level objectives which combined produce the results. When the activities are carried out the means and inputs are transformed into results that together will achieve the project purpose.

Means: The means are human resources, equipments and material inputs require to carry out planned activities and manage the project. Means are first defined in general terms, and then later detailed in terms of quantity, quality and finance.

Objectively verifiable Indicators: Measurable indicators that will show whether or not objectives have been achieved at each level of the logframe hierarchy. These indicators provide an important basis for the design of an appropriate monitoring system.

Milestones: A type of objectively verifiable indicators providing indicators for short-term objectives, which facilitate the measurement of achievements throughout the project rather than just at the end. They also indicate times when decision can or should be made.

Means of verification: The means by which the indicators or milestones will be recorded and made available to project management or those evaluating project performance.

Risks, constraints and assumptions: External factors which could affect the progress or success of the project, but over which the project manager has no direct control.

Preconditions: Preconditions (if any) attached to the provision of aid, which must be met before the project can commence.

Factors ensuring sustainability: Factors that will determine whether project benefits continue after completion of the project.


ANNEX VI

Checklist for communication means and instruments

Interpersonal means

Instruments

Advantages

Disadvantages

Points to remember

Hungary

Public consultations and assemblies

Good venue for two-way communication. Reaches large and well-defined groups. Opportunity for stakeholders to voice opinions and ask questions.

Often too large-scale to reach common agreements. People sometimes afraid to speak in public. Time limitations and difficult when atmosphere is hostile

Often required by law with the purpose to involve stakeholders in planning process.

Required by law when designating a site as nature reserve or for management plans, or other large-scale decisions.

Meetings/discussions

Good venue for two-way communication; more suitable to reach consensus because of smaller groups.

Needs skilled facilitators or discussion leaders.

Informal process to explore a specific issue, involving different stakeholders on a basis of equality.

Commonly used in Hungary.

Focus group discussions

Good way to gain insight in issues and perceptions, and to stimulate involvement and active participation.

Careful preparation needed to guide the participants through the process.

Small group of stakeholders or citizens that can be used to assess reactions to plans. It has no formal advisory role.

.

Workshops

Good venue for two-way communication, to gain insight in issues and ideas, and to stimulate knowledge & skills development.

Good preparation and facilitation needed. Transparency needed throughout about purpose and actions with outcome.

This is an active instrument, which needs true participation of all involved.

Commonly used in Hungary.

Cross visits

Often very effective eye-opener making people aware of scale of issues, perceptions and options for solutions.

Can be expensive.

Visit to other site with similar management or communication issues. Very effective for wetland managers, intensive user groups

Common in Ramsar sites.

Excursions & site visits

Visit to the site under discussion.

Can be, but not necessarily, expensive.

Local youth, school classes, citizens

Commonly used in the country.

Environmental games and competitions

.

.

.

Common in Hungary.

Environmental theatre

Informal, playful, participatory: a very effective tool in raising understanding, awareness, support, although time consuming.

If done by community groups cheap, otherwise can be expensive. Needs considerable guidance.

.

Not common in Hungary.

Personal interviews

Very effective to obtain in-depth knowledge about issues and perceptions among different stakeholders.

Very time-consuming and costly.

Designing and conducting interviews is specialised task.

Commonly used in Hungary.

Telephone

Informal, direct and two-way contact, making it easily accessible to many people.

Can be costly and time-consuming.

Information numbers that people can ring to get information or give feedback. Service has to be made known.

.

Printed means

Instruments

Advantages

Disadvantages

Points to remember

Hungary

Letters

Personal mode of communication, relatively high chance of being noticed and read by intended target group (when personalised); mail-merge software makes it easier to send personalised letters to larger groups.

Unsuitable for very large groups.

Requires up to date database with names, addresses, etcetera.

Widely used means for communication

Annual report

Good opportunity to give information about organisation’s operations.

Can be quite costly and time consuming to produce and distribute; often lost in the flood of annual reports that is sent out every year; little chance of feedback

Often law requires an annual report. If you are making one anyway, it might as well be good!

Not so frequently used in Hungary and not considered as a communication channel

Brochures & Leaflets

Can reach large number of people; costs can be controlled – when produced in large number cost efficient, can be kept in store to answer questions.

Little chance of feedback; if distributed in the wrong way easily overlooked; mass distribution will result in high wastage, limited space to explain details.

Plan the distribution with care; always pre-test a draft with the target group to check if the message gets across.

Increasingly used method since the beginning of the nineties

Reports

Can present information in detail

Can easily be overlooked because of high number reports published; little feedback option.

Develop guidelines for level and tone of voice; lay out can attract attention, plan distribution and publicity well in time.

See annual report

Journals & Magazines

Good way to reach specialised audience; articles are usually printed without cost (free publicity).

Limited circulation, little feedback.

Keep lists of specialised journals and names, phone numbers of editors, built a relation with most important editors.

Generally there is good connection with journalists

Visual means

Instruments

Advantages

Disadvantages

Points to remember

Hungary

Visitor centre

Attractive way to present information; if staff available direct feed back opportunity; chance to appeal to all senses: strong impact.

Will not reach target groups that are not interested. Costly to built/rent and maintain.

How to attract the right target groups, how to ensure financial continuity.

A fairly good network of visitor centres is in place

Displays/ Exhibitions/ Posters

Attractive way to present information, if staff is present there is a direct feed back opportunity.

Can be costly.

Go for lightweight, portable and easily changeable systems; Don’t present too much information.

Becomes more and more popular in nature conservation

Slides

Attractive, eye catching, potential for strong impact. Useful support to other communication activities. Direct feedback often possible.

Needs special equipment and darkened room, slightly tricky in use.

Always test equipment beforehand.

Another widely used method in this regard

Overhead sheets

Cheap and easy to make, effective to support speeches.

Needs special equipment, tendency to put too much information on one slide.

Aim for no more than 5 lines with 5 words.

Commonly used in presentations

Film/video

Suitable to address groups of various sizes. Easy to transport and to reproduce. Different options for distribution.

Expensive to produce, needs professional skills, no feedback possible, difficult to change.

.

Good relations between nature conservation staff and film makers exist

Digital means

Instruments

Advantages

Disadvantages

Points to remember

Hungary

Websites

Attractive way to present high variety of information, feedback and interaction possible, relatively easy to up date, insight in number of users, potential to reach high number of people.

Not accessible for everyone, requires technical expertise

How to attract target groups to the website? Ensure linkages with popular target group sites and ensure high ranking with search engines.

The system is under development both in NGOs and governmental organisations

 

CD Roms

Suitable medium to present complex and high quantity of information, relatively cheap to reproduce, easy to distribute.

Requires special equipment to use, requires technical expertise to develop.

Check CD Rom use in target group first.

Although the number of PCs are increasing in public organisations, individuals have limited numbers of PCs

E-mail (-newsletter)

Effective medium to approach small and large number of people, cheap, fast, direct, possibility for feedback.

Difficult to stand out in large number of e-mails sent each day.

Necessary to attract attention right away. Be direct, avoid long messages.

The same as for the previous, which is a constraint

Mass Media

Instruments

Advantages

Disadvantages

Points to remember

Hungary

Radio broadcasts

High local interest; accessible for large audience, audience can be targeted, low production costs.

Contact does not mean communication, lacks personal appeal, scheduling can be problematic, no control over final message (dependant on editors and journalists).

Keep an updated list of media addresses and contact persons, follow up phone call increases chances of publication, maintain good relations with important editors.

Depends largely on the journalist who should be familiar with the issue

TV broadcasts

Potential for high impact, accessible for large audience, audience can be targeted.

With increasing number of channels more difficult to reach large audience, no control over final message (dependant on editors and journalists).

= do =

Difficult to access with this issue

Newspaper articles

Usually wide circulation; information can be distributed quickly.

No control over final message (dependant on editors and journalists).

= do =

Locally very important

Press conference

Chance to deliver more complex information to media; has opportunity for feedback.

Staff needs to be trained in media contact.

Requires careful preparation.

Commonly used for special occasions

Press releases

Cheap way to draw attention of media to newsworthy events; suitable for fairly straightforward issues; can be produced on short term.

Media receive large numbers of press releases; difficult to attract attention, requires writing skills, no direct feed back from journalists.

Keep an updated list of media addresses and contact persons, follow up phone call increases chances of publication, maintain good relations with important editors.

Commonly used, however as for radio broadcast, the journalists should be familiarised

(Adapted in cooperation with HECT Consultancies from ECNC, Communicating Nature Conservation 2000)


ANNEX VII

TATAI ÖREG-TÓ COMMUNICATION PROGRAM


April - December, 2001

CAMPAIGN PROGRAM

1. Context

Hungary is one of five Central European countries receiving support from the IUCN - World Conservation Union under the umbrella of the Pan-European Biodiversity and Landscape Strategies (PEBLDS) project. This long-term programme is aimed at strengthening the capacity of nature conservation organisations to develop and implement information and communication programmes to support nature conservation programmes in Central Europe. In Hungary an approach is chosen to work both at a national and a local level. Given the importance of wetlands in the country, support will be given to finalise a national Communication Education and Public Awareness (CEPA) strategy to support the development and implementation of the Hungarian Ramsar programme. Complementary to this national level, activities to support a local Ramsar site will be implemented at Lake Tata. This site has been chosen because of the unique circumstances (cultural & natural values, low level of protection and many stakeholder groups) and the practicality of the small size of the area. This document provides a communication strategy to support initiatives ensure preservation of the Lake Tata, maximizing sustainable development of the region to minimise negative impact in the site itself.

2. Tatai Oreg-To

The Old-Lake of Tata is situated in the north-western part of Hungary, at the meeting of the Minor Plain (Kisalföld) and the Transdanubian Hills (Dunántúli-Középhegység), 10 km from the Danube. The Old-Lake of Tata was created in the 14th century in a Pleistocene natural marsh. Its total surface area is now 220 hectares with a water capacity of 4,2 million m3. The main water supply of the lake is the brooklet Által-ér, and its catchment area covers 460 km2. Until the 1960's, Tata had been famous for a group of karstic springs mostly abounding in water in Hungary (more than 120,000 m3/day). These springs dried up owing to the continuous coal mining in the area for 100 years, but they have recently reappeared, because the mining was stopped. The Old-Lake of Tata is one of the biggest and oldest lakes of the Transdanubian Region (after Lake Balaton, Lake Ferto and Lake Velencei).

Importance

Lake Tata is a natural wetland of regional, national and international importance. Therefore, the wetland was included in the List of Wetlands of International Importance of the Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971) in 1989 with 269 hectares. The Old Lake is a wintering place of international significance for migrating waterfowl, especially wild geese. Ringing migratory waders and waterfowl showed intensive migration between the Dutch Lower-Rhine and Lake Tata. Regular ornithological data collection has been going on for as long as 20 years, and it is also a proposed SPA and NATURA 2000 site. It is one of the three most important areas in Hungary for Bean Goose (Anser fabalis). The area of the former moor-forests and marshes (and therefore the number of birds nesting here) decreased considerably in the 1970's, but owing to successful protection measures (e.g. application of strict conservation measures in the southern part of the lake) maintained its Central European significance in migration.

The lake is of outstanding importance at regional level as well. Beside its significance in nature conservation, the area is utilised for flood protection, tourism, water sports and fishery. The monumental, middle-aged town of Tata surrounds the wetland halfway, making the lake a crossroads for nature and culture. Number of overnights around Tata accommodations is around 20 000 yearly, furthermore additional 300 000 tourists visit the town, from which the majority also visit the lake. Among foreign visitors Germans, Dutch and Austrians are the most numerous.

The Commune of Tata declared the priority of ecological and nature conservation aspects in 1996, learning from the extreme environmental load of the previous years. A rehabilitation strategy and a management plan of the basin were prepared, as well as an initiative for governmental co-operation. The efforts needed to rehabilitate the lake are known, and a lot of plans and documents were prepared, but the project couldn't reach its realisation because of permanent lack of resources. This project is aiming at to raising awareness among stakeholders including decision-makers on the values and the significance of the wetland. By implementing this project, a better understanding of the wetland can be achieved in all levels of the local community.

Threats

Unfortunately, Lake Tata's natural state has significantly degraded in the past decades. Also the economic importance, especially related to tourism, decreased considerably due to water quality problems. Main threats towards the ecology of lake are agricultural and industrial impact on water quality, water management works, urbanisation and human disturbance. At former lake reconstructions in 1970 and 1987, ecological aspects were not taken into consideration, to the effect that the hair-weed vegetation was completely destroyed. In addition, most of the natural east shore was reconstructed with concrete in the 1970's. The lake was a famous swimming place till 1985; now swimming is prohibited due to water contamination. Although expansion of the important holiday resorts at the south shore are limited by the borders of the nature conservation area, the traffic is more and more intensive, and the lights of the city have a disturbing effect as well. During summer, swimmers, kayakers, wind-surfers, and people using pleasure boats create insufficient shelter for nesting birds. The disturbance is less in winter, but birds resting here are very sensitive due to low reed coverage.

Needs

There is a significant socio-economic need for the improvement of the ecological state of the lake. The water is not suitable for swimming since 1985, and this lead to a serious decline in tourism. To promote the rehabilitation, the town of Tata initiated an association for the whole catchment area, which now has 18 member settlements (160,000 people). The Old-Lake is the priority place of eco-tourism development in the county, but permanent eco-tourism can be reached only by improvement of the natural state of the lake. The ecological rehabilitation of the lake is the most important condition for the development of Tata. The region loses several millions of Euro per year due to bad water quality of the lake.

Ever since the lake became a nature conservation area and a Ramsar site, ecological aspects have been of significantly more importance. A very important fact is that certain areas where large hotels were planned to be build, have become strictly protected nature conservation areas. This fundamental change of attitude was not easy to reach, but now the leaders of the town and people living here find rehabilitation and conservation of water habitats more important than creating new buildings.

Significance of the project

The significance of the project lies in the practical intervention in harmony with the Ramsar Convention, as well as in the new perspectives, which it could create in the harmonized development of Tata and its surroundings. Through the project, a calmer and more natural water habitat can be created for plenty of thousands of wild geese, ducks, gulls and other water birds resting here for winter. Colonization of different plant and animal species as well as habitat development will be possible throughout the year. Through an enhanced awareness of the uniqueness and vulnerability of the Tata area, and a greater sense of ownership towards the future of Tata, the project hopes to generate sustainable wise use of it's natural resources among all target groups.

3. Communication strategy to support sustainable development of the area

Sustainable development of the region demands a basic concern of the importance of the area among users of the lake. Local use ranges from recreational purposes (children, local tourists) to economic (local business men), educational (schools) and subsistence purposes (fishermen); people from outside the region mainly use the Lake for recreation. National and international conservation groups recognize the biological value of the basin. This communication plan will provide support to the rehabilitation of the lake by strategising, step by step, the actions to be taken in order to achieve maximum effect.

Communication objectives

The overall objective of the communication programme is to create understanding and to ensure active support and participation to conservation and rehabilitation of Lake Tata basin. Through an enhanced awareness of the uniqueness and vulnerability of the Tata area, and a greater sense of ownership towards the future of Tata, the project hopes to generate sustainable wise use of it's natural resources among all target groups. All target groups will be furnished clear, recognisable information that provides them with links between their own social, cultural backgrounds and the future of Lake Tata. Partners at policy-making level (ministries, NGO's conservation) are to feel involved and committed to the conservation objectives.

Specific objectives are to:

· Enhance understanding and appreciation of the local community for the unique aspects and natural value of the site
· Inform other users about the importance of the area and provide them with rules and guidelines to enjoy the value of the area, minimising a negative impact.
· Raise awareness concerning the real values of the wetland that make a significant contribution to the welfare of local inhabitants
· Develop a sense of 'ownership' among large segments of the local population and create an interest to become partner in its conservation

Target group identification

The main groups that are to be reached with this communication strategy are:

· Local inhabitants of Tata
· Fishermen
· Children/Youth of Tata
· Primary & secondary schools
· Tourists from outside region (national, international)
· Local business men
· Decision makers

Messages

Message elements:

Targeted audiences:

"You all enjoy the beauty of Lake Tata"

Local inhabitants, youth, tourists

"Lake Tata is an area of outstanding biological importance"

Tourists, local inhabitants, youth

"Lake Tata has more geese than any other area in Europe"

Tourists

"Its natural value and beauty attracts visitors and is important for the development of Tata region. An estimated 60% of the income of Tata comes from activities related to the lake"

Local business men

"Preserving Lake Tata is preserving our future"

Local inhabitants, youth, business men

Means & Activities

In order to meet the specified communication objectives, some materials and media need to be developed or used. The following activities and means have been identified for this purpose:

A. Interpersonal media

Events

Targeted audiences

Sociological survey, before (May) and after (October) implementation of the strategy

All identified stakeholders are targeted

Water-Music-Flower Festival (June 28- July 1, 2001)

Children, local inhabitants, local business men, tourists (national & international)

Tata Fishermen’s Day Festival (October 28, 2001)

Fishermen, Children, local inhabitants, local business men, tourists (national)

Wild Geese Festival (December 6-9, 2001)

Local inhabitants, Children, local business men, tourists (national & international), Conservation groups, NGO’s, ministry reps.

B. Mass media

Planned

Targeted audiences

Newspaper: Komárom-Esztergom Megyei Hírlap (County daily news)

Local inhabitants, leaders of different user groups of Tata (authorities, business sector etc)

Newspaper: Komárom-Esztergom megyei 24 ÓRA (County daily news)

Local inhabitants, leaders of different user groups of Tata (authorities, business sector etc)

Television: 7 min film on regional Tatai TV

Local inhabitants, youth, local business men

Web-site at www.tata.hu location

National and international visitors, conservation groups, local business men

C. Printed media

Materials

Targeted audiences

Brochure: Lake Tata: meeting point of Nature & Culture

Hungarian version – secondary schools of Tata (5), primary schools (6), nurseries (6), Office of the Mayor, offices of tourinform, campings, penzions, hotels, cultural center, library, NGOs.

English & German versions – offices of tourinform, tourist agencies campings, penzions, hotels, Office of the Mayor, twin towns of Tata

Booklet: Reconstruction of Tata and the Ramsar Convention

Ministries, offices and departments, MPs of Parliament, members of local government, members of Által-ér Association (local governments of 23 settlements, 31 companies from business sector) interested in restoration of the lake, offices of tourinform, twin towns of Tata, Dutch Embassy

Card calendar on lake Tata

Schools, visitors at festivals, tourist agencies, accommodations, NGO’s

Indicators

How can we measure success of our communication strategy? What are the indicators we will use to measure success or failure?

Monitoring & Evaluation

Impact of the communication intervention is to be determined through monitoring and evaluation activities. The proposed sociological survey will provide inputs to the programme. The repetition of the survey can be seen as a monitoring instrument. Positive feedback is expected in the results of November survey and visible differences between the surveys. The May survey can reveal the specific areas where such communication activities should be focused.

Detailed description of planned communication activities and media

INTERPERSONAL MEDIA
Events (Target groups: visitors, local inhabitants, business sector)

Water-Music-Flowers Festival
Date: June 28 - July 1.
Expected number of visitors: 80.000 people
Organiser: Society for Water-Music-Flowers Festival (Chair: Kálovics Imre)
Main organiser: Magyary Zoltán Cultural Center (Director: Szentessy Lászlóné)
Tel: (34) 380-811, 587-055
Description: This traditional festival is one of the most significant events in this period of the year in West Hungary. Year by year the festival is recognised more, and many tourist groups visit the town at that time.

Tata Fishermen's Day Festival
Date: 28, October, 2001.
Expected number of visitors: 3.000 people
Organisers: Tata Agricultural Ltd. Municipal of Tata, BirdLife Hungary Komárom-Esztergom County Branch
Description: A new initiative of fishermen at Tata who would like to create a tradition by celebrating fishery and fishing activities at the lake.

Wild Geese Festival
Date: 2001. December 6-9.
Expected number of visitors: 2.000 people
Organiser: BirdLife Hungary Komárom-Esztergom County Branch
Tel: Csonka Péter - (34) 313-310; Musicz László - (34) 383-393; (30) 247-0613
Description: The festival is aimed at to celebrate the arrival of winter visitor birds at lake Tata involving presentations, lectures, slide-shows, 'public events' and other activities that attract many people. Locations: Conference: Tatai Olimpiai Edzotábor, or Castle of Tata, Birding Santa Claus: Bird tower at Lake Tata, Open-air fish-soup cooking: A park around the Lake (Építok parkja)

Activities for the festivals:
Display posters and information materials, dissemination brochures, organising „attractions" (drawing and nature conservation 'competitions' for kids, presentations for youngsters, etc.)

MASS MEDIA
Newspapers (Target groups: local inhabitants, leaders of different user groups of Tata)

1. Komárom-Esztergom megyei 24 ÓRA (County daily news) Copies published:
Editor-in Chief: dr. Sztrapák Ferenc
Director of the publisher: E. Nagy Lajos
Address of the office and the publisher: 2800 Tatabánya, Fo tér 4.
Tel.: (34) 514-010
Fax: (34) 514-011
E-mail: szerk.kom@axels.hu Contact perosn: Bohunka Mónika

2. Komárom-Esztergom Megyei Hírlap (County daily news) Copies published:
Editor-in -Chief: Vámosi László
Marketing manager: Józsáné S. Zsuzsa
Address of the office and the publisher: 2901 Komárom, Igmándi út 1.
Tel.: (34) 540-521
Fax: (34) 342-361
E-mail: knyomda@mail.matav.hu
Contact person: Crisan Marius (photo+text)

Activities:
By involving C. Marius, to inform the public on the significant steps of the communication campaign, e.g. evaluation of questionnaires (July, November). Shorter-longer articles on actions, initiatives related to the campaign on a regular basis (monthly from July till December). A series of articles will be published in which representatives of different stakeholder groups not directly associated with nature conservation (the Mayor of Tata, well known leaders of local agencies, business sector etc) will demonstrate their personal view on the beauty of the wetland.

Television
Tatai TV, regional TV
(Sopron)
A 7 minutes film showing the wetland values. It is to be on the local TV several time, especially to raise awareness

PRINTED MEDIA
Brochure
(All stakeholder groups are targeted)

Lake Tata - Meeting point of Nature & Culture
Description: 3 language colour brochure with photos, the logo of Ramsar Convention, showing the mots important natural and cultural values of the wetland underlining the important role of the site in migration of wild geese.
Proposed copies: Hungarian - 10.000; English - 2.000; German - 2.000 .
Proposed dissemination:
Hungarian version - secondary schools of Tata (5), primary schools (6), nurseries (6), Office of the Mayor, offices of tourinform, campings, pensions, hotels, cultural center, library, NGOs.
English & German versions - offices of tourinform, tourist agencies campings, penzions, hotels, Office of the Mayor, twin towns of Tata

Booklet (All stakeholder groups are targeted)
Reconstruction of Lake Tata and the Ramsar Convention
Description: The colour, ten-pages publication would show the most important steps needed to restore Lake Tata (reconstruction at the end of the lake, biological filtration fields, balancing land uses, etc.) with short explanation. It is also planned to be published in English in order to look for possible international assistance, sponsors, etc.
Proposed number of copies: Hungarian: 1.000 ; English: 200
Proposed dissemination:
Ministries, offices and departments, MPs of Parliament, members of local government, members of Által-ér Association (local governments of 23 settlements, 31 companies from business sector) interested in restoration of the lake, offices of tourinform, twin towns of Tata, Dutch Embassy

Card calendar on lakeTata (All stakeholder groups are targeted)
Description: A colour card showing an example from the most outstanding values of the wetland, underlining the co-existing town and the wetland.
Proposed copies: 5.000
Proposed dissemination: schools, visitors at festivals, tourist agencies, places of accomodation, NGO-s, etc.


Return to the CEPA Programme index page

Back to top
Suivez-nous sur :      
Prix Ramsar

La Convention aujourd'hui

Nombre de » Parties contractantes : 168 Sites sur la » Liste des zones humides d'importance internationale : 2186 Surface totale des sites désignés (hectares) : 208.674.247

Secrétariat de Ramsar

Rue Mauverney 28
CH-1196 Gland, Suisse
Tel.: +41 22 999 0170
Fax: +41 22 999 0169
E-Mail : ramsar@ramsar.org
Carte : cliquez ici

Devenez membre du Forum Ramsar