The 9th Meeting of the Conference of the Contracting Parties

03/10/2005


"Wetlands and water: supporting life, sustaining livelihoods"
9th Meeting of the Conference of the Contracting Parties
to the Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971)
Kampala, Uganda, 8-15 November 2005
 

Ramsar COP9 DOC. 10
English only

Regional overview of the implementation of the Convention and its Strategic Plan 2003 - 2008 in Asia

National Reports upon which this overview is based can be consulted on the Ramsar Web site, http://ramsar.org/cop9/cop9_natlrpts_index.htm.

Contracting Parties in Asia as of September 2005 (26): Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, India, Indonesia, Islamic Republic of Iran, Israel, Japan, Jordan, Kyrgyz Republic, Lebanon, Malaysia, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Philippines, Republic of Korea, Sri Lanka, Syrian Arab Republic, Tajikistan, Thailand, Uzbekistan, Viet Nam

Contracting Parties whose full National Reports are included in this analysis (12): Bahrain, Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, India, Indonesia, Israel, Japan, Jordan, Lebanon, Nepal, and Thailand

Contracting Parties whose short version of the National Report are included in this analysis (9): Azerbaijan, Islamic Republic of Iran, Kyrgyz Republic, Malaysia, Pakistan, Philippines, Republic of Korea, Sri Lanka, and Viet Nam

Contracting Parties that have not yet submitted their National Reports (4): Mongolia, Syrian Arab Republic, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan

Myanmar is a recent accession to the Convention and is therefore not expected to present a COP9 National Report.

1. Main achievements since COP8 and priorities for 2006-2008

1.1 Main achievements since COP8.

A1 Among 43 Asian countries, 26 are already Contracting Parties, including Myanmar which acceded to the Convention in 2004. Other countries, such as Kazakhstan, Lao PDR and Yemen, have been making progress towards their accession. The parliament of Kazakhstan has approved its government proposal for their accession recently; and in Yemen similar progress has also been made.

A2 Since COP8, 45 new Ramsar sites have been designated, including 10 high altitude mountain wetlands (China 8, Kyrgyz 1, India 1), 13 coastal wetlands (China 1, Indonesia 1, Japan 5, Malaysia 3, Pakistan 1, Sri Lanka 1, Vietnam 1), 1 peatland (Korea 1), 21 other wetlands (India 4, Japan 4, Myanmar 1, Mongolia 5, Nepal 3, Pakistan 4). With these new designations, the total number of Ramsar sites in Asia reaches 175, which accounts for 12% of the global number of sites.

A3 95% of the Parties report that they have completed or in the process of conducting their comprehensive national wetland inventory, which is significantly higher than the global level (81%), and a significantly improvement from the Asian level reported to COP8 (57%).

A4 Two-thirds of the Parties have fully, and more than 85% of the Parties have at least partially integrated wetland issues (conservation, wise use, restoration/rehabilitation) into other sectoral strategic or planning processes at varies administrative levels, which again demonstrates the effectiveness of the implementation in this area and reconfirms the progress made before COP8.

A5 All full-version 12 National Reports reported that they have, or partly have legislation on EIA applicable to wetlands in their country, compared to only 47% that Asia reported to COP8 and 71% globally reported to COP9.

A6 80% of the Parties with coastlines have integrated, or in the process of integrating wetland issue into coastal zone management. Compared to less than 50% before COP8, this is substantial progress.

A7 Among 21 Contracting Parties that submitted their national reports, 76% have developed a wetland restoration programme, and more than 90% of the Parties are at various stages of restoring their wetlands, compared to 52% and 74% at global level and 19% and 76% that the Asia region reported to COP8.

A8 During the past three years, 70% of the Parties have been involved in the development of a regional initiative in the framework of the Convention. The Himalayan Initiative has seen participation from seven Parties (Bangladesh, China, India, Kyrgyz Republic, Nepal, Pakistan and Tajikistan) and one non-Contracting Party (Bhutan); the Asia Pacific Migratory Water Bird Conservation Partnership has involved more than 13 countries along the East Asia-Australasia Flyway; other regional initiatives are emerging too, such as the Research and Training Center for Central and Western Asia, which was launched in Iran in 2005 and the Mekong river wetland conservation initiative, which is under constructive discussion.

A9 The 2005 Asian Wetland Symposium (AWS) has extensively contributed to enhancing effective regional cooperation and networking of people in Asia by providing a single platform among various sectors including national / local governments, NGOs, scientific experts, the private sector, local and indigenous peoples and other stakeholders engaged in wetland management. In 2005, 400 participants from 32 countries participated in the Asian Wetland Symposium held in Bhubaneswar and Chilika, Orissa, India.

A10 Parties have taken very proactive ways in developing wetland conservation programmes and the fundraising to implement them. Indicator 15.1.8-1 & 15.1.9-1 (Annex IV) shows that majority of the developing countries have submitted their proposals to the development agencies, as well as to GEF in the past 3 years.

1.2 Priorities analysis and suggestions for 2006-2008

Priority analysis

1. The following Parties have included in the National Report the section of National Planning Tools: Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, India, Indonesia, Israel, Japan, Jordan, Lebanon, Nepal and Thailand

2. This information allows the Secretariat to have a regional view of the priorities that have been set by the Parties for implementation. Below is a list of all 13 operational objectives that have been set by the majorities of the Contracting Parties as "A" priority (shown as percentage of Parties) - the objectives themselves are listed in Annex IV.

3. Obj. 2.1, 92% of the Parties set this objective as top priority and it has been well implemented (see paragraph 4 in main achievement section)

4. Obj. 1.1, 82% of the Parties set this as "A" priority and it has been well implemented (see paragraph 3 in main achievement section).

5. Obj. 9.1 82% of the Parties set this as "A" priority, but little progress been made in the past three years. Apart from the World Wetlands Day celebrations, Asia is not doing well in many of the strategic actions, such as less than 10% of the Parties established National Wetlands CEPA Task Force, less than 15% of the Parties have developed their National CEPA Action Plans although around 80% of Parties have appointed national and NGO CEPA focal points. Similarly, performance in the pilot project in CEPA to promote wise use of wetlands and the CEPA expertise for atchment/river basin planning are not very encouraging.

6. Obj.11.1, 82% of the Parties set this as "A" priority, but this becomes the major challenge for Asia countries. During the past triennium, none of the 12 sites listed on the Montreux Record has applied to be removed. In addition to that, 22 sites have reported changes or likely changes in ecological character. Such a trend is likely to continue given the great human development pressure on the limited wetland resources in Asia.

7. Obj. 3.1 -3.3, 73% of the Parties set this as "A" priority, but the implementation of this objective is a mixture. About 50% of the Parties have, and additional 25% have partly, reviewed the Ramsar wise use concept, its applicability and its consistency with the objectives of sustainable development.

8. Obj. 4.1, 73% of the Parties set this as "A" priority, and it has been well implemented in the past triennium (see paragraph 7 in main achievement section).

9. Obj. 6.1, 73% of the Parties set this as "A" priority, but Asia is not performing well in all indicators, except for the indicator on public participation in decision-making, which 7 out of 12 Parties reported to have implemented, and additional 3 Parties achieved partially.

10. Obj. 15.1, 73% of the Parties set this as "A" priority, and it has been well implemented during the past triennium (see paragraph 10 in main achievement section).

11. Obj. 20.1, 64% of the Parties set this as "A" priority, but little progress has been made in the past triennium. There was not a single Party that has completed its training needs for the implementation of the Convention during the past triennium, and this should be improved as a top priority in coming years.

12. Obj. 10.1, 55% of the Parties set this as "A" priority, and some progress been made, but Asia should contribute more substantially in this objective to the global targets, since this region owns the most diverse and extensive mangroves, coral reefs, peatland and wet grasses in the world.

13. Obj. 18.1, 55% of the Parties set this as "A" priority, and progress been made in some aspects, such as the mechanism for cooperation between Ramsar AAs and other institutions, but less than 30% of the Parties have set up a coordination committee with other MEA focal points.

14. Obj. 3.4, 55% of the Parties set this as "A" priority, but the implementation rate on all tasks has been rather low since COP8, with less then 30% of the Parties integrating policies on the conservation and wise use of wetlands in the planning activities, and in decision-making processes at national, regional, provincial and local levels, particularly concerning territorial management, groundwater management, catchment/river basin management, coastal and marine zone planning, and responses to climate change.

15. Obj. 5.1, 55% of the Parties set this as "A" priority, but little progress has been made since COP8 on development of practical guidance for prevention, control and eradication of invasive species. Figure for indicator 5.1.2-1 reported to COP8 were 29% and 33% respectively, compared to 25% and 50% that reported to COP9.

Priority recommendation for 2006-2008

16. From above analysis, only objective 2.1, 1.1, 4.1 and 15.1 have been well implemented, whereas objective 10.1 and 18.1 have been progressed during the past triennium, but the rest of the objectives that have been set as priorities have not been fully implemented or need major improvement in the coming triennium. Combining these areas that need major improvement, with the global strategies (draft Resolution DR9) and Asian region context, the following priorities for 2006-2008 have been identified and recommended:

P1 Obj. 3.1 -3.3, Increase recognition of the significance of wetlands for reasons of water supply, coastal protection, flood defence, food security, poverty alleviation, cultural heritage, and scientific research.

P2 Obj. 3.4, Integrate policies on the conservation and wise use of wetlands in the planning activities, and in decision-making processes at all levels, with special attention to the mitigation of global climate change.

P3 Obj. 5.1, Develop guidance and promote protocols and actions to prevent, control or eradicate invasive alien species in wetland systems.

P4 Obj. 6.1, Encourage active and informed participation of local communities and indigenous people, including women and youth, in the conservation and wise use of wetlands, including in relation to understanding the dynamics of cultural values.

P5 Obj. 9.1, Implement at all levels the Convention's Communication, Education, and Public Awareness Programme.

P6 Obj. 10.1, Apply the Strategic Framework and guidelines for the future development of the List of Wetlands of International Importance (Ramsar Handbook 7).

P7 Obj.11.1, Maintain the ecological character of all Ramsar sites.

P8 Obj. 12.3 Encourage development of regional initiatives under the Convention, especially the Himalayan Initiative, Asia Pacific Migratory Water Birds Conservation Partnership, Ramsar Training and Research Center for Central and Western Asia.

P9 Obj. 18.1, Develop the capacity within, and promote cooperation among, institutions in Contracting Parties to achieve conservation and wise use of wetlands;

P10 Obj. 20.1, Identify the training needs of institutions and individuals concerned with the conservation and wise use of wetlands.

P11 Obj. 21.1, Progress towards universal membership of the Convention. Although this objective had been set as "A" priority by only 25% of the Parties, from regional and global perspectives this should be one of the high priorities for next triennium. Asia still has 17 countries that have not yet ratified the Convention, which remains the largest gap for the Convention to become universal. The Secretariat would like to invite all Parties to work together to involve the non-Contracting Parties in the region for their accession.

17. Asia, with its majority of developing countries, accounts for up to 60% of the world population, but with limited resources, and the pressure of development on the wetland ecosystem is the greatest in the world. Yet compared to other regions, Asia does not have a regional mechanism, as Europe and Africa do, that can work together under the single political framework, and this leave a particular niche for the Ramsar Convention to fill in. How to implement the Convention more effectively, especially how to integrate wetland conservation and wise use with sustainable development, should remain at the top of the agenda in all Asian countries.

Conclusions of the Asia Regional COP9 preparatory meeting (Beijing, China, 13-16 May 2005)

Issues and priorities identified by the meeting, in particularly relating to issues which will be considered at COP9, included:

1. In relation to the periodic series of Asian Wetland Symposia (AWS), that the "Chilika Statement" agreed by the 3rd Asian Wetland Symposium (Chilika, India, 6-9 February 2005, should be widely disseminated (a copy is attached to this report in Annex III); that the periodic holding of an Asian Wetland Symposium should continue and should be linked with Ramsar regional implementation activities; and that the value of a regional scientific and technical wetlands forum such as the AWS in other regions should be recognized. This last priority is addressed in COP9 DR20, submitted by the government of Japan.

2. The invitation by the Republic of Korea to host COP10 in 2008, presented to the meeting, was supported.

3. The development of subregional initiatives in Asia, including the Himalayan Initiative; the Ramsar Center Iran for Central and West Asia; and the WSSD Type II Partnership for East Asia - Australasia Flyway Partnership we welcomed, as was the future development of a regional initiative for the wise use of peatlands in Northeast Asia (Amur river) and Central Asia.

4. The Ramsar Small Grants Fund mechanism should be strengthened; and an additional grants mechanism specifically for the Asia region (similar to the Wetlands for the Future (Americas) and the Swiss Grant for Africa) should be established.

5. Regional Ramsar meetings create an effective platform for communication and the development of the implementation of the Ramsar Convention in Asia, and these should be continued in future triennia.

6. COP9 DR15 on wetlands and poverty reduction is important for the Asia region, and should clearly recognise that many of the world's poor live in or near wetlands and are dependent on them, and there are risks not only to the existing poor but also of others falling into poverty, and that the role PRSPs should be recognized.

7. COP9 DR10 on natural disasters is also important for the Asia region, and specific reference should be made in it to the promotion of recovery from the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami and measures for future mitigation and attention to vulnerability to such events.

2. Activities undertaken since COP8 to implement the Convention

18. Among 323 indicators that are included in the National Report Format, only 80 or so indicators that have high relevance to Asia have been chosen for this analysis - these include 40 indicators reported in the short version National Report and an additional 40 indicators found only in the full version. In the following analysis, we have clustered answers to the questions in three levels, e.g, "Yes", "Other Positive Answers (Partially/partly, In Progress, Updated)", and "No". Tabular data of NR responses can be found in Annex IV.

2.1 Inventory and assessment (Operational objectives 1.1-1.2)

19. On average, objectives on wetland inventory and assessment have been well implemented in Asia - only one Party has not yet conducted a comprehensive national wetland inventory so far. About 95% of the Parties have completed or are in the process of conducting their comprehensive national wetland inventory, which is significantly higher than the global level (81%) and a significant improvement from the Asian level reported to COP8 (57%).

20. Data from 12 full-version NRs indicates that five Parties have used the methodologies recommended in the Ramsar Framework for Wetland Inventory, another four Parties applied this partly, and only two Parties failed to do so. However, further information shows that, on average, the incidence of a full inventory that looked at specific aspects of wetland functions and services, such as water supply, flood control, poverty alleviation, coastal protection, and its scientific importance, etc., has been rather low, in the range of only 10 to 25%. A similar picture can also be drawn from the data on the activities that assess the vulnerability of wetlands to changes in ecological character, and the assessment of water quantity and quality (which responses indicated have been fully implemented by 25% and 19% of Parties, respectively). It is encouraging, however, that more Parties are on their way to carrying out such activities.

21. Inventory data has been disseminated to managers, wetland users and decision-makers by 70% of the Contracting Parties, which is similar to global progress.

2.2 Policies and legislation, including impact assessment and valuation (Operational objectives 2.1-2.2)

22. Progress has been made in developing national wetland policies since COP8, for the percentage of Parties having implemented this strategy has increased from 38% to 50% - a similar pattern can also be seen from the "All Positive" answers, which increased from 57% to 67%. Similarly, 57% of the Parties have fully, and 71% of the Parties have to some extent, incorporated wetland issues into national strategies for sustainable development, which is in line with the global picture (70%).

23. Two thirds of the Parties have fully, and more than 85% of the Parties have partially integrated wetland issues (conservation, wise use, restoration/rehabilitation) into other sectoral strategic or planning processes at various administrative levels, which again demonstrates the effectiveness of the implementation of Objective 2.1.2 and reconfirms the progress made before COP8.

24. In this respect, two areas need major improvement. More than half of the Parties that are in the developing stage and have committed to alleviating poverty do not recognize the importance of wetlands. Another aspect is the linkage between wetlands and water resource management and water efficiency plans, where only 42% of the Parties implemented this objective, although an additional 30% of the Parties reported that they are making progress.

25. A significant improvement can be inferred from the fact that all Parties with full-version NRs reported that they have, or partly have, incorporated legislation on Environmental Impact Assessment applicable to wetlands in their country, compared to only 47% that Asia reported to COP8 and 71% globally reported to COP9. However, we have to be aware that these 12 reports may not represent the whole situation in Asia, for with the inclusion of more reports, the percentage may drop to a lower level. There is also the question of enforcement of the legislation, reinfored by the fact that the Ramsar Secretariat frequently receives reports or complaints about development projects that have significant negative impacts on the wetlands in the region.

2.3 Integration of wetland wise use into sustainable development (Operational objectives 3.1-3.3)

26. About 50% of the Parties have reviewed the Ramsar wise use concept, its applicability and its consistency with the objectives of sustainable development, and an additional 25% of the Parties have partly done so.

27. 42% of Parties have, and additional 33% of the Parties have partly, taken measures to promote the wise use of wetlands for water supply, coastal protection, flood mitigation, food security, poverty alleviation, culture heritage, and scientific research. This has been particularly reinforced after the recent tsunami in the Indian Ocean and the flooding in Asia countries. Similarly, wise use wetland programmes and/or projects that contribute to poverty alleviation objectives and food and water security plans have been developed. Along this line, two thirds of the Parties are promoting conservation and wise use of peatlands as an example of the ecosystem approach.

28. Asia has long history of human intervention with wetland resources, which helped to form a particular culture in which people care for wetland resources for their survival. It is encouraging to see that more than 80% of the Parties have incorporated social and culture heritage aspects of the wetlands into their wise use and management. However, in terms of involving local communities in wetland management, this has only reached a starting point (only 25% done, and an additional 50% applied partially).

29. A research focus on the ecological services and functions, social, economic and culture aspects of wetlands has not yet become a popular subject in Asia, with only 25% of the Parties having promoted this work, with an additional 33% of the Parties in the process of doing so.

2.3.A Integration of wetland policies into broader planning and management from local to national scales (Operational objective 3.4)

30. Performance in both indicators 3.4.2 on river basin management and 3.4.5 on integrated coastal zone management has improved since COP8. At that time, only four Parties had integrated wetland conservation and wise use into river basin management, and now four more Parties report having done so, with an additional nine Parties in the process. We have to notice, though, that four Parties that did not apply this guideline before COP8 have made no progress at all since then.

31. In terms of integrating wetlands into coastal zone management, substantial progress has been made since COP8. Fully 80% of the Parties with coastlines report having done so or being in the process of doing so, compared to less than 50% before COP8. The level of implementation in Asia is also significantly higher than the global level (<50%). Such a trend had also been reflected in the Asian Wetland Symposium and in the Asia Regional COP9 Preparatory Meeting. The Indian Ocean tsunami has also drawn the attention of whole societies to looking at the way they have managed their wetlands and coastal zones, conveying a strong message of the importance of integrating wetlands into coastal zone management.

32. It is especially important for Parties in Asia to implement the Guidelines on allocation and management of water for maintaining ecological functions of wetlands, as a majority of the Parties in Asia have faced water scarcities for decades, and intensive water use practice with comprehensive water diversion schemes have been developed in the region which have caused degradation of the ecological functions of many wetlands (see site management section). Two-thirds of the Parties have applied this guideline to various degrees, with 20% fully applied, compared with the global level of 49% and 13%, respectively.

2.4 Wetland restoration and rehabilitation (Operational Objective 4)

33. The Asia region has been doing very well in wetland restoration and rehabilitation, with 76% of the Parties having developed such a programme and more than 90% of the Parties at various stages in implementing this objective, compared to 52% and 74% at global level, and 19% and 76% that the Asia region reported to COP8. This reflects progress and a much greater awareness of wetlands' importance in the region. Mostly important is the fact that the Parties have integrated the principle and guidelines of wetland restoration into their national wetland policy - 9 out of 12 Parties that submitted full-version NRs reported positively on this indicator.

34. The restoration programmes have mostly (70%) been focused on priority areas and have applied the Ramsar Principles and Guidelines for wetland restoration. All Parties conducting restoration and rehabilitation programmes have made available the information, or case studies, including research and methodology of wetland restoration and rehabilitation, for the public. 70% of the Parties have taken river basin management into consideration while planning restoration programmes. There is a very positive trend to involve local indigenous people in the restoration projects, with 84% of the Parties having done so in one way or another.

35. However, only one Party has partly used the guidelines on wetland restoration in consideration of the implications of the Kyoto Protocol. Such a low rate may reflect the confusion of the Parties about this indicator, as well as the fact that many Parties in the region have not yet signed that agreement.

36. On training needs for the restoration of wetland ecosystem systems, more than 60% of Parties have identified opportunities for this.

2.5 Invasive alien species (Operational Objective 5.1)

37. Ten out of 12 Parties that submitted the full-version NR reported having either developed or being in the process of developing and implementing responses to the threats from invasive species in their national planning. However, little progress has been made since COP8 on development of practical guidance for prevention, control and eradication of invasive species - the figures for this indicator reported to COP8 were 29% and 33% respectively, compared to 25% and 50% reported to COP9.

38. About 50% of the Parties that submitted the full-version NR reported having made efforts to assess the risks of invasive species. However, we have received rather limited information on risks of invasive species to Ramsar sites in Asia.

2.6 Local communities, indigenous people, and cultural values (Operational Objective 6.1)

39. In general, Asia is not performing well in the indicators under this objective, except for the indicator on public participation in decision-making, for which it was reported by 7 out of 12 Parties that they have implemented it, with an additional three Parties having achieved it partially.

40. Fewer than 50% of the Parties have applied the guidance for the participation of local communities and indigenous people in wetland management, and similarly fewer than 50% of the Parties have documented traditional knowledge and practices in relation to wetlands. There has been an even less encouraging performance in the documentation of cultural values of wetlands and the application of the Convention's guiding principles on cultural values of wetlands. Only two Parties have compiled resource information and case studies on cultural aspects of wetlands, and four Parties have applied the guiding principles. It is a positive sign, however, that many Parties are on their way toward working on this, with 50-80% of the Parties making some progress on these indicators.

2.7 Private sector involvement (Operational Objective 7.1)

41. The level of implementation reported for Asia in promoting the involvement of the private sector in the wise use of wetlands is very similar to the global implementation picture; however, it is poorer than it was in Asia's report to COP8. Whereas 76% and 81% for "Yes" and "All positive" were reported to COP8, respectively, in this triennium the figures were 25% and 75%.

2.8 Incentives (Operational Objective 8.1)

42. Similar to the report to COP8, in this triennium Asia has again made very little progress in reviewing positive and perverse incentives to the wise use of wetlands. Obviously, this is a field that needs urgent and innovative approaches in the coming triennium. Since the global level of implementation is also similar to the regional, a COP Resolution, or guidelines, may be worth considering in the next triennium.

2.9 Communication, education, and public awareness (CEPA) (Operational Objective 9.1)

43. One third of the responding Parties report actively integrating CEPA activities into the implementation of the Convention, and a further 50% are making progress toward that.

44. All these indicators seem to indicate a better performance in Asia than the global average. However, apart from the World Wetlands Day celebrations, Asia is not doing well in many of the strategic actions - for example, fewer than 10% of the Parties established their National Wetlands CEPA Task Force and fewer than 15% have developed their National CEPA Action Plan, although around 80% of Parties have appointed national and NGO CEPA focal points. Similarly, performance in the pilot project in CEPA to promote the wise use of wetlands, and the CEPA expertise for catchment/river basin planning, is not very well reported. A majority of the Parties have not done anything in these fields.

45. On the other hand, it is very pleasing to see that almost all Parties have organized World Wetlands Day (WWD) activities each year, and the WWD posters designed by the Ramsar Secretariat have been translated into several Asian languages, such as Chinese, Thai, Vietnamese, and Arabic, for wider dissemination.

2.10 Designation of Ramsar sites

2.10.A Application of the Strategic Framework (Operational Objective 10.1)

46. 57% of Parties have applied the Strategic Framework to help develop the Ramsar List, and an additional 30% have done this partly, which is at the same level that was reported to COP8, but higher than the global level reported to COP9.

47. Since COP8, 45 new Ramsar sites have been designated, which include 10 high altitude mountain wetlands (China 8, Kyrgyz 1, India 1), 13 coastal wetlands (China 1, Indonesia 1, Japan 5, Malaysia 3, Pakistan 1, Sri Lanka 1, Vietnam 1), 1 peatland (Korea), and 21 other wetlands (India 4, Japan 4, Myanmar 1, Mongolia 5, Nepal 3, Pakistan 4). With these new designations, the total number of Ramsar sites in Asia reaches 175, which accounts for 12% of the global number of sites.

48. Since COP8, designations of under-represented Ramsar sites have been made by Indonesia (mangroves), Japan (coral reef, mangroves, and peatland), Korea (peatland), Malaysia (mangroves), and Sri Lanka (mangroves). However, Asia should contribute more substantially in this objective to the global targets, since this region owns the most diverse and extensive mangroves, coral reefs, peatland and wet grasses in the world.

2.10.B Maintenance and use of the Ramsar Sites Database [10.2]

49. Only 44% of the Parties updated the Ramsar Information Sheet in a timely manner, every six years as requested by the COP, but an additional 26% are in the process of doing so. In 2004, the Secretariat sent letters to 20 concerned Parties on this issue, in order to remind them of the need for updating their RISs for 80 Ramsar sites. So far, we have received 28 updated RISs, and the rest are still in progress.

2.11 Management planning and monitoring of Ramsar sites

2.11.A Maintenance of the ecological character of all Ramsar sites (Operational Objective 11.1)

50. Among the 12 Parties that submitted full-version NRs, only 25% of Parties have defined and applied measures that require maintaining the ecological characters of Ramsar sites. However, a majority of the Parties are on their way to developing these (92% have taken positive actions of some kind). It is good to see that 10 out of 12 Parties have established, or are on the way to establishing, cross-sectoral site management committees at the Ramsar sites. A similar number report that they are taking into account the wider management implications of agriculture practices, river basin management, and coastal zone management into Ramsar site management planning.

51. There is also a trend toward applying the New Guidelines for management planning, though currently only 28% of the Parties have fully done so, with a majority (80% in total) on their way to applying them. About 50% of the 175 Ramsar sites have developed their management plans and strategy, of which number some 60% of the management plans and strategies have been fully applied at the sites, with the remaining 40% still in the consultation process.

52. No Party has reported that Article 2.5 has been invoked in delisting or restricting the boundaries of Ramsar sites. However, the Ramsar Secretariat has been in discussion with one Party about its intention to reduce the size of the Ramsar site.

2.11.B Monitoring the condition of Ramsar sites (including application of Article 3.2 and the Montreux Record) (Operational Objective 11.2)

53. Ten out of 12 Parties that submitted full-version NRs indicated that they have monitoring programmes for all of or at least some of their Ramsar sites. In total, at least 33 sites have established monitoring programmes.

54. Eight Parties have included at least 12 Ramsar sites for the baseline and reference area for national environmental monitoring. However, not a single Party provided any information on the status and trends of the loss of biodiversity, climate change and the processes of desertification of the Ramsar sites.

55. Some 31 sites from five Parties have reported changes or likely changes (both positive and negative, with 50/50 of the cases) in ecological character of the Ramsar sites. Additional sites (no number indicated in the National Reports) from five Parties are in the process of undergoing such changes. We have also received third party complaints that at least six Ramsar sites are changing or are going to change their ecological characters due to development, and the Ramsar Secretariat has sent letters to the concerned Ramsar AAs seeking further information. However, only one Party has reported to the Secretariat according to Article 3.2 of the Convention, and this causes significant problems to other Contracting Parties for their wetland management planning since they are simply not informed of the ecological character changes taking place in their neighbouring countries. Moreover, if the concerned Party does not report such negative changes, it is impossible for international society to offer collective action to help to stop or reverse such changes.

56. Since the only reported Article 3.2 case is already on the Montreux Record, no site has been included in the Montreux Record since COP8.

57. Currently, there are 12 sites from five Contracting Parties (India 2, Iran 7, Jordan 1, Kyrgyz Republic 1 and Azerbaijan 1) included in the Montreux Record. Four out of the five Parties report that they have been taking action to address the issues of the sites. However, none of them have officially reported to the Ramsar Secretariat on what actions they have taken, and only one Party seems to be intending to do so. It seems that the Parties do not wish to communicate their experience and lessons that they have learnt in tackling the issue. One possible explanation might be that the concerned Parties consider having their site included in the Montreux Record to be the equivalent of being included in "black list". This is not true, and that perception should be changed in the future, so that lessons and experiences can be shared by other Parties.

58. It is good news that, among seven Iranian sites on the Montreux Record, four of them have been recovering very well during the past three years, and we are looking forward to seeing these sites being considered for removal from the Montreux Record in coming years.

2.12 Management of shared water resources, wetlands and wetland species (Operational Objective 12.1)

59. At least 40 transboundary wetlands have been identified by nine Parties (Azerbaijan, Cambodia, China, India, Iran, Israel, Nepal, Pakistan and Vietnam) since COP8, but none of those Parties has reported having taken action towards working together to develop joint management plans. However, efforts have been made by the Parties to develop or become involved in developing regional initiatives in the framework of the Convention. So far, 70% of the Parties have participated in various regional initiatives described below:

A. Himalayan Initiative

60. Since the 2002 Urumqi Workshop, which adopted an "Urumqi Call" for the Conservation of High Altitude Wetlands, Lakes and Catchments in the Himalayan region, the Governments of Bangladesh, Bhutan, China, India, Kyrgyzstan, Nepal, Pakistan, and Tajikistan have been effectively participating in a series of workshops to share information and experience, develop a common strategy, and adopt a framework agreement for this initiative, through the Kathmandu workshop in 2003, the Sanya Workshop in 2004, and an Evian Encounter in 2004.

B. Asia Pacific Migratory Water Bird Conservation Strategy

61. Up to now, the total number of sites in the three flyway networks is 85 across 13 participating countries, with over 56 percent of these also designated under the Ramsar List of internationally important wetlands. These sites cover an area of nearly 12,400,000 hectares. Since COP8, three meetings have taken place, including the 8th and 9th meetings of the Asia-Pacific Migratory Waterbird Conservation Committee and the first partnership meeting of the WSSD initiative to conserve migratory waterbirds and wetlands in the East Asian-Australasian Flyway.

C. Ramsar Regional Center in Iran

62. The Ramsar Regional Center for Training and Research on Wetlands in Western and Central Asia was launched in Ramsar, Islamic Republic of Iran, in February 2005, and recently an interim Secretary has been appointed.

D. Mekong Region Ramsar Initiative

63. The Asian Ramsar Meeting in Beijing (May 2005) served as a starting point with regard to discussions on the development of a Mekong Region Ramsar Initiative. A Round Table Meeting is being organized for Ramsar COP9 to discuss this proposed initiative, and it is expected to provide the opportunity for heads of delegations of the participating States and others to further discuss the need for such an initiative, its niche and what it might entail. The Kampala Mekong Round Table also aims to identify the way forward for further development of this proposed initiative.

E. Participation in the MedWet Initiative

64. Four Parties (Israel, Lebanon, Jordan and Syria) have been participating in the MedWet Initiative.

2.13 Collaboration with other Multilateral Environmental Agreements and institutions (Operational Objective 13.1)

65. 71% of the Parties report that they have the mechanism in place, or are in the process of developing the mechanism, for national level collaboration between the Ramsar Administrative Authority and the National Focal Points of other Multilateral Environmental Agreements.

2.14 Sharing of expertise and information (Operational Objective 14.1)

66. The Asian Wetland Symposia (AWS) in 1992 (Japan), 2001 (Malaysia), and 2005 (India), organized through the leadership of the Ramsar Center Japan (RCJ), an NGO based in Japan, strongly contributed to enhancing effective regional cooperation and networking of people in Asia by providing a single platform among various sectors including national / local governments, NGOs, scientific experts, the private sector, local and indigenous peoples and other stakeholders engaged in wetland management. In 2005, 400 participants from 32 countries participated in the Asian Wetland Symposium in Bhubaneswar and Chilika, Orissa, India, and the agreed statement that resulted from the meeting is included here as an annex.

67. Several thematic conferences/workshops, such as the "Dushanbe Water Forum", "Workshop on Lagoon Wetlands", "Workshop on Mangrove Forest management", "Workshops on Mountain Wetlands Conservation", etc., have been organized in Asia, and many Parties have organized wetland conferences/workshops at national level in the past three years. All of these indicate that Asia has been progressing very well in terms of sharing knowledge and expertise at the regional level.

68. Concerning knowledge-sharing and training networks among wetlands sharing common features, fewer than 20% of the Parties have made progress in this area, with an additional 22% in the process or partly implementing this. This might be an underestimation at the regional level, since the Asia Pacific Migratory Water Bird Conservation Strategy promotes three groups of water bird site networks, as mentioned above, and there are currently more than 85 wetlands that have been included in those networks, from 13 Contracting Parties in the region. Other site networks are also making progress, such as the Mangrove Site Network, Himalayan Mountain Wetlands Site Network, etc.

69. However, only two Parties have set up twinning arrangements for wetlands sites (two pairs in Japan and one pair in India) for knowledge-sharing and training. Although seven more Parties are working on this, the overall implementation at regional level is very low, less than 40%. Moreover, very few Parties have used the Internet to develop resource kits for knowledge/information sharing among wetland managers, wetland users and decision-makers.

2.15 Financing the conservation and wise use of wetlands (Operational Objective 15)

70. In terms of promoting international assistance to support the conservation and wise use of wetlands, Japan, as the only donor Contracting Party in Asia, has been actively mobilizing funds for wetland conservation projects in developing countries. During the fiscal year 2001- 2003, as noted in Japan's National Report, a total of 32 technical cooperation projects related to the Ramsar Convention's objectives have been implemented. Japan has also been providing voluntary contributions to the Small Grants Fund - Japan recognizes the importance of the SGF for capacity building in developing countries and reports that it is planning to make efforts to provide voluntary contributions continuously

71. China has not only provided logistic support, but also financial support, to co-organizing the Asia COP9 Preparatory Meeting and two Himalayan Initiative workshops as well.

72. Our Parties have been very proactive in developing wetland conservation projects and in fundraising to implement them. The NR responses show that a majority of the developing countries have submitted proposals to development agencies, as well as to GEF, in the past three years. 75% of the Parties have successfully mobilized other sources of funding (other than development agencies and GEF) for wetland conservation in their country, and four Parties reported that they have taken steps to involve the private sector and private-sector funding for wetland conservation and wise use projects. In addition, about 70% of the Parties reported having worked with donors to mobilize resources to implement management plans of the Ramsar sites.

73. The Ramsar Secretariat would like to work in the future with the remaining five Parties that have not developed any wetland conservation project proposals for external funding. Some of them have real potential to draw the interests of donors.

2.16 Financing of the Convention (Operational Objective 16.1)

74. On average, Asia contributed 26% of the Ramsar core budget. Among 26 Parties, about 54% (14 Parties) have been paying their dues up to 2005, and another four have paid up at least to 2004. However, there are seven Parties that have not yet paid their dues for more than three years; some of them have never even paid their contributions since their accessions to the Convention.

2.17 Institutional and financial capacity of Contracting Parties (Operational Objective 18.1)

75. In general this strategy is being achieved well, with more than 90% of the Parties having reviewed their national institutions responsible for wetland conservation and wise use, or being in the process of doing so, and 56% of the Parties have established coordination committees among focal points of environment-related conventions. Such progress provides the mechanism to ensure the cooperation between the Ramsar AAs and other water- and biodiversity-related national institutions and the institutions for social and culture heritage.

76. We have to note that the number of Parties that have set up National Wetland Committees remains the same as reported to COP8, and there are still four Parties that have not done anything in this regard. However, on the positive side, among the 13 Parties that have such committees, 10 of them are intersectoral, with inclusion of major ministries, agencies, NGOs, local communities and private sectors, etc., and an additional two Parties are working towards this, while only one has failed to achieve it.

2.18 Training (Operational Objective 20.1)

77. Surprisingly, not a single Party has completed its assessment of training needs for the implementation of the Convention, though 58% of the Parties are working towards this. In general, Asia is not doing well on this objective. "Yes" answers to all the relevant indicators were reported by only a range of 5-33% of the Parties.

78. This situation may reflect the lack of training facilities or training centers in the region. It is strongly recommended to all Parties that any training programmes should be based on the training needs analysis.

2.19 Membership to the Convention (Operational Objective 21.1)

79. New Contracting Parties: Myanmar. Myanmar deposited its instrument of accession with the Director-General of UNESCO on 17 November 2004, and the Convention entered into force since 17 March 2005. The Government of Japan provided technical assistance to their accession.

80. Pre-accession countries: Afghanistan, Iraq, Kazakhstan, Lao PDR, Turkmenistan, Yemen

81. Asia still has 17 countries that have not yet ratified the Convention, which remains the largest regional gap for the Ramsar Convention's progress towards universal membership. However, we are making progress with at least with the Governments of Afghanistan, Iraq, Lao PDR, Kazakhstan, Turkmenistan, and Yemen.

82. The Lao PDR, with the assistance of IUCN, has organized a series of workshops on wetlands, and the Ramsar Secretariat was also very pleased to meet with their government delegation headed by their vice Prime Minister in 2004. To help with this process, a Ramsar SGF project was approved by Standing Committee in 2004.

83. Kazakhstan, with the help of a UNDP Kazakhstan wetland project, has made significant progress towards its ratification of the Convention. To help with the process, a Ramsar SGF project was approved by the Standing Committee in 2005.

84. In addition, we have been in discussions with the Governments of Afghanistan, Bhutan, Brunei, Iraq, Turkmenistan, and Yemen on their accessions. However, we have not received any positive signs from East Timor, Kuwait, Maldives, North Korea, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Singapore or UAE.


Annex I

Current situation of Ramsar sites in Asia

Site Name

Designation Date

site area (ha)

RIS and map status

Manag. Plan

Issues

RIS Update

 

1) Azerbaijan (2)

 

 

Agh-Ghol

21.05.2001

500

2005

no

 

OK

 

Ghizil-Agaj (former Kirov Bay)

21.05.2001

99060

2005

 

 

no

 

OK

 

2) Bahrain (2)

 

 

Hawar Islands

27.10.1997

5200

 

no

 

update map with a boundary of the site

 

Tubli Bay

27.10.1997

1610

 

no

 

updated RIS and map

 

3) Bangladesh (2)

 

Sundarbans Reserved Forest

5/21/1992

601700

2003

Yes

Potential threats from oil exploitation

 

 

Tanguar Haor

7/10/2000

9500

 

Yes

 

 

 

4) Cambodia (3)

 

Boeng Chmar and Associated River System and Floodplain

6/23/1999

28000

 

Yes

 

updated RIS and map

 

Koh Kapik and Associated Islets

6/23/1999

12000

 

Yes

 

updated RIS and map

 

Middle Stretches of Mekong River North of Stoeng Treng

6/23/1999

14600

 

no

 

updated RIS and map

 

5) China (30)

 

Xianghai

31.03.1992

105467

2005, but need revision

Yes

 

update RIS and map

 

Zhalong

31.03.1992

210000

10.1997

yes

Water diversion

updated RIS and map

 

Poyanghu

31.03.1992

22400

10.1997

yes

 

updated RIS and map

 

Dongdongtinghu

31.03.1992

190000

10.1997

yes

 

updated RIS and map

 

Niaodao (Bird Island)

31.03.1992

53600

10.1997

no

Avian flu leads to death of >1000 geese

updated RIS and map

 

Dongzhaigang

31.03.1992

5400

10.1997

yes

 

updated RIS and map

 

Mai Po Marshes and Inner Deep Bay

04.09.1995

1513

2005

yes

 

 

 

Chongming Dongtan

11.01.2002

32600

 

Yes

 

 

 

Dafeng

11.01.2002

78000

 

yes

 

 

 

Dalai Lake

11.01.2002

740000

 

yes

 

 

 

Dalian National Spotted Seal Nature Reserve

11.01.2002

11700

 

yes

 

 

 

Eerduosi National Nature Reserve

11.01.2002

7680

 

Yes

Water quality & qantity

 

 

Honghe

11.01.2002

21836

 

yes

 

 

 

Huidong Harbor Sea Turtle National Nature Reserve

11.01.2002

400

 

no

 

 

 

Nan Dongting Wetland and Waterfowl Reserve

11.01.2002

168000

 

yes

 

 

 

San Jiang National Nature Reserve

11.01.2002

164400

 

no

 

 

 

Shankou Mangrove Nature Reserve

11.01.2002

4000

 

no

 

 

 

Xi Dongting Lake (Mupinghu)Nature Reserve

11.01.2002

35000

 

yes

 

 

 

Xingkai Lake National Nature Reserve

11.01.2002

222488

 

no

 

 

 

Yancheng National Nature Reserve

11.01.2002

453000

 

yes

 

 

 

Zhanjiang Mangrove National Nature Reserve

11.01.2002

20279

 

no

 

 

 

Bitahai

07.12.04

1985

 

yes

 

 

 

Dashanbao

07.12.04

5958

 

Yes

 

 

 

Eling lake

07.12.04

65,907

 

Yes

 

 

 

Lashihai

07.12.04

3560

 

Yes

 

 

 

Maidika

07.12.04

43496

 

No

 

 

 

Mapangyong Cuo

07.12.04

73,782

 

No

 

 

 

Napahai

07.12.04

2083

 

Yes

 

 

 

Shuangtai Estuary

07.12.04

128,000

 

Proposed

 

 

 

Zhaling Lake

07.12.04

64,920

 

Yes

 

 

 

6) India (19 + 5)

 

Chilika Lake

01.10.1981

116500

1981

yes

 

RIS and map update

 

Keoladeo National Park

01.10.1981

2873

1981

yes

Complaint on water issues

RIS and map update and MR questionnaire

 

Wular Lake

23.03.1990

18900

1989

yes

 

RIS and map update

 

Harike Lake

23.03.1990

4100

1989

yes

 

RIS and map update

 

Loktak Lake

23.03.1990

26600

1989

yes

 

RIS and map update and MR questionnaire

 

Sambhar Lake

23.03.1990

24000

1989

no

 

RIS update

 

Kanjli

22.01.2002

183

 

yes

 

 

 

Ropar

22.01.2002

1365

 

yes

 

 

 

Ashtamudi Wetland

19.08.2002

61400

 

yes

 

 

 

Bhitarkanika Mangroves

19.08.2002

65000

 

yes

 

 

 

Bhoj Wetland

19.08.2002

3201

 

yes

 

 

 

Deepor Beel

19.08.2002

4000

 

?

 

 

 

East Calcutta Wetlands

19.08.2002

12500

 

no

Industrial development within site

 

 

Kolleru Lake

19.08.2002

90100

 

yes

NGO complains on water quality, wetland reclamation

 

 

Point Calimere Wildlife and Bird Sanctuary

19.08.2002

38500

 

no

 

 

 

Pong Dam Lake

19.08.2002

15662

 

yes

 

 

 

Sasthamkotta Lake

19.08.2002

373

 

no

 

 

 

Tsomoriri

19.08.2002

12000

 

yes, some

 

 

 

Vembanad-Kol Wetland

19.08.2002

151,250

 

no

 

 

 

7) Indonesia (2+1)

 

Berbak

08.04.1992

162,700

1991

yes

 

RIS and map update

 

Danau Sentarum

30.08.1994

80000

1997

not fully

 

RIS and map update

 

8) Islamic Republic of Iran (22)

 

Miankaleh Peninsula, Gorgan Bay and Lapoo-Zaghmarz Ab-bandan

23.06.1975

100,000

2005

yes

 

OK

 

Lake Parishan and Dasht-e-Arjan

23.06.1975

6200

2005

yes

 

OK

 

Lake Urmia [or Orumiyeh]

23.06.1975

483,000

2005

yes

 

OK

 

Neiriz Lakes & Kamjan Marshes

23.06.1975

108,000

2005

yes

 

 

 

Anzali Mordab (Talab) complex

23.06.1975

15000

2005

prepared

 

 

 

Shadegan Marshes & mudflats of Khor-al Amaya & Khor Musa

23.06.1975

400000

2005

no

Water diversion/ chemical pollution for Iran-Iraq war

 

 

Hamun-e-Saberi & Hamun-e-Helmand

23.06.1975

50000

2005

no

Severe water shortage for diversion & irrigation, lakes are almost. Negotiations on flow, btw Afghanistan & Iran, is on-going.

 

 

Lake Kobi

23.06.1975

1200

2005

no

 

 

 

Hamun-e-Puzak, south end

23.06.1975

10000

2005

no

Almost dried-up

 

 

Shurgol, Yadegarlu & Dorgeh Sangi Lakes

23.06.1975

2500

2005

No/ planned to consider in Integrated mgt. plan with Lake Orumyeh

 

 

 

Bandar Kiashahr Lagoon and mouth of Sefid Rud

23.06.1975

500

2005

no

 

 

 

Amirkelayeh Lake

23.06.1975

1230

2005

no

 

 

 

Lake Gori

23.06.1975

120

2005

no

 

 

 

Alagol, Ulmagol and Ajigol Lakes

23.06.1975

1400

1997

no

MR questionnaire

 

 

Khuran Straits

23.06.1975

100000

2005

yes

 

 

 

Deltas of Rud-e-Shur, Rud-e-Shirin and Rud-e-Minab

23.06.1975

45000

2005

no

 

 

 

Deltas of Rud-e-Gaz and Rud-e-Hara

23.06.1975

15000

2005

yes, prepared

 

 

 

Gavkhouni Lake and marshes of the lower Zaindeh Rud

23.06.1975

43000

2005

no

 

 

 

Govater Bay and Hur-e-Bahu

01.11.1999

75000

1999

no

 

 

 

Sheedvar Island

29.12.1999

870

1999

no

 

 

 

Gomishan Lagoon

05.11.2001

17700

2001

no

 

 

 

Fereydoon Kenar, Ezbaran & Sorkh Ruds Ab-Bandans

28.03.2003

5427

2005

no

 

 

 

9) Israel (2)

 

En Afeq Nature Reserve

12.11.1996

66

1996

yes

 

update RIS and map

 

Hula Nature Reserve

12.11.1996

300

1996

yes

 

update RIS and map

 

10) Japan (13 + 13 ? )

 

Kushiro-shitsugen

17.06.1980

7863

1999

yes

 

 update RIS and map

 

Izu-numa and Uchi-numa

13.09.1985

559

1992

under preparation (COP8)

 

update RIS and map

 

Kutcharo-ko

06.07.1989

1607

1992

Master-plans being developed (COP8)

 

update RIS and map

 

Utonai-ko

12.12.1991

510

1992

under preparation (COP8)

 

update RIS and map

 

Kiritappu-shitsugen

10.06.1993

2504

1993

under preparation (COP8)

 

update RIS and map

 

Akkeshi-ko and Bekambeushi-shitsugen

10.06.1993

4896

1993

under preparation (COP8)

 

update RIS and map

 

Yatsu-higata

10.06.1993

40

1993

Master-plans available

 

update RIS and map

 

Katano-kamoike

10.06.1993

10

1993

under preparation

 

update RIS and map

 

Biwa-ko

10.06.1993

65602

1993

under preparation

 

update RIS and map

 

Sakata

28.03.1996

76

1995

yes

 

update RIS and map

 

Manko

15.05.1999

58

1999

under preparation

 

update RIS and map

 

Fujimae-Higata

14.10.2002

323

2004

 

 

 

 

Miyajima-numa

14.10.2002

41

2002

 

 

 

 

11) Jordan (1)

 

Azraq Oasis

10.01.1977

7372

1998

only partially

over-extraction of water

update RIS and map

 

12) Republic of Korea (3)

 

The High Moor, Yongneup of Mt. Daeam

3/28/1997

106

 

Yes

Human-induced negative impact

update RIS and map

 

Woopo Wetland

3/2/1998

854

 

Yes

Dyke Construction

update RIS and map

 

Jando Island High Moor

30/03/05

9

 

no

 

 

 

13) Kyrgyz Republic (1+1)

 

Isyk-Kul State Reserve with the Lake Isyk-Kul

12/11/02

623,600

 

yes

 

 

 

14) Lebanon (4)

 

Ammiq Wetland

16.04.1999

280

Never finalised

Yes

problems with area (initially designated as 280ha, then 2,400)

RIS and map need to be finalized, the area clarified

 

Deir el Nouriyeh cliffs of Ras Chekaa

16.04.1999

Not known

1996

No

 

update RIS and map

 

Tyre Beach

16.04.1999

380

1996

yes

pollution, increased tourism

update RIS and map

 

Palm Islands Nature Reserve

03.08.2001

415

2001

yes

Over fishing

 

 

15) Malaysia (4 +?)

 

Tasek Bera

10.11.1994

38446

1998

Yes

 

update RIS and map

 

Pulau Kukup

31.01.2003

647

2003

yes

 

 

 

Sungai Pulai

31.01.2003

9126

2003

yes

 

 

 

Tanjung Piai

31.01.2003

526

2003

yes

Coastal erosion by ship waves

 

 

16) Mongolia (11)

 

Mongol Daguur (Mongolian Dauria)

08.12.1997

210000

1997

no

 

update RIS and map

 

Terhiyn Tsagaan Nuur

06.07.1998

6110

1998

no

 

update RIS and map

 

Valley of Lakes

06.07.1998

45600

1998

no

 

update RIS and map

 

Ogii Nuur

06.07.1998

2510

1998

no

 

update RIS and map

 

Har Us Nuur National Park

13.04.1999

321360

1999

in preparation

Potential threats by dam

update RIS and map

 

Ayrag Nuur

13.04.1999

45000

1999

No

 

update RIS and map

 

Lake Achit and its surrounding wetlands

22.03.2004

73,730

2004

No

 

 

 

Lake Buir and its surrounding wetlands.

22.03.2004

104,000

2004

No

 

 

 

Lake Ganga and its surrounding wetlands

22.03.2004

3,280

2004

no, but to be developed by 2005

 

 

 

Lake Uvs and its surrounding wetlands

22.03.2004

585,000

2004

no, under preparation

 

 

 

Lakes in the Khurkh-Khuiten river valley

22.03.2004

42,940

2004

no

 

 

 

17) Myanmar (1)

Moyingyi Wetland Wildlife Sanctuary

17/11/04

256

 

Under prepara-tion

 

Yet to receive proper RIS

18) Nepal (4)

Koshi Tappu

17.12.1987

17500

1995

yes

 

update RIS and map

Beeshazar and Associated Lakes

13.08.2003

3200

2003

Yes

 

 

Ghodaghodi Lake Area

13.08.2003

2563

2003

yes

 

 

Jagadishpur Reservoir

13.08.2003

225

2003

no

 

 

19) Pakistan (19)

Thanedar Wala

23.07.1976

4047

 

 

 

update RIS and map

Chashma Barrage

22.03.1996

34099

 

 

 

update RIS and map

Taunsa Barrage

22.03.1996

6576

 

yes

 

update RIS and map

Tanda Dam

23.07.1976

405

 

no

 

update RIS and map

Uchhali Complex

22.03.1996

1243

 

yes

 

update RIS and map

Kinjhar (Kalri) Lake

23.07.1976

13468

 

no

 

update RIS and map

Drigh Lake

23.07.1976

164

 

no

 

update RIS and map

Haleji Lake

23.07.1976

1704

 

no

Over fishing, poaching, over water extraction

update RIS and map

Astola (Haft Talar) Island

10.05.2001

5000

2001

no

 

 

Hub (Hab) Dam

10.05.2001

27000

2001

yes

 

 

Indus Dolphin Reserve

10.05.2001

125000

2001

no

 

 

Jiwani Coastal Wetland

10.05.2001

4600

2001

no

 

 

Jubho Lagoon

10.05.2001

706

2001

no

 

 

Miani Hor

10.05.2001

55000

2001

 

 

 

Nurri Lagoon

10.05.2001

2540

2001

no

 

 

Ormara Turtle Beaches

10.05.2001

2400

2001

no

 

 

Deh Akro-II Desert Wetland Complex

05.11.2002

20500

2001

no

 

 

Indus Delta

05.11.2002

472800

2001

no

 

 

Runn of Kutch

05.11.2002

566375

2001

no

 

 

20) Philippines (4)

Olango Island Wildlife Sanctuary

01.07.1994

5800

1994

revised

 

update RIS and map

Naujan Lake National Park

12.11.1999

14568

1999

yes

 

 

Agusan Marsh Wildlife Sanctuary

12.11.1999

14836

1999

yes

 

 

Tubbataha Reefs National Marine Park

12.11.1999

33200

1999

yes

 

 

21) Sri Lanka (3)

Bundala

15.06.1990

6210

1989

yes

 

update RIS and map

Annaiwilundawa Tanks Sanctuary

03.08.2001

1397

2001

prepared but not implemented

 

 

Maduganga

11.12.2003

915

2003

yes

 

 

 

 

22) Syrian Arab Republic (1)

Sabkhat al-Jabbul Nature Reserve

05.03.1998

10000

1997

no

 

update RIS and map

23) Tajikistan (5)

Karakul Lake

18.07.2001

36400

not finalised

 

 

Send RIS and map

Kayrakum Reservoir

18.07.2001

52000

not finalised

 

 

Send RIS and map

Lower part of Pyandj River

18.07.2001

 

not finalised

 

 

Send RIS and map

Shorkul and Rangkul Lakes

18.07.2001

2400

not finalised

 

 

Send RIS and map

Zorkul Lake

18.07.2001

3800

not finalised

 

 

Send RIS and map

24) Thailand (10)

Kuan Ki Sian of the Thale Noi Non-Hunting Area Wetlands

13.05.1998

494

1997

yes

 

update RIS and map

Bung Khong Long Non-Hunting Area

05.07.2001

2214

2001

 

 

 

Don Hoi Lot

05.07.2001

87500

2001

yes

 

 

Krabi Estuary

05.07.2001

21299

2001

 

 

 

Nong Bong Kai Non-Hunting Area

05.07.2001

434

2001  (no map)

 

 

Send a map

Princess Sirindhorn Wildlife Sanctuary (Pru To Daeng Wildlife Sanctuary)

05.07.2001

20100

2001

yes

 

 

Had Chao Mai Marine National Park - Ta Libong Island Non-Hunting Area - Trang River Estuaries

14.08.2002

66313

2002

yes, prepared partially

Marine National Park,

 

Kaper Estuary - Laemson Marine National Park - Kraburi Estuary

14.08.2002

122046

2002

no

 

 

Mu Koh Ang Thong Marine National Park

14.08.2002

10200

2002

master plan is available

 

 

Pang Nga Bay Marine National Park

14.08.2002

40000

2002

 

Encroach-ment, massive tourism

 

25) Uzbekistan (1)

Lake Dengizkul

10/8/2001

31300

2003

no

 

 

26) Vietnam (1 +1)

Bau Sau

04/08/05

13,759

 

yes

 

 

Xuan Thuy Natural Wetland Reserve

20.09.1988

12000

1992

yes

 

update RIS and map


Annex II

Ramsar Sites designated since COP 8

No

 Country

Site Name

Site no.

Dd

Area (in ha.)

Under-represented wetyland types

Comments

1

China

Bitahai Wetland

1434

7/12/2004

1,985

 

high altitude

2

China

Dashanbao

1435

7/13/2004

5,958

 

high altitude

3

China

Eling Lake

1436

7/14/2004

65,907

 

 high altitude

4

China

Lashihai Wetland

1437

7/15/2004

3560

 

high altitud 

5

China

Maidika

1438

7/16/2004

43,496

 

high altitud 

6

China

Mapangyong Cuo

1439

7/17/2004

73,782

 

high altitud 

7

China

Napahai Wetland

1440

7/18/2004

2,083

 

high altitud 

8

China

Shuangtai Estuary

1441

7/19/2004

128,000

 

 

9

China

Zhaling Lake

1442

7/20/2004

64,920

 

high altitud 

10

Iran

Fereydoon Kenar, Ezbaran & Sorkh Ruds Ab-Bandans.

1308

28/03/04

5427

 

 

11

Malaysia

Pulau Kukup

1287

1/31/2003

647

mangroves

 

12

Malaysia

Sungai Pulai

1288

1/31/2003

9126

mangroves

 

13

Malaysia

Tanjung Piai

1289

1/31/2003

526

mangroves

 

14

Mongolia

Lake Achit and its surrounding wetlands

1376

3/22/2004

73,730

 

high altitude 1,436

15

Mogolia

Lake Buir and its surrounding wetlands.

1377

3/22/2004

104,000

 

TS with China

16

Mogolia

Lake Ganga and its surrounding wetlands

1378

3/22/2004

3,280

 

high altitude ca 1,295

17

Mogolia

Lake Uvs and its surrounding wetlands

1379

3/22/2004

585,000

 

TS with Russia

18

Mongolia

Lakes in the Khurkh-Khuiten river valley

1380

3/22/2004

42,940

 

 

19

Myanmar

Moyingyi Wetland Wildlife Sanctuary

1431

17/11/04

256

 

 

20

Nepal

Beeshazar and Associated Lakes

1313

8/13/2003

3200

 

 

21

Nepal

Ghodaghodi Lake Area

1314

8/13/2003

2563

 

 

22

Nepal

Jagadishpur Reservoir

1315

8/13/2003

225

 

 

23

Pakistan

Deh Akro-II Desert Wetland Complex

1283

11/5/2002

20500

 

 

24

Pakistan

Indus Delta

1284

11/5/2002

472800

 

 

25

Pakistan

Runn of Kutch

1285

11/5/2002

566375

 

 

26

Republic of Korea

Jangdo Island High Moor

1458

30/03/05

9

peatland

 

27

Sri Lanka

Maduganga

1372

12/11/2003

915

mangroves

 

28

Vietnam

Bau Sau

 to be announced

4/8/2005

12,000

 

 

29

Kyrgyz Republic

Chatyr-Kul

 to be announced

?

16100

 

 

30

Japan

coming soon

 

?

?

coral reef, mangrove, peatland

 

31

Japan

coming soon

 

?

?

 

 

32

Japan

coming soon

 

?

?

 

 

33

Japan

coming soon

 

?

?

 

 

34

Japan

coming soon

 

?

?

 

 

35

Japan

coming soon

 

?

?

 

 

36

Japan

coming soon

 

?

?

 

 

37

Japan

coming soon

 

?

?

 

 

38

Japan

coming soon

 

?

?

 

 

39

Indonesia

Wasur NP

 to be announced

?

413,810

mangroves

 

40

India

Renuka Wetland

 to be announced

08/11/05

20

low amount of non-forested peatlands

 

41

India

Chandertal Wetland

 to be announced

08/11/05

49

wet grasses

 

42

India

Rudrasagar Lake

 to be announced

08/11/05

240

 

 

43

India

Hokera Wetland

 to be announced

08/11/05

1375

peatswamp forest

 

44

India

Surinsar-Mansar Lakes

 to be announced

08/11/05

349.8

 

 

45

India

Upper Ganga River

 to be announced

08/11/05

26590

 

 


Annex III

The Chilika Statement

We, the 400 participants from 32 countries, at the Asian Wetland Symposium 2005, having met at Bhubaneswar and Chilika, Orissa, India, from 6-9 February 2005, hereby RECOGNISE:

That wetlands in Asia have traditionally provided people with ecological security and livelihood support through their natural processes and functions; increasing population pressures and lack of awareness about the role of wetlands have led to degradation of wetlands and increased vulnerability for local users; there is an urgent need to address the challenges posed by unbalanced sectoral development, poverty and inadequate capacity for effective restoration and management of wetlands;

That building upon the Asian Wetland Symposia of 1992 and 2001 and their recommendations that provided an effective mechanism for promoting conservation and wise use of wetlands in Asia through networking of international and national organizations and individuals, new strategic directions, partnerships and pioneering examples of community-based management are emerging through sharing of experiences and knowledge within the region;

That Chilika Lagoon in India is an outstanding example of wetland conservation and wise use following the principles of integrated management with strong emphasis on local people's participation and shared decision- making through networking of local, national and international experiences; restoration measures adopted have led to significant improvement in socio-economic conditions of communities dependant on Chilika Lagoon for livelihoods while maintaining ecological integrity;

That the recent tsunami in the Indian Ocean severely affected the coastal resource base and livelihoods of many people, and has posed new challenges for restoration of coastal wetlands, including mangroves, sea grasses, coral reefs and other related ecosystems.

Thus, we URGE:

That degradation of wetlands caused by unsustainable development be urgently halted and reversed, and knowledge based strategies and techniques be adopted for conservation and restoration of wetland ecosystems and livelihood improvement of communities; the cultural values of wetlands having great relevance to wetland communities be recognized and integrated into wetland management practices; mainstreaming of their ecological and socio economic values into developmental planning be promoted to achieve poverty alleviation and sustainable livelihoods.

Therefore, we CALL FOR ACTION:

That innovative ecosystem based approaches be adopted to promote wetland conservation and management to support sustainable livelihoods with emphasis on:

  • Maintenance of optimal environmental flows to ensure functional integrity of wetland ecosystems;
  • Promotion of biodiversity conservation and sustainable use of wetland resources incorporating traditional knowledge and wisdom of local people;
  • Documentation and sharing of cultural heritage and values to provide a platform for conservation and management;
  • Urgently supporting local livelihoods through traditional knowledge base and eco-enterprises, including eco-tourism, and promoting public-private partnerships for adding value to wetland products to generate additional income and thereby reduce pressures on wetland resources;
  • Strengthening of community based institutions and traditional resource user groups to ensure their rights and interests recognized in the process of planning, development and implementation of wetland management plans;
  • Mainstreaming wetlands into sectoral development planning at all levels to ensure sustainable development;
  • Adoption of wetland conservation and management policies, plans and strategies for the wise use of wetlands;
  • Identification, promotion, and replication of successful cases of partnerships for wetland management and conservation, and disseminating these examples at the local, national and regional levels;
  • Assignment of the highest priority to education and awareness activities as the foundation towards changing attitudes and perceptions towards sustainable wetland management;
  • Strengthening and development of capacity building programs for wetland managers, policy makers, planners, practitioners, media, decision makers and local communities;
  • Restoration of wetlands to maintain ecological integrity and productivity to sustain local livelihoods;
  • Urgent actions for rehabilitation of coastal wetlands affected by the tsunami to restore sustainable livelihoods of the affected communities and conservation of biodiversity;

And that the organizers seek the support and assistance of the Government of India and the Government of Japan to convey this Statement to the forthcoming Asian Regional Meeting on the Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971), the 9th Meeting of the Conference of the Contracting Parties to the Convention on Wetlands to be held in Kampala, Uganda in November 2005, and the 11th World Lake Conference to be held in Nairobi, Kenya in October 2005.

Bhubaneswar, 9 February 2005


Annex IV

Responses of the Asian Parties to key National Report indicators

Operational objectives 1.1 & 1.2: Wetland inventory, assessment and monitoring, with the focus on following 4 representative indicators:

Indicator

Description

Yes

Other positive

No

Total No NR

YES %

All Pos. %

 

1.1.1-1

Country has a comprehensive National Wetland Inventory

9

11

1

 21

42.90

95.20

1.1.1-2

Methodologies recommended in the Ramsar Framework for Wetland Inventory (Resolution VIII.6) were used for National Wetland Inventory

  5

4

2

 12

42.00

75.00

1.2.5-1

Assessment of the vulnerability of wetlands to change in ecological character were undertaken

3

4

2

 12

25.00

58.00

1.2.7-1

The water quality and quantity available to, and required by, wetlands has been assessed

4

14

3

 21

19.00

85.70

 

Operational objective 2.1+2.2: Develop, review, and implement national policies, to ensure that the wise use principle of the Convention is being effectively applied.

Indicator

Description

Yes

Other positive

No

Total No
NR

YES %

All Pos.  %

2.1.1-1

National Wetland Policy (or equivalent instrument) is in place

6

2

1

12

50.00

66.67

2.1.2-1

Wetlands issues have been incorporated into national strategies for sustainable development called for by WSSD

12

3

5

21

57.00

71.00

2.1.2-2

Wetlands issues have been incorporated into poverty eradication strategies

7

1

7

21*

47.00

53.00

2.1.2-3

Wetlands issues have been incorporated into water resources management and water efficiency plans

9

6

4

21

42.85

71.00

2.1.2-4

Wetlands issues (conservation, wise use, restoration/rehabilitation) have been integrated into other sectoral strategic or planning processes and documents at any of the following levels: national, regional, provincial and local

14

4

2

21

66.67

85.70

2.2.3-1

Legislation on Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) applicable to wetlands is in place

10

2

0

 12

84.00

100.00

* Israel, Japan, Republic of Korea, Malaysia, Thailand not applicable

Operational objective 3.1 -3.3: Review Ramsar wise use concept, Increase recognition of the significance of wetlands for reasons of water supply, coastal protection, flood defence, food security, poverty alleviation, cultural heritage, and scientific research.

Indicator

Description

Yes

Other positive

No

Total No
NR

YES %

All Pos. %

3.1.1-1

Work has been done to review the wise use concept, its applicability and its consistency with the objectives of sustainable development

6

3

3

12

50.00

75.00

 

3.2.1-1

Action has been taken to implement at national level the Guidelines for Global Action on Peatlands (Resolution VIII.17)

4

4

4

21*

33.33

66.67

 

3.3.1-1

Measures have been taken to protect wetlands which are of special significance for reasons of water supply, coastal protection, flood defense, food security, poverty alleviation, cultural heritage, and/or scientific research

5

4

0

12

42.00

75.00

 

3.3.3-2

The social and cultural heritage of wetlands is being taken into account in their wise use and management

7

3

0

12

58.00

84.00

 

r3.3.2-1

Actions have been taken to ensure that public institutions place emphasis on the hydrogeological, social, economic and environmental aspects of groundwater

3

6

1

12

25.00

75.00

 

r3.3.3-4

Cultural values of wetlands have been used as a tool to strengthen involvement of local stakeholders, particularly in wetland planning and management

3

6

0

12

25.00

75.00

 

3.3.4-1

Wise use wetland programmes and/or projects that contribute to poverty alleviation objectives and food and water security plans have been developed

5

4

2

12

42.00

75.00

 

3.3.5-1

Research has been promoted on the role of wetlands in any of the following areas: water supply, coastal protection, flood defence, food security, poverty alleviation, and cultural heritage

3

4

2

12

25.00

58.00

 

* 9 countries without peatland are not applicable

Operational objective 3.4: Integrate policies on the conservation and wise use of wetlands in the planning activities and decision-making processes at national, regional, provincial and local levels, all in the context of implementing IWRM.

Indicator

Description

Yes

Other positive

No

Total No
NR

YES %

All Pos. %

 

3.4.2-1

The Guidelines for integrating wetland conservation and wise use into river basin management (Ramsar Wise Use Handbook 4) have been used/applied

8

9

4

21

38.00

80.95

3.4.5-1

The Guidelines for integrating wetlands into integrated coastal zone management (Resolution VIII.4) have been used/applied

2

6

2

12*

20.00

80.00

3.4.6-1

The Guidelines for allocation and management of water for maintaining ecological functions of wetlands (Resolution VIII.1) have been used/applied in decision-making related to freshwater

4

10

5

21

19.00

66.67

* Nepal & Jordan not applicable

Operational objective 4: Wetland Restoration and rehabilitation

Indicator

Description

Yes

Other positive

No

Total No
NR

YES %

All Pos. %

4.1.2-1

Wetland restoration/rehabilitation programmes or projects have been developed

16

3

2

21

76.00

90.00

r4.1.8-2

Local communities and indigenous peoples have been involved in wetland restoration activities

4

6

1

12

33.00

84.00

Operational objective 5.1: Develop guidance and promote protocols and actions to prevent, control or eradicate invasive alien species in wetland systems.

Indicator

Description

Yes

Other Positive

No

Total No
NR

YES %

All Pos. %

r5.1.2-1

National policy, strategy and management responses to threats from invasive species have been developed and implemented

5

5

1

12

42.00

84.00

5.1.2-1

Practical guidance for the prevention, control and eradication of invasive species has been developed and disseminated

3

3

3

12

25.00

50.00


Operational objective 6.1: Encourage active and informed participation of local communities and indigenous people, including women and youth, in the conservation and wise use of wetlands, including in relation to understanding the dynamics of cultural values.

Indicator

Description

Yes

Other positive

No

Total No
NR

YES %

All Pos %

6.1.1-1

The guidance for the participation of local communities and indigenous people in wetland management has been applied

5

5

0

12

42.00

84.00

6.1.4-1

Public participation in decision-making with respect to wetlands has been promoted

7

3

1

12

58.00

84.00

6.1.4-3

Local stakeholders have been involved in the selection of new Ramsar sites

5

1

3

12

42.00

50.00

6.1.6-1

The guiding principles on cultural values (Resolution VIII.19) have been used or applied

4

10

4

21

19.00

66.67

6.1.6-3

Resource information and case studies on cultural aspects of wetlands have been compiled

2

10

4

21

10.00

57.00

Operational objective 7.1: Promote the involvement of the private sector in the conservation and wise use of wetlands.

Indicator

Description

Yes

Other positive

No

Total No
NR

YES %

All Pos %

7.1.1-1

The private sector has been encouraged to apply the wise use principle in activities and investments concerning wetlands

3

6

2

12

25.00

75.00

Operational objective 8.1: Promote incentive measures that encourage the application of the wise use principle and the removal of perverse incentives.

Indicator

Description

Yes

Other positive

No

Total No
NR

YES %

All Pos %

8.1.1-1

A review of positive and perverse incentive measures in relation to the conservation and wise use of wetlands has been completed

1

3

5

12

8.00

33.00

8.1.1-2

Actions have been taken to promote incentive measures which encourage conservation and wise use of wetlands

1

4

5

12

8.00

42.00

Operational objective 9.1: Assist in implementing at all levels the Convention's Communication, Education, and Public Awareness Programme.

Indicator

Description

Yes

Other positive

No

Total No
NR

YES %

All Pos %

r9.1.2-1

Wetland CEPA has been incorporated into sectorial policies, strategies, plans and programmes

4

6

0

12

33.00

84.00

r9.2.1-1

Pilot projects have been developed to evaluate different approaches for applying CEPA in promoting wise use of wetlands

5

6

10

21

24.00

52.00

r9.3.2-1

A National wetland CEPA Task Force has been established

2

5

14

21

9.52

33.33

r9.3.3-1

A National Action Plan for wetland CEPA has been developed

3

5

13

21

14.29

38.10

r9.7.3-1

CEPA expertise has been incorporated into catchment/river basin planning and management tools

4

5

12

21

20.00

45.00

r9.6.2-1

World Wetlands Day activities have been carried out

9

2

0

12

75.00

92.00

Operational objective 10.1: Apply the Strategic Framework and guidelines for the future development of the List of Wetlands of International Importance

Indicator

Description

Yes

Other positive

No

Total No
NR

YES %

All Pos %

10.1.1-1

A strategy and priorities have been established for further designation of Ramsar Sites, in application of the Strategic Framework for the Ramsar List

12

6

0

21

57.00

87.00

10.1.2-3

Designation of wetland types currently under-represented in the Ramsar List has been done

3

1

6

12

25.00

33.00

10.1.3-1

Designation of coastal and marine Ramsar sites has been done

7

2

0

12*

70.00

90.00

10.1.4-1

Designation of Ramsar sites supporting globally threatened species and species that are unique or endemic, or for which the territory supports a significant proportion of the global extent of the species, has been done

9

1

2

12

75.00

84.00

r10.1.4-1

Designation of Ramsar sites that form part of networks for migratory species has been done

7

1

4

12

58.00

66.67

* not applicable for Nepal and Jordan.

Operational objective 10.2: Maintain the Ramsar Sites Database Service and constantly update it with the best available information.

Indicator

Description

Yes

Other Positive

No

Total No NR

YES %

All Pos %

10.2.4-1

All required updates of the Information Sheet on Ramsar Wetlands have been submitted to the Ramsar Bureau

9

6

2

 

 

21

44.00

70.00

Operational objective 11.1: Maintain the ecological character of all Ramsar sites.

Indicator

Description

Yes

Other positive

No

Total No
NR

YES %

All Pos %

11.1.1-1

The measures required to maintain the ecological character of Ramsar sites have been defined and applied

3

8

0

12

25.00

92.00

r11.1.4-1

The wider management implications (e.g. agricultural practices, river basin management, coastal zone management) have been taken into account in preparing the management plans for Ramsar sites

6

4

1

12

50.00

84.00

11.1.5-2

Cross-sectoral site management committees established at Ramsar sites

5

5

0

12

42.00

84.00

11.1.2-1

The New Guidelines for management planning have been used in the development of management plans or strategies

6

11

3

21

28.00

80.00

Operational objective 11.2 : Monitor the condition of Ramsar sites, notify the Ramsar Secretariat without delay of changes affecting Ramsar sites as required by Article 3.2, and apply the Montreux Record and Ramsar Advisory Mission as tools to address problems.

Indicator

Description

Yes

Other positive

No

Total No
NR

YES %

All Pos %

11.2.1-1

Monitoring programs have established at Ramsar sites

5

5

 

12

42.00

84.00

11.2.4-1

Changes or likely changes (both positive and negative) in ecological character at Ramsar sites have occurred or may occur (Art. 3.2)

5

5

1

21

23.00

49.00

11.2.4-2

Changes or likely changes in ecological character of Ramsar sites have been reported to the Ramsar Bureau pursuant to Article 3.2

1

1

12

21

5.00

10.00

11.2.4-3

Ramsar sites were included in the Montreux Record since COP8

0

0

14

21

40.00

80.00

r11.2.8-1

Actions have been taken to address the issues for which Ramsar sites were listed in the Montreux Record

2

2

1

21*

40.00

80

r11.2.8-2

Actions taken to address issues at Montreux Record Ramsar sites have been communicated to the Ramsar Bureau

0

1

3

21**

0

20.00


*, **, both apply to 5 Parties only who have listed their sites on the Montreux Record.

Operational objective 12.1 + 12.3: International cooperation

Indicator

Description

Yes

Other positive

No

Total No
NR

YES %

All Pos %

12.1.1-1

All transboundary/shared wetland systems have been identified

6

3

8

21

28.00

42.00

12.3.2-1

Party has been involved in the development of a regional initiative in the framework of the Convention

15

2

3

21

70.00

80.00

Operational objective 13.1: Develop the capacity within, and promote cooperation among, institutions in Contracting Parties to achieve conservation and wise use of wetlands.

Indicator

Description

Yes

Other positive

No

Total No
NR

YES %

All Pos %

13.1.1-1

Mechanisms are in place at the national level for collaboration between the Ramsar Administrative Authority and the focal points of other multilateral environmental agreements (MEAs)

10

5

6

21

48.00

71.00

Operational objective 14.1: Promote the sharing of expertise and information.

Indicator

Description

Yes

Other positive

No

Total No
NR

YES %

All Pos %

14.1.1-1

Action has been taken to share knowledge at the global, regional and national level

7

2

13

12

58.00

75.00

14.1.3-1

Networks among wetlands sharing common features have been established for knowledge sharing and training

4

5

2

21

19.00

42.00

14.1.3-3

Twinning arrangements among wetlands sharing common features have been established for knowledge sharing and training

2

6

6

21

5.00

38.00

Operational objective 15.1: Promote international assistance to support the conservation and wise use of wetlands.

Indicator

Description

Yes

Other positive

No

Total No
NR

YES %

All Pos %

15.1.1-2

Other sources of funding being mobilized for wetlands issues

8

7

3

21*

42.00

79.00

15.1.8-1

Project proposals related to wetlands have been submitted to development assistance agencies

13

1

5

21**

65.00

70.00

15.1.9-1

Project proposals related to wetlands have been submitted to the Global Environment Facility (GEF)

13

1

5

21**

65.00

70.00

* Israel and Malaysia reported as not applicable
**not applicable for Japan

Operational objective 18.1: Develop the capacity within, and promote cooperation among, institutions in Contracting Parties to achieve conservation and wise use of wetlands.

Indicator

Description

Yes

Other positive

No

Total No
NR

YES %

All Pos %

18.1.1-1

A review of national institutions responsible for the conservation and wise use of wetlands has been completed

7

12

2

21

33.33

90.50

18.1.1-3

A coordinating committee among focal points of environment-related conventions is in place

6

6

7

21

28.00

56.00

18.1.1-5

Mechanisms are in place to ensure cooperation between the Ramsar Administrative Authority and other national institutions directly or indirectly responsible for wetland issues, in particular water and biodiversity

12

5

4

21

56.00

81.00

18.1.1-6

Mechanisms are in place to ensure cooperation between the Ramsar Administrative Authority and relevant professional, scientific or educational societies and agencies involved in wetland conservation or management, including social and cultural heritage is

11

4

3

21

51.00

71.00

18.1.2-1

A National Ramsar / Wetlands Committee (or equivalent body) is in place

13

4

4

21

62.00

81.00

18.1.2-2

If a Ramsar Committee exists, it is cross-sectoral (relevant ministries and agencies, NGOs, key stakeholders, local communities, private sector, etc.)

10

2

1

21*

77.00

92.00

* There are only 13 Parties that have National Ramsar/Wetland Committee in place.

Operational objective 20.1: Identify the training needs of institutions and individuals concerned with the conservation and wise use of wetlands.

Indicator

Description

Yes

Other positive

No

Total No
NR

YES %

All Pos %

20.1.2-1

An assessment has been completed of national and local training needs in the implementation of the Convention

0

7

5

12

0

58.00

20.1.5-1

Training modules and materials on wetland-related issues have been developed

3

6

1

12

25.00

75.00

20.1.6-1

Opportunities for manager training in the country have been provided

3

6

1

12

25.00

75.00

20.1.8-1

Support has been provided to the development of regional wetland training and research centres

3

2

10

21

15.00

24.00

20.1.9-1

The Party has participated in exchanges of information and expertise related to wetland training issues

4

3

4

12

33.00

58.00

For reasons of economy, this document is printed in a limited number, and will not be distributed at the meeting. Delegates are requested to bring their copies to the meeting and not to request additional copies.

Back to top
Follow us 
Ramsar Awards 

The Convention today

Number of » Contracting Parties: 168 Sites designated for the
» List of Wetlands of
International Importance
2,186 Total surface area of designated sites (hectares): 208,674,342

Ramsar Secretariat

Rue Mauverney 28
CH-1196 Gland, Switzerland
Tel.: +41 22 999 0170
Fax: +41 22 999 0169
E-Mail: ramsar@ramsar.org
Map: click here

Ramsar Forum: subscribe