Ramsar COP8 DOC. 28: Ramsar implementation in the Neotropical region

21/09/2002

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"Wetlands: water, life, and culture"
8th Meeting of the Conference of the Contracting Parties
to the Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971)
Valencia, Spain, 18-26 November 2002

Ramsar COP8 DOC. 28
Information Paper
English and Spanish only

Regional overview of the implementation of the Convention and its Strategic Plan 1997-2002: Neotropics

The National Reports upon which this overview is based can be consulted on the Ramsar Web site, on http://ramsar.org/cop8_nr_natl_rpt_index.htm

Contracting Parties in the Neotropics as of 31 August 2002: Argentina, Bahamas, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Jamaica, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Saint Lucia, Suriname, Trinidad & Tobago, Uruguay, Venezuela (24).

Contracting Parties whose National Reports are included in this analysis: Argentina, Bahamas, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Jamaica, Nicaragua, Panama, Peru, Suriname, Trinidad & Tobago, Uruguay, Venezuela (20).

Contracting Parties yet to submit National Reports: Belize and Paraguay.
The Dominican Republic and Saint Lucia are recent accessions to the Convention and are therefore not expected to submit an NR.


1. Main achievements since COP7 and priorities for 2003-2005

1.1 Main achievements since COP7

1. There are 32 countries in the Neotropics; 24 are already Contracting Parties. Three countries acceded to the Convention since COP7.

2. As of 31 August 2002 the Region has 100 Ramsar sites, covering an area of almost 26.5 million ha. This represents 25.6% of the world's wetlands of international importance. 36 new sites covering 14.7 million ha. were designated in the Neotropics since COP7, while the sites of Parque Nacional Laguna del Tigre in Guatemala and Palo Verde in Costa Rica were extended by 289,912 ha and 4,719 ha respectively. The new designations and site extensions represent a total increase of roughly 126% in Ramsar sites in the Neotropics since COP7.

3. In COP7 Resolution VII.12, Contracting Parties in the Neotropics committed themselves to designating 22 new sites - the total designated to August 2002 by Parties having made commitments was 21 sites. It must be noted however that both Argentina and Nicaragua designated a much larger number of sites than what they had committed to.

4. There are two subregional strategies for wetlands in existence in the Neotropics - one for Central America and one draft strategy for South America.

5. Colombia, Costa Rica, Peru and Trinidad and Tobago have National Wetland Policies (NWP), while Cuba and Nicaragua have policies in place that partially fulfil this task. Additionally, Brazil, Chile, Ecuador and Jamaica are in the process of elaborating their National Wetlands Policy.

6. There are 13 National Ramsar Committees or similar bodies in the Region, while 6 countries are preparing the establishment of their Committees.

7. The Neotropics Region currently has 4 sites in the Montreux Record in Argentina, Costa Rica, Guatemala, and Uruguay, the same number as at the time of COP7. However, one site was removed (Nariva Swamp, Trinidad y Tobago) in January 2002, while another one was added (Laguna de Llancanelo, Argentina) in July 2001.

8. Contracting Parties in the region have engaged in international cooperation efforts with international organizations such as the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD), The Nature Conservancy (TNC), Ducks Unlimited, and Conservation International (CI), as well as with regional initiatives such as the Wider Caribbean Action Plan.

9. The United States provided since 1999 $1,160,000 to support the Wetlands for the Future Initiate (WFF). So far WFF has provided $748,328 in funding for 82 projects in the Neotropics region and the rest has been provided to support projects in Mexico.

10. The Small Grants Fund funded 6 projects between 1999 and 2001 in the Neotropics.

11. The governments of Argentina, Canada, Norway, Spain, Sweden and the United States of America all contributed funds for the organization of regional and subregional meetings covering the Neotropics region.

1.2 Priorities for 2003-2005

From the analysis of the National Reports it is evident that the high percentage of implementation might be misleading, as the level of progress of many of the actions is different from country to country. As the present report format does not allow for a more objective analysis of status and trends of wetlands at the national level, the future reporting system should be modified to guarantee that Parties to the Convention will have a clearer picture of the key priorities to attain the sustainable use of wetlands in all their territory.

Based on the regional percentages of achievements for each action (see COP8 National Reports Statistics web page) of the future strategic plan (2003-2008), and on the Bureau's knowledge and experience in the region, the key priorities for the next triennium are listed here.

1. Undertaking National Wetlands Inventories.
2. Development of national wetlands strategies and policies.
3. Establishment of participatory National Wetland Committees.
4. Restoration of wetlands, in particular coastal sites.
5. Clearer definitions and procedures in environmental impact assessment and increased capacity for implementation and enforcement.
6. Identification and adoption of national incentives to promote rational use and conservation of wetlands.
7. Development of strategies for Communication, Education and Public Awareness (CEPA)
8. Implementation of Regional Wetland Strategies.
9. Design of new subregional strategies.
10. Removal of sites from the Montreux Record.
11. Designation of under-represented wetlands, particularly coastal sites and peatlands.
12. Preparation and implementation of participative integrated management plans for Ramsar sites and other wetlands in national territory.
13. Allocation of specific funds for wetlands' wise use.
14. Actions to mitigate the impact of climate change and sea level rise.
15. Private sector participation in management and conservation of wetlands.
16. Increased coordination between national focal points of other relevant environmental agreements/conventions, including Biodiversity, Desertification, Climate Change, Migratory Species, and the Cartagena Convention.

2. Implementation activities undertaken since COP7

This analysis has been prepared following the format of the proposed actions for the Strategic Plan 2003-2008. The bracketed numbers correspond to the reference section in the National Reports submitted by the Parties to the Bureau.

2.1 Inventory and assessment

2.1.A Wetland inventory [1.1]

Costa Rica, Chile, Guatemala and Trinidad & Tobago have prepared comprehensive wetland inventories with national coverage. Another nine Contracting Parties of the region (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Cuba, Ecuador, Suriname, Uruguay and Venezuela) have partial inventories or initiatives in progress. Thus, 65% of Parties in the Neotropics have made concerted efforts to accomplish this task, compared to 66% of Parties to the Ramsar Convention globally.

Similar results are found regarding national wetland databases, where four countries (Chile, Costa Rica, Cuba and Uruguay) reported having complete databases, while five additional ones (Brazil, Ecuador, Guatemala, Nicaragua and Trinidad & Tobago) reported having partial databases or having initiated efforts in this respect (45% of the region). This percentage is slightly below the global 56%.

2.1.B Wetland assessment [1.2]

45% of Contracting Parties in the Region have conducted regular internal reviews to identify factors potentially altering the ecological character of Ramsar sites, among them Argentina, Costa Rica, Cuba, Guatemala, Nicaragua, Panama, Peru, Trinidad & Tobago, and Uruguay. Globally, 54% of countries responded positively to this question.

Contracting Parties also reported changes in ecological character in the following Ramsar sites: Argentina -  Costa Atlántica de Tierra del Fuego, Laguna Blanca, and Laguna de Llancanelo; Costa Rica - Caño Negro, Palo Verde, and Terraba-Sierpe; Guatemala - Parque Nacional Laguna del Tigre; Nicaragua - Los Guatuzos; Panama - San San-Pond Sak; Perú - Santuario Nacional Lagunas de Mejía, Reserva Nacional de Junín, Zona Reservada Los Pantanos de Villa, Reserva Nacional de Pacaya Samiria, Paracas, Santuario Nacional Los Manglares de Tumbes, and Lago Titicaca (Peruvian Sector); Trinidad & Tobago - Nariva Swamp; and Uruguay - Bañados del Este y Franja Costera.

 2.2 Policies and legislation, including impact assessment and valuation

2.2.A Policy instruments for wetland wise use [2.1]

20% of Parties in the Neotropics (Colombia, Costa Rica, Peru and Trinidad & Tobago) have National Wetland Policies (NWPs) in place, while Cuba and Nicaragua have policy instruments that partly fulfill this task. Brazil, Chile, Ecuador and Jamaica have the development of an NWP underway, all to be in place within 1-2 years. Overall, 35% of Contracting Parties to the Convention have NWPs in place.

95% of Parties in the region have indicated in their National report that they take fully into consideration the Ramsar Convention obligations in their environmental policies, above the global 88%.

2.2.B Development, review and amendment of policies, legislation, institutions and practices [2.2]

55% of Contracting Parties have carried out complete reviews (Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Jamaica, Trinidad & Tobago and Uruguay), partial reviews (Argentina, El Salvador, and Nicaragua), or are currently reviewing (Guatemala and Venezuela) their laws and institutions related to wetlands. The regional percentage is similar to the global 57%.

A smaller percentage of all countries in the region (20%, including Colombia, Costa Rica, Peru and Trinidad & Tobago) have reviewed government plans and policies that might impact wetlands. In this respect, the global percentage of reviews is 29%.

40% of countries (Bahamas, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Jamaica, Uruguay and Venezuela) have completely or partially reviewed their national institutions related to wetlands in order to insure the resource availability for implementation of the Ramsar Convention. For all Ramsar Contracting Parties, the percentage is 50%.

65% of countries (Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Panama, Peru, Trinidad & Tobago, Uruguay and Venezuela) have the legal requirement to carry out an EIA in all likely cases of change in ecological character of all wetlands, including Ramsar Sites, which is slightly above the global 63%.

Yet only 40% of Parties in the region (Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Honduras, Panama, Trinidad & Tobago, and Venezuela) reported that they have actually carried out the required assessment in all likely cases of change in ecological character of Ramsar sites. The percentage from the Neotropics is slightly above the global 39%.

45% of Contracting Parties in the Region (Bahamas, Bolivia, Brazil, Costa Rica, Cuba, El Salvador, Honduras, Jamaica and Uruguay) require or partially require economic valuations as part of environmental impact assessments, below the 61% reported by all Contracting Parties.

2.3 Integration of wetland wise use into sustainable development

2.3.A Methodologies for wetland conservation and wise use [3.1]

30% of countries in the Neotropics (Argentina, Chile, Costa Rica, Colombia, Trinidad & Tobago and Venezuela) have carried out reviews of resource materials related to wetland management, policies and practices, which is considerably higher than the global 21% of all Ramsar Contracting Parties that have undertaken such reviews.

2.3.B Peatlands [3.2]

Cuba has planned to designate under-represented wetland types, including peatlands, within the next five years. These two countries represent 13.3% of the countries that gave special attention to under-represented wetland types. In addition, six sites containing peatlands (types U and Xp according to Ramsar site type classification nomenclature) were designated in Argentina, Bolivia, Colombia, Cuba and Nicaragua since COP7. The other countries (for example, Colombia) have recognized the importance of under-represented wetland types and will consider them for future designation once those inventorying efforts currently underway or in the planning stages are finalized. See additional reference to under-represented wetland types in section 2.10.A. and Table 1, where the presence of under-represented wetland types in new site designations is detailed.

2.3.C Recognition of wetland values and functions [3.3]

Potential sites for Ramsar designation were identified by 70% of the countries in the region. See section 2.10.A. Additionally, 50% of countries (Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Suriname, Trinidad & Tobago, and Venezuela) stated in their National Reports that they have implemented a systematic approach to identifying sites at national level. In using a systematic approach, some countries in the Neotropics highlighted the importance of more complete assessments of sites including both ecological and socioeconomic characterizations, as well as fostering research, training and public awareness. Globally, 61% of Parties have implemented this approach for site identification, which shows the important advance the Neotropics has made in this regard.

2.3.D Integration of wetland policies into broader planning and management from local to national scales [3.4]

95% of the Contracting Parties that submitted their National Report in the Neotropics have implemented or developed (wholly or in part) programs with varying percentages of national coverage using integrated management approaches for river basins or coastal zones. This compares extremely well to the 85% for all Contracting Parties of the Convention.

2.4 Restoration and rehabilitation [4.1]

Costa Rica, Cuba and Trinidad & Tobago have carried out assessments to identify priority wetlands for restoration or rehabilitation. Ten additional countries (Argentina, Bahamas, Brazil, Colombia, El Salvador, Jamaica, Nicaragua, Peru, Uruguay and Venezuela) have conducted partial actions in this area. The percentage of affirmative and partially affirmative responses (65%) is similar to the global trend in this respect (71%).

Contracting Parties gave a more positive response when detailing actions for restoration and rehabilitation of priority wetlands. Argentina, Bahamas, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, El Salvador, Jamaica, Nicaragua, Peru, Trinidad & Tobago, and Venezuela all reported carrying out projects in this respect.

60% of Parties in the region have resource information on wetland restoration, though the materials forwarded to the Ramsar Bureau are scarce. This represents a higher average than the percentage for all Parties (55%).

2.5 Invasive alien species [5.1]

There were no directly related questions on this issue in the National Report Format. However, 35% of Contracting Parties in the region (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Guatemala, and Venezuela) reported having resource materials related to invasive species, with Brazil giving additional general information on ongoing national programs that address this issue. Overall, 49% of Ramsar Contracting Parties reported having such resource materials.

2.6 Local communities, indigenous people, and cultural values [6.1]

17 Contracting Parties of the region (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Jamaica, Nicaragua, Panama, Peru, Suriname, Trinidad & Tobago, and Venezuela) promote local stakeholder management of wetlands; Bahamas and Bolivia have also carried out partial efforts in this respect. The Regional percentage of Parties engaged in full or partial promotion (95%) is above the global trend (87%).

There is widespread support in the Region for site managers in monitoring ecological character of Ramsar sites (85% of Parties; 90% including partial efforts). This is reinforced by comparing with the global percentages (77% and 81%, respectively).

40% of countries in the Neotropics (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Nicaragua and Panama) have wetland site management committees in place. Additionally, Chile, Ecuador, and Peru currently have efforts in progress. This compares somewhat unfavorably to the global 66%, and stresses the need to make strong efforts in the next triennium to achieve better involvement of local stakeholders.

65% of countries in the Region (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Guatemala, Nicaragua, Panama, Peru, Suriname, Trinidad & Tobago and Venezuela) support or have given partial support to the application of traditional knowledge and management practices. Globally, Contracting Parties have supported these initiatives at a similar rate (71%).

2.7 Private sector involvement [7.1]

75% of Parties in the Region (Argentina, Bahamas, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, Peru, Suriname and Venezuela) have made efforts to encourage private sector support for wetlands conservation. Of these countries, Costa Rica and Ecuador are still trying to formalize these efforts. Globally there is a similar trend, with 73% of all Contracting Parties having reported getting support from the private sector.

13 Parties in the Region (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Honduras, Ecuador, Nicaragua, Panama, Peru, Suriname and Venezuela) have made efforts to encourage private sector involvement in monitoring ecological character of Ramsar sites. The rate of 65% is significantly higher than the global 42%.

2.8 Incentives [8.1]

For the Neotropics only 15% of countries (Colombia, Costa Rica and Trinidad & Tobago) have carried out reviews of existing incentives measures. Venezuela has also carried out a partial review, while Suriname's review is ongoing. The global reviews of incentive measures also take place at the low rate of 21%.

In terms of actions to promote incentives Colombia reported to be starting adoption of a coherent framework for wetlands, while Bahamas, Cuba, Costa Rica, and Peru all reported to be carrying out partial actions already.

2.9 Communication, education, and public awareness (CEPA) [9.1]

As of 31 August 2002, the following countries had identified their CEPA focal points:

· CEPA government focal point: Argentina, Bahamas, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Honduras, Jamaica, Nicaragua, Panama, Peru, Suriname, Trinidad & Tobago, and Venezuela.
· CEPA non-government focal point: Argentina, Bahamas, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, Honduras, Jamaica, Nicaragua, Panama, Suriname, Trinidad & Tobago, and Venezuela.

This means that the percentage of countries from the Neotropics having provided information about their CEPA focal points has increased to date to 80% for government focal points and 75% for non-government focal points respectively, a remarkable achievement for the region.

40% of Contracting Parties in the region (Bahamas, Brazil, Costa Rica, Cuba, Panama, Peru, Uruguay and Venezuela) have carried out actions to identify regional CEPA needs. An additional Party (Guatemala) has conducted partial efforts. Globally, 50% of Contracting Parties have identified CEPA needs.

Similarly, 40% of countries (Argentina, Bahamas, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Nicaragua, Uruguay and Panama) have carried out actions to assist the development of international CEPA resource materials, while Chile currently has similar activities in progress. This compares favorably to the 35% of all Ramsar Parties.

35% of Contracting Parties in the Neotropics (Argentina, Bahamas, Brazil, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Panama and Trinidad & Tobago) have given support to international programmes that encourage transfer of information, knowledge and skills among wetland education centres and educators, lower than the 50% of Parties that have done so globally.

Colombia, Cuba, Peru, Uruguay and Venezuela (25% of Neotropics countries) have established task forces to undertake a review of national needs, capacities and opportunities in the field of wetland CEPA. Chile, Costa Rica and Nicaragua have partially considered reviews through their National Ramsar Committees. Globally, 22% of Contracting Parties have undertaken reviews.

40% of Parties (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, Nicaragua and Trinidad & Tobago) have established educational centers in wetland sites. Additionally, El Salvador and Peru are currently in the process of establishing some centers. The establishment of centers at global level has occurred in 57% of countries, which indicates a weakness of the Neotropics region in this area.

Only 8 countries (40%) have given partial support to wetlands CEPA in all facilities, while wetlandsissues have been partially incorporated into the curricula of 10 countries (50%). Globally, the figures correspond to 50% and 64% respectively.

40% of Contracting Parties in the Neotropics have taken steps to provide Internet access to Ramsar site managers, compared to 41% globally. Specifically for the region, 29 Ramsar site managers have Internet connection, while an additional 10 Ramsar sites have Internet access through the regional offices of the national Administrative Authority.

2.10 Designation of Ramsar sites

2.10.A Application of the Strategic Framework [10.1]

Contracting Parties in the Neotropics identified 108 wetland sites as possible future Ramsar sites.

70% of Parties in the Neotropics have complete (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, El Salvador, Guatemala, Panama, Trinidad & Tobago, and Uruguay) or partial (Ecuador, Nicaragua, Suriname) directories of potential Ramsar sites. Partial or complete directories have been completed in 80% of Ramsar Contracting Parties at the global level.

50% of countries (Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, Jamaica, Nicaragua, and Panama) have designated wetlands that had no previous protection. 14 sites were reported as not having any previous protection before their designation as Wetlands of International Importance. These countries also expressed the intention to designate a total of 21 that currently have no protection as Ramsar sites in the future. Some of the remaining countries have not carried out such designations as they prefer to use the Ramsar site designation as a reinforcement of already existing measures. However, the consideration of previously unprotected sites is still higher in the Neotropics than the global rate of 45%.

70% of countries (Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Jamaica, Nicaragua, Panama, Suriname, Trinidad & Tobago, and Venezuela) have also given special attention to identification of suitable sites with under-represented wetland types, almost identical to the 71% global rate. Jamaica has committed to designating one additional site with under-represented wetland types by March 2005.

Recognition of under-represented wetland types has improved steadily in the Neotropics region. Of the 36 sites designated as Ramsar sites since COP7, 31 have under-represented wetland types, many of which represent the dominant type present in the site. These include coral reefs, intertidal wetlands, karst, and peatlands. See Table 1 in Annex for details on the new Ramsar sites.

2.10.B Maintenance and use of the Ramsar Sites Database [10.2]

There are no Ramsar sites in the Neotropics that have pending RIS updates according to Res. VII.12 criteria. However, the Regional Team requested updates (July 2001) either for RIS files older than six years, incomplete RIS files, and/or sites with deficient maps. Table 2 details the requested updates, to 31 August 2002.

2.11 Management planning and monitoring of Ramsar sites

2.11.A Maintenance of the ecological character of all Ramsar sites [11.1]

70% of Parties in the Neotropics reported that they have documented measures to maintain ecological character of Ramsar sites (Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Costa Rica, Cuba, Honduras, Jamaica, Nicaragua, Panama, Trinidad & Tobago and Uruguay) or have made partial efforts (Brazil and Ecuador), a figure similar to the global rate of 77%.

40% of Parties in the region (Colombia, Cuba, El Salvador, Peru, Suriname, Trinidad & Tobago, Uruguay and Venezuela) have management plans in place for all their Ramsar sites. This percentage doubles the rate of Parties on a global scale that have complied with this point (20%). Additionally, to 31 August 2002, 60 out of 100 Ramsar sites in the Neotropics have management plans in place. See Table 3 in Annex for details on management plan status for all Ramsar sites in the region.

80% of countries (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, Peru, Trinidad & Tobago, Uruguay, and Venezuela) apply zoning measures wholly or in part to regulate activities in those wetlands where it is warranted. 40 Ramsar sites are reported as having zoning measures in place. Again, zoning measures are used by a higher percentage of countries than the global figure of 72%.

75% of countries (Argentina, Bahamas, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, El Salvador, Honduras, Panama, Peru, Trinidad & Tobago, Uruguay, and Venezuela) use strict protection measures to regulate activities in those wetlands where it is warranted. The global percentage is again lower at 72%. 37 Ramsar sites are also reported as covered by strict protection measures.

2.11.B Monitoring the condition of Ramsar sites (including application of Article 3.2 and Montreux Record) [11.2]

The Neotropics region had four Ramsar sites on the Montreux record at the time of COP7:


· Bañados del Este y Franja Costera, Uruguay. Designation: 22/05/84. Montreux Record: 04/07/90. Ramsar Advisory Missions: October 1988 and May 1993.
· Palo Verde, Costa Rica. Designation: 27/12/91. Montreux Record: 16/06/93. Ramsar Advisory Mission: March 1998.
· Laguna del Tigre, Guatemala. Designation: 26/06/90. Montreux Record: 16/06/93. Ramsar Advisory Mission: July 1997.
· Nariva Swamp, Trinidad & Tobago. Designation: 21/12/92. Montreux Record: 16/06/93. Ramsar Advisory Mission: May 1995.

Costa Rica and Guatemala informed in their National Reports that they have partly implemented the Ramsar Advisory Mission recommendations, and recognized the need for further actions to eventually remove their respective sites from the Montreux Record. Trinidad & Tobago reported the implementation of most measures - the site in question (Nariva Swamp) has since been removed from the Record, on 07/01/02. Following this important announcement, the Government of Trinidad & Tobago stated its commitment to the continued conservation and sustainable use of Nariva.

Argentina included the Ramsar site Laguna de Llancanelo on the Montreux Record on 02/07/01 (Designation: 08/11/95. Ramsar Advisory Mission: October 2001). Thus, the total number of Ramsar sites on the Montreux Record remains at four at the time of COP8.

See related indicator on regular internal reviews to identify factors potentially altering ecological character of Ramsar sites in section 2.1.B.

2.12 Management of shared water resources, wetlands and wetland species

2.12.A Inventory and integrated management of shared wetlands and hydrological basins [12.1]

Only 3 Contracting Parties (Bolivia, Costa Rica and Guatemala) reported carrying out cooperative management of shared wetlands, equivalent to 17% of the eligible countries in the region; this means that 12 countries in the region did not provide an answer to this particular question. Globally, 31% of Parties carry out cooperative management.

See additional related reference to integrated zone management in section 2.3.D.

2.12.B Cooperative monitoring and management of shared wetland-dependent species [12.2]

For the region, 60% of Parties (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Honduras, Jamaica, Nicaragua, Peru, Trinidad & Tobago, and Uruguay) gather bird population data regularly, while Bolivia and Cuba have carried out partial efforts. Of all these countries only Argentina, Chile and Uruguay report providing bird population data to Wetlands International. The global percentage of countries gathering data is 74%.

Bolivia and Peru carry out joint management of the Lago Titicaca Ramsar sites in each country. Costa Rica and Nicaragua cooperate on management of the Río San Juan Basin, which includes Ramsar sites on both countries. Uruguay's Laguna Merín (within the Bañados del Este y Franja Costera Ramsar site) has a Joint Binational Commission with Brazil for investment in development of the area.

2.12.C Support and promotion of regional arrangements under the Convention [12.3]

There is no regional agreement under Ramsar for the Neotropics.

2.13 Collaboration with other multilateral environmental agreements and institutions [13.1]

Only 20% of Contracting Parties gave consideration to the Joint Work Plan (JWP) between the Ramsar Convention and the CBD. Globally, the JWP has been reviewed in 29% of countries.

It was also highlighted in the National Reports that with the sponsoring of the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD) Cuba and Venezuela both organized a national workshop on synergies in November 2001, to identify and coordinate plans of actions between the different environmental conventions subscribed to by the countries. In El Salvador, the focal points of the Ramsar Convention, UNCCD, the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), and the Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) also organized a workshop of synergies among the four bodies.

Regarding coordination at the national level to implement the various multilateral agreements, please refer to section 2.18.

2.14 Sharing of expertise and information [14.1]

65% of Contracting Parties (Argentina, Bahamas, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, Nicaragua, Panama, Peru, Suriname and Trinidad & Tobago) carried out exchanges of information, technical assistance and expertise with regard to South-South cooperation. This is an encouraging sign of cooperation within the Neotropics region, as the global percentage of Parties carrying out these activities is only 41%.

35% of countries in the Neotropics (Bolivia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Nicaragua, Peru, Suriname, and Uruguay) have Ramsar sites twinned with those in other Contracting Parties. Additionally, Nicaragua has twinned sites with Ramsar sites in Lombardia, Italy, and Extremadura, Spain. Cuba's twinning of Ciénaga de Zapata with Mexico's Ría Lagartos Ramsar site has included exchanges of technical personnel. In Suriname, the Coppenamemonding Ramsar site (along with the Bigi Pan Multiple Use Management Area and the Wia-Wia Nature Reserve, both potential Ramsar sites) were twinned with the Minas Basin in Nova Scotia and Shepody Bay in the Province of Brunswick, Canada. At the same time, they were also listed as Western Hemisphere Shorebird Reserves. For all Contracting Parties of the Convention there is a slightly lower percentage (30%) of twinned sites.

2.15 Financing the conservation and wise use of wetlands

2.15.A Promoting international assistance to support the conservation and wise use of wetlands [15.1]

70% of Contracting Parties in the region (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, El Salvador, Jamaica, Panama, Suriname, Trinidad & Tobago and Venezuela) had project proposals submitted to funding agencies which were intended to assist Ramsar implementation.

Development assistance agencies allocated funds for wetland related projects on a regular basis to 45% of Contracting Parties in the Neotropics, in contrast to 39% of all Ramsar member countries.

40% of Contracting Parties in the Neotropics (Brazil, Bolivia, Colombia, Cuba, Chile, Guatemala, Nicaragua and Venezuela) are represented in governing bodies or scientific advisory bodies of multilateral donor institutions or the GEF. In the National Reports only 35% of the Contracting Parties at the global level reported that they were represented in the governing bodies.

In its National Report El Salvador highlighted that using support from the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the CBD, the Ramsar Convention, UNCCD, and UNFCCC, the national focal points in the country have applied for GEF funding to carry out a joint project in the Humedal Cerrón Grande site.

2.15.B Environmental safeguards and assessments as part of all development projects (including foreign and domestic investments) affecting wetlands [15.2]

Requirements of EIA for Contracting Parties are covered in section 2.2.B.

2.16 Financing of the Convention [16.1]

In the National Reports, 45% of Contracting Parties in the Neotropics reported being up to date with their contributions to the Convention, compared to a global total of 60% of all Parties. However, a review of the state of contributions as of 31 August 2002 reveals that 60% of Contracting Parties in the Region (Bahamas, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Guatemala, Jamaica, Panama, Peru, Suriname and Trinidad & Tobago) are now up to date with their contributions to the Convention. Cuba, the Dominican Republic, and Saint Lucia, as new Parties to the Convention, were not expected to make any payments for 2001.

Contracting Parties contributed generously for the organization of Regional and Subregional Meetings covering the Neotropics region. The South American Regional Meeting in Buenos Aires (10-12 September 2001) was funded with a $60,000 contribution from the Government of Argentina. The Regional Meeting for Central America, the Caribbean and North America, in San Pedro Sula, Honduras (26-28 September 2001) was made possible through the contributions of the Canadian Wildlife Service ($5,960), Norway's Ministry of Environment ($14,455), the Swedish International Development Agency ($13,686), and the United States of America ($50,000). Finally, the Pan-American Regional Meeting in Guayaquil, Ecuador (1-5 July 2002) was funded by the Canadian Wildlife Service ($6,412), Spain's Ministry of Environment ($29,799), and the United States of America ($100,000).

2.17 Institutional mechanisms of the Convention [17.1]

Relevant questions in National Reports cross-referenced to section 2.18 below.

2.18 Institutional and financial capacity of Contracting Parties [18.1]

30% of the Contracting Parties in the Neotropics (Bahamas, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Uruguay and Venezuela) have reviewed their national institutions related to wetlands in order to improve implementation of the Convention, while two additional Parties (Brazil and Jamaica) have carried out partial efforts in this respect. The global percentage of countries conducting reviews was 45%.

Argentina, Brazil, Bahamas, Chile, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, Guatemala, Nicaragua, Panama, Trinidad & Tobago, Uruguay and Venezuela have in place a National Ramsar Committee (NRC) or similar body. Bolivia, Colombia, El Salvador, Honduras, Jamaica, and Peru are currently making progress in establishing their Committees. Thus, 95% of Contracting Parties have either an NRC or similar body, or have its establishment in progress, compared to 80% of all countries Party to the Convention.

For the coordination and integration in implementing international and regional conventions and treaties, 80% of the Parties in the Region reported having a mechanism for this purpose, usually through the Ministry of Environment, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, or a special inter-ministerial committee. There is a much higher consideration for multilateral initiatives in the Neotropics, as the global percentage is 58%.

90% of Contracting Parties in the Neotropics (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Jamaica, Nicaragua, Panama, Peru, Suriname, Trinidad & Tobago, and Venezuela) stated that they allocate funds for conservation and wise use of wetlands. The allocations have taken place in all countries as part of broader allocations for the environment or as part of cross-sectoral and cross-ministerial initiatives and programs. Globally, 78% of Contracting Parties have reported allocations for wetlands. In the case of Costa Rica and Trinidad & Tobago, both have a separate government allocation specifically earmarked for wetlands.

2.19 Working with International Organization Partners (IOPs) and others [19.1]

50% of Contracting Parties in the Neotropics (Argentina, Bahamas, Bolivia, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, El Salvador, Peru, and Uruguay) coordinate actions with Ramsar's International Organization Partners, either through the latter's membership in National Ramsar Committees and similar bodies, or through direct joint projects with, in particular, WWF and IUCN Regional Offices. There is similar coordination with IOPs in 43% of all Contracting Parties.

2.20 Training [20.1]

Only 15% of countries in the Neotropics (Colombia, Costa Rica and Cuba) have carried out the analysis of training needs for implementing wise use guidelines, as opposed to 26% of countries globally. The same three Contracting Parties, as well as Nicaragua, Trinidad & Tobago, and Uruguay have reviewed their training opportunities, while Panama has its review currently in progress. They in turn represent 35% of the countries in the region, whereas 36% of countries have done so globally.

40% of the Parties in the region have developed (Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Guatemala and Venezuela) or are currently developing (Argentina and Peru) training activities and modules related to wetlands. This is comparable to the global percentage of 40%.

45% of the Parties (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Costa Rica, Cuba, Guatemala, Honduras, Suriname and Trinidad & Tobago) have also provided training to wetland managers through personnel exchanges, again similar to the global figure, 52%.

All Contracting Parties in the Region have received support from the Wetlands for the Future Initiative.

2.21 Membership of the Convention [21.1]

Only Trinidad & Tobago undertook serious efforts to recruit new CPs into the Convention between 1999-2002. This represents only 7% of the countries of the region for which the question was applicable, which is extremely low compared to the global percentage of 46%.

Since COP7 Cuba (12/04/01), the Dominican Republic (15/05/02), and Saint Lucia (19/02/02) have become new Contracting Parties in the Neotropics region, as of 31 August 2002.


Annex

Summary statistics

Table 1 - Neotropics Sites designated since COP 7

Country

Site name

Designation date

Area (in ha.)

Under-represented wetland types

Argentina

Jaaukanigás

10.10.01

492,000

Ts

Argentina

Lagunas de Guanacache

14.12.99

580,000

Ts,U

Argentina

Lagunas y Esteros del Iberá

18.01.02

24,550

Ts

Argentina

Lagunas de Vilama

20.10.00

157,000

U

Argentina

Bañados del Río Dulce y Laguna de Mar Chiquita

28.05.02

996,000

Ts

Bolivia

Cuenca de Tajzara

13.06.00

5,500

U

Bolivia

Bañados del Izogog and Rio Parapeti

17.09.01

615,882

none

Bolivia

Palmar de las Islas y las Salinas de San José

17.09.01

856,754

Ts

Bolivia

Pantanal Boliviano

17.09.01

3,189,888

Ts

Bolivia

Laguna Concepción

06.05.02

31,124

Ts

Bolivia

Lagos Poopó y Uru Uru

11.07.02

967,607

Zg

Brazil

Baixada Maranhense Environmental Protection Area

29.02.00

1,775,036

I,Ts

Brazil

Par.Est.Mar. do Parcel Manoel Luís incl. the Baixios do Mestre Alvaro and Tarol

29.02.00

34,556

C

Colombia

Laguna de la Cocha

08.01.01

39,000

U

Costa Rica

Cuenca Embalse Arenal

07.03.00

67,296

none

Costa Rica

Laguna Respringue

06.05.99

75

A

Costa Rica

Manglar de Potrero Grande

06.05.99

139

I

Cuba

Ciénaga de Zapata

12.04.01

452,000

B,C,G,I,Ts,U,Xp,Zk

Dominican Republic

Lago Enriquillo

15.05.02

20,000

none

Ecuador

Abras de Mantequilla

14.03.00

22,500

Ts

Ecuador

Isla Santay

31.10.00

4,705

G,I

Ecuador

La Segua

07.06.00

1,836

Ts

Ecuador

Laguna de Cube

02.02.02

113

Ts

Ecuador

Refugio de Vida Silvestre Isla Santa Clara

02.02.02

46

none

Peru

Complejo de humedales del Abanico del río Pastaza

05.06.02

3,827,329

Ts

Guatemala

Punta de Manabique

28.01.00

132,900

B,I

Honduras

Sistema de Humedales de la Zona Sur de Honduras

10.07.99

69,711

B,G,I

Nicaragua

Cayos Miskitos y Franja Costera Immediata

08.11.01

85,000

B,C,G,I,Ts,Zk

Nicaragua

Deltas del Estero Real y Llanos de Apacunca

08.11.01

81,700

I

Nicaragua

Lago de Apanás-Asturias

08.11.01

5,415

none

Nicaragua

Refugio de Vida Silvestre Río San Juan

08.11.01

43,000

I,U

Nicaragua

Sistema de Humedales de la Bahía de Bluefields

08.11.01

86,501

I,Ts

Nicaragua

Sistema de Humedales de San Miguelito

08.11.01

43,475

Ts

Nicaragua

Sistema Lagunar de Tisma

08.11.01

16,850

Ts

St. Lucia

Mankotè Mangrove

19.02.02

60

A, B, C and I

St. Lucia

Savannes Bay

19.02.02

25

A, B, C and I

TOTAL

Key for under-represented wetland types:

Marine/Coastal Wetlands:
A Permanent shallow marine waters in most cases less than six metres deep at low tide; includes sea bays
and straits.
B Marine subtidal aquatic beds; includes kelp beds, sea-grass beds, tropical marine meadows.
C Coral reefs.
G Intertidal mud, sand or salt flats.
I Intertidal forested wetlands; includes mangrove swamps, nipah swamps and tidal freshwater swamp
forests.
Zk(a) Karst and other subterranean hydrological systems, marine/coastal

Inland Wetlands:
Ts Seasonal / intermittent fresh water marshes/pools on inorganic soils; includes sloughs, potholes,
seasonally flooded meadows, sedge marshes.
U Non-forested peatlands; includes shrub or open bogs, swamps, fens.
Xp Forested peatlands; peatswamp forests.
Zk(b) Karst and other subterranean hydrological systems, inland.

Human-made Wetlands:
Zk(c) Karst and other subterranean hydrological systems, human-made.

Table 2 - Update Status of Ramsar Information Sheets (RIS) and Maps

Country

Site Name

AREA (ha)

Last RIS update

Comments

Argentina

Laguna Blanca

11,250

1992

RIS requires up-date. 

 

Laguna de Llancanelo

65,000

1995

RIS requires up-date. 

 

Laguna de los Pozuelos

16,224

1992

RIS requires up-date. 

 

Reserva Costa Atlántica de Tierra del Fuego

28,600

1995

RIS requires up-date. 

 

Río Pilcomayo

55,000

1992

RIS requires up-date. 

 

Lagunas de Vilama

157,000

2000

Map requires up-date. 

Chile

Humedal el Yali

520

1996

RIS requires up-date. 

 

Laguna del Negro Francisco y Laguna Santa Rosa

62,460

1996

RIS requires up-date. 

 

Salar de Surire

15,858

1996

RIS requires up-date. 

 

Salar de Tara

5,443

1996

RIS requires up-date. 

 

Salar del Huasco

6,000

1996

RIS requires up-date. 

 

Sistema hidrológico de Soncor

5,016

1996

RIS requires up-date. 

Costa Rica

Caño Negro

9,969

1991

RIS requires up-date. 

 

Gandoca-Manzanillo

9,445

1995

RIS requires up-date. 

 

Humedal Caribe Noreste

75,310

1996

RIS requires up-date. 

 

Tamarindo

500

1993

RIS requires up-date. 

 

Terraba-Sierpe

30,654

1995

RIS requires up-date. 

El Salvador

Area Natural Protegida Laguna del Jocotal

1,571

1999

Map requires up-date. 

Guatemala

Refugio de Vida Silvestre Bocas del Polochic

21,227

1996

RIS requires up-date.

Honduras

Barras de Cuero y Salado

13,225

1993

RIS and map require up-date. 

 

Parque Nacional Jeanette Kawas

78,150

1995

RIS and map require up-date. 

 

Refugio de Vida Silvestre Punta Izopo

11,200

1996

RIS requires up-date. 

Panama

Golfo de Montijo

80,765

1990

RIS and map require up-date. 

 

Punta Patiño

13,805

1993

RIS and map require up-date. 

 

San San-Pond Sak

16,414

1993

RIS and map require up-date. 

Paraguay

Estero Milagro

25,000

1995

RIS and map require up-date. 

 

Lago Ypoá

100,000

1995

RIS and map require up-date. 

 

Río Negro

370,000

1995

RIS and map require up-date. 

 

Tinfunque

280,000

1995

RIS and map require up-date. 

Peru

Lago Titicaca (Peruvian sector)

460,000

1996

RIS requires up-date. 

 

Paracas

335,000

1992

RIS and map require up-date. 

 

Pacaya-Samiria

2,080,000

1992

RIS and map require up-date.

 

Lagunas de Mejía

691

2001

Map requires up-date.

 

Reserva Nacional de Junín

53,000

1996

RIS requires up-date.

 

Santuario Nacional Los Manglares de Tumbes

2,972

1996

RIS requires up-date.

 

Zona Reservada Los Pantanos de Villa

396

1996

RIS requires up-date.

Venezuela

Archipiélago Los Roques

213,220

1996

RIS requires up-date.

 

Ciénaga de Los Olivitos

26,000

1996

RIS and map require up-date.

 

Cuare

9,968

1991

RIS and map require up-date. 

 

Laguna de la Restinga

5,248

1996

RIS and map require up-date. 

 

Laguna de Tacarigua

9,200

1996

RIS requires up-date. 

 

Table 3 - Neotropics Ramsar site list and management plan status

Country

Site Name

Area (ha)

Total area per country (ha)

Management Plan (MP)?

Additional comments

Argentina

Bahía de Samborombón

243,965

No

MP currently not planned.

Laguna Blanca

11,250

Yes

No information available.

Laguna de Llancanelo

65,000

No

MP under preparation since 1995.

Laguna de los Pozuelos

16,224

Yes

MP has received implementation support from Small Grants Fund and Wetlands for the Future-funded projects.

Lagunas de Guanacache

580,000

No

MP under preparation.

Lagunas de Vilama

157,000

Yes

MP has received implementation support from Small Grants Fund project and Wetlands for the Future project in the context of High Andean wetland areas.

Reserva Costa Atlántica de Tierra del Fuego

28,600

Yes

MP under preparation.

Río Pilcomayo

55,000

No

No information available.

Jaaukanigás

492,000

No

No information available.

Lagunas y Esteros del Iberá

24,550

Yes

Part of integrated MP of Iberá macrosystem

Bañados del Río Dulce y Laguna de Mar Chiquita.

996,000

No

No information available.

2,669,589

Bahamas

Inagua National Park

32,600

No

MP currently not planned.

32,600

Belize

Crooked Tree Wildlife Sanctuary

6,637

Yes

No information available.

6,637

Bolivia

Cuenca de Tajzara

5,500

Yes

No information available.

Lago Titicaca (Sector Boliviano)

800,000

Yes

Existing joint plan with Peru. Additional MP in development.

Laguna Colorada

51,318

Yes

No information available.

Bañados de Izozog y el Río Parapetí

615,882

Yes

Partial MP from Humedales del Chaco National Park

Palmar de la Islas y las Salinas de San José

856,754

No

No information available.

Pantanal Boliviano

3,189,888

Yes

No information available.

Laguna Concepción

31,124

No

No information available.

Lagos Poopó y Uru Uru

967,607

No

No information available.

6,518,073

Brazil

Baixada Maranhense Environmental Protection Area

1,775,036

No

No information available.

Ilha do Bananal

562,312

Yes

MP for Araguaia (river) to be revised by end of 2002

Lagoa do Peixe

34,400

Yes

MP almost fully implemented

Mamirauá

1,124,000

Yes

No information available.

Pantanal Matogrossense

135,000

Yes

MP in final preparation phase

Parque Estadual Marinho do Parcel Manoel Luís including the Baixios do Mestre Álvaro & Tarol

34,556

No

No information available.

Reentrancias Maranhenses

2,680,911

No

No information available.

6,346,215

Chile

Carlos Anwandter Sanctuary

4,877

Yes

Existing MP awaiting final approval by CONAF

Humedal el Yali

520

No

MP under preparation

Laguna del Negro Francisco y Laguna Santa Rosa

62,460

Yes

MP part of Wildlife Protected Area

Salar de Surire

15,858

Yes

MP part of Wildlife Protected Area

Salar de Tara

5,443

Yes

MP part of Wildlife Protected Area

Salar del Huasco

6,000

No

No information available.

Sistema hidrológico de Soncor

5,016

Yes

MP part of Wildlife Protected Area

100,174

Colombia

Laguna de la Cocha

39,000

Yes

MP finalized in 2002.

Sistema Delta Estuarino del Río Magdalena, Ciénaga Grande de Santa Marta

400,000

Yes

MP finalized in 2002, partly funded by Small Grants Fund project.

439,000

Costa Rica

Caño Negro

9,969

Yes

No information available.

Cuenca Embalse Arenal

67,296

Yes

MP fully applied; implementation support given through Wetlands for the Future-funded projects.

Gandoca-Manzanillo

9,445

Yes

MP fully applied

Humedal Caribe Noreste

75,310

Yes

Several management programs in place. MP fully applied

Isla del Coco

99,623

Yes

MP currently being updated

Laguna Respringue

75

No

No MP – site within Santa Rosa National Park

Manglar de Potrero Grande

139

No

No MP – site within Santa Rosa National Park

Palo Verde

24,519

Yes

MP currently being updated. Implementation support given through Wetlands for the Future-funded project.

Tamarindo

500

No

MP under preparation.

Terraba-Sierpe

30,654

Yes

MP fully applied

317,530

Cuba

Ciénaga de Zapata

452,000

Yes

MP currently being revised.

452,000

Dominican Republic

Lago Enriquillo

20,000

No

No information available.

20,000

Ecuador

Abras de Mantequilla

22,500

No

MP under preparation, with support from WWF.

Isla Santay

4,705

No

MP under preparation.

La Segua

1,836

Yes

No information available.

Machalilla

14,430

Yes

No information available.

Manglares Churute

35,042

Yes

No information available.

Reserva Biológica Limoncocha

4,613

No

MP under preparation.

Laguna de Cube

113

Yes

MP prepared with aid of WWF Living Waters Program.

Refugio de Vida Silvestre Isla Santa Clara

46

No

No financial resources to undertake preparation.

83,285

El Salvador

Area Natural Protegida Laguna del Jocotal

1,571

Yes

MP fully applied

1,571

Guatemala

Manchón-Guamuchal

13,500

No

Private reserve.

Parque Nacional Laguna del Tigre

335,080

Yes

MP fully applied

Punta de Manabique

132,900

Yes

MP fully applied

Refugio de Vida Silvestre Bocas del Polochic

21,227

Yes

MP fully applied, has received implementation support from Small Grants Fund project.

502,707

Honduras

Barras de Cuero y Salado

13,225

Yes

Preliminary MP from 1993. MP currently being finalized.

Parque Nacional Jeanette Kawas

78,150

Yes

MP has received implementation support from Small Grants Fund project.

Refugio de Vida Silvestre Punta Izopo

11,200

Yes

No information available.

Sistema de Humedales de la Zona Sur de Honduras

67,711

No

MP under preparation

170,286

Jamaica

Black River Lower Morass

5,700

No

Draft MP to be finished by March 2004. Preparation support received through project funded by Small Grants Fund.

5,700

Nicaragua

Los Guatuzos

43,750

Yes

Bureau recommends revision of MP

Lago de Apanás - Asturias

5,415

No

No information available.

Sistema de Humedales de la Bahía de Bluefields

86,501

No

MP under preparation

Cayos Miskitos y Franja Costera Inmediata

85,000

Yes

MP under revision

Deltas del Estero Real y Llanos de Apacunca

81,700

No

No information available.

Refugio de Vida Silvestre Río San Juan

43,000

Yes

No information available.

Sistemas Lacustres, Palustres y Riberinos del municipio de San Miguelito

43,475

No

MP under preparation

Sistema Lagunar de Tisma

16,850

No

MP under preparation for part of site that is Nature Reserve

405,691

Panama

Golfo de Montijo

80,765

No

MP under preparation; site has annual operation plan. Preparation support received through project funded by Small Grants Fund.

Punta Patiño

13,805

Yes

No information available.

San San-Pond Sak

16,414

No

MP under preparation; site has annual operation plan

110,984

Paraguay

Estero Milagro

25,000

No

No information available.

Lago Ypoá

100,000

No

No information available.

Río Negro

370,000

No

No information available.

Tinfunque

280,000

No

No information available.

775,000

Peru

Lago Titicaca (Peruvian sector)

460,000

Yes

Existing joint plan with Peru. Master plan for Titicaca National Reserve currently being revised

Lagunas de Mejías

691

Yes

MP received implementation support from project funded by Small Grants Fund

Pacaya Samiria

2,080,000

Yes

No information available.

Paracas

335,000

Yes

Master Plan for Paracas Nature reserve currently being revised

Reserva Nacional de Junín

53,000

Yes

MP fully applied

Santuario Nacional Los Manglares de Tumbes

2,972

Yes

MP fully applied

Zona Reservada Los Pantanos de Villa

396

Yes

MP fully applied

Complejo de Humedales del Abanico del río Pastaza

3,827,329

No

No information available.

6,759,388

Saint Lucia

Mankoté Mangrove

60

No

No information available.

Savannes Bay

25

No

No information available.

85

Suriname

Coppenamemonding

12,000

Yes

Site is part of North Saramacca Area which has MP

12,000

Trinidad & Tobago

Nariva Swamp

6,234

Yes

MP received preparation support through project funded by Small Grants Fund.

6,234

Uruguay

Bañados del Este y Franja Costera

407,408

Yes

No information available.

407,408

Venezuela

Archipiélago Los Roques

213,220

Yes

Site has Zoning Plan and Regulations for Use

Ciénaga de Los Olivitos

26,000

Yes

Site has Zoning Plan and Regulations for Use

Cuare

9,968

Yes

Site has Zoning Plan and Regulations for Use

Laguna de la Restinga

5,248

Yes

Site has Zoning Plan and Regulations for Use

Laguna de Tacarigua

9,200

Yes

Site has Zoning Plan and Regulations for Use

263,636

TOTAL

100

   

26,401,074

60

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