The 9th Meeting of the Conference of the Contracting Parties

09/09/2005


"Wetlands and water: supporting life, sustaining livelihoods"
9th Meeting of the Conference of the Contracting Parties
to the Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971)
Kampala, Uganda, 8-15 November 2005
 

Ramsar COP9 DOC. 12
[English and Spanish only]

Regional overview of the implementation of the Convention and its Strategic Plan 2003 - 2008: Neotropics

National Reports upon which this overview is based can be consulted on the Ramsar Web site, http://ramsar.org/cop9/cop9_natlrpts_index.htm.

Contracting Parties in the Neotropics as of July 31, 2005: Antigua & Barbuda, Argentina, Bahamas, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Jamaica, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Dominican Republic, Saint Lucia, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, Uruguay and Venezuela (25).

Contracting Parties whose full National Reports are included in this analysis: Argentina, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Honduras, Jamaica, Nicaragua, Peru, Dominican Republic, Suriname and Trinidad and Tobago(15).

Contracting Parties whose short version of the National Report are included in this analysis: Bahamas, El Salvador, Santa Lucia and Venezuela (4)

Contracting Parties that have not yet submitted their National Reports: Cuba, Guatemala, Panama, Paraguay and Uruguay (5).

Antigua and Barbuda is a recent accession to the Convention and is therefore not expected to present a COP9 National Report.

1. Main achievements since COP8 and priorities for 2006-2008

1.1 Main achievements since COP8

1. There are 32 countries in the Neotropics; 25 are already Contracting Parties. One country has acceded to the Convention since COP8.

2. As of July 31, 2005, the region has 126 Ramsar sites that cover an area of more than 28.6 million hectares. This represents 22.8% of the world's Wetlands of International Importance. Since COP8, 27 new sites covering a surface of 6 million hectares have been designated in the Neotropics. No designated Ramsar site has been extended since COP8. The new designations represent an increase of roughly 8% of total Ramsar sites in the Neotropics since COP8.

3. In COP8 Resolution VIII.10, Contracting Parties in the Neotropics committed themselves to designate 44 new sites (the total designated as of July 2005 by all the Parties that had made these commitments is 24 sites, while other 3 sites were designated by Parties without commitments). It must be noted, however, that Cuba, Ecuador and Paraguay designated a much larger number of sites than what they had committed to in COP8, and several countries that committed to designate new sites have already submitted part of the necessary information to the Secretariat, so it is possible that many of those sites will be designated before COP9.

4. There are currently three subregional strategies for wetlands in the Neotropics: one for Central America, a conservation strategy for High Andean wetlands, and a strategic project for South America.

5. Colombia, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Peru, and Trinidad & Tobago have National Wetland Policies. Argentina, Brazil, and Jamaica apply national policies that partially fulfill this task. Argentina and Jamaica are currently developing specific instruments for wetlands. Belize, Bolivia, Chile, Ecuador and Suriname are developing National Wetland Policies.

6. According to the national reports presented on this occasion, there are 10 National Ramsar Committees or similar bodies in the region, while five countries are preparing to establish them. Belize used to have a National Wetland Committee but this is currently inactive. Thirteen countries in the region reported to COP8 that they had such committees.

7. The Neotropical Region currently has four sites in the Montreux Record, in Argentina, Costa Rica, Guatemala, and Uruguay; the same number as at the time of COP7 and COP8, but no sites have been removed from the Record since COP8.

8. Contracting Parties in the region have engaged in international cooperation efforts with international organizations such as the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD), The Nature Conservancy (TNC), Ducks Unlimited, and Conservation International (CI), as well as with regional initiatives such as the Wider Caribbean Action Plan.

9. The United States has provided USD 905,000 to support the Wetlands for the Future Initiative (WFF) since 2002. So far WFF has provided USD 2,725,000 in funding. During the last triennium USD 531,516 were used to support 56 projects in the Neotropical Region, as well as USD 63,438 in funding for 5 projects in Mexico.

10. The Small Grants Fund has financed seven projects between 2002 and 2004 in the Neotropics: Chile, Cuba and Uruguay in 2002; Bahamas and Guatemala in 2003; Jamaica and Nicaragua in 2004.

11. The governments of Canada, the United States of America and Mexico and the World Bank granted funds for the organization of the III Pan-American Regional Meeting celebrated in Merida, Mexico, in November 2004.

1.2 Priorities for 2006-2008

12. Based on analysis of the National Reports from the 12 Contracting Parties that filled the National Planning Tools component of the Report (Argentina, Belize, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Honduras, Jamaica, Nicaragua, Peru, Suriname and Trinidad & Tobago), the following priorities for 2006-2008 can be identified, in descending order of priority (numbers in […] are the Strategic Plan 2003-2008 Operation Objectives):

1. Maintaining the ecological character of all the Ramsar sites. [11.1]
2. Increasing the acknowledgement of the importance of wetlands in respect to water supply, coastal protection, flood defense, food security, poverty reduction, cultural heritage and scientific research. [3.3]
3. Encouraging active and informed participation of local communities and indigenous people. [6.1]
4. Monitoring the status of the ecologic characteristics of Ramsar sites. [11.2]
5. Determining the education and training needs of the institutions and people interested in conservation and wise use of wetlands. [20.1]
6. Promoting continuous national programs, projects and campaigns to increase community awareness about the important services provided by the wetlands. [R9.VI]
7. Looking after the inclusion of environmental evaluations as part of all development projects that affect wetlands. [15.2]

13. However, different sets of priorities were established for the Central American, Caribbean and South American subregions in the Declaration of Merida developed at the 3rd Regional Ramsar Meeting:

The Caribbean and Central America

1. Research, monitoring and evaluation (establishing biological criteria and indicators).
2. Local community participation in planning and management.
3. Inventories and evaluations (especially in wetlands and the monitoring of natural disasters and restoration).
4. Coordination among conventions (greater synergy with wetlands and Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) and Integrated Coastal Zone Management (ICZM).
5. Regional communication networks.

South America:

1. Complete and adopt the South American wetlands strategy.
2. Regional strategy for the conservation and sustainable use of High Andean wetlands.
3. Design of management plans and exchange of successful proposals.
4. Establishing and strengthening the National Ramsar Committees.
5. Develop and implement national wetland policies.
6. Promote the control and eradication of exotic alien species.

2. Activities undertaken since COP8 to implement the Convention

14. This analysis is presented for each of the 21 Operational Objectives of the Ramsar Strategic Plan 2003-2008. Numbers in square brackets [...] in each section heading refer to the numbering of the relevant Operational Objective in the Strategic Plan.

2.1 Inventory and assessment

2.1.A Wetland inventory [1.1]

15. Costa Rica, Chile, Ecuador, El Salvador and Trinidad & Tobago have prepared comprehensive wetland inventories of national coverage. Another nine Contracting Parties in the region (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Nicaragua, Jamaica, Peru, Saint Lucia and Venezuela) have partial inventories or initiatives in progress. Thus, 58% (14 out of 19) of the Parties in the Neotropics who submitted a National Report reported that they have made efforts since COP8 in order to fulfill this task. Based on such inventories, 5 of 19 Parties in the Neotropics (26%) have identified 38 wetlands as potential Ramsar sites to be designated in the future: Chile (14), Colombia (2), Ecuador (11), Jamaica (7), and Trinidad and Tobago (4). Three other Parties (Argentina, the Dominican Republic and Suriname) have partial inventories but have not identified further potential Ramsar sites.

16. Regarding national databases on wetlands, only Nicaragua reported that they have a complete and functional database, while 8 other countries (Belize, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Honduras, Jamaica and Peru) reported they have partial databases or they have made efforts in that respect (47% of the region).

17. Ten Parties in the Neotropics assigned high priority (Colombia, Costa Rica, Honduras, Jamaica, and Trinidad and Tobago) and medium priority (Argentina, Belize, Chile, Nicaragua y Suriname) to this Objective as a planning instrument. Even though resources available for this purpose were limited (67%) or severely limited (25%) in these countries, a high level of priority was not related to the severely limited resources available. It is important to highlight that preparing national wetland inventories can be an extremely expensive activity, since it requires field visits and satellite images, as Jamaica and Trinidad & Tobago have planned to undertake. On the other hand, Peru has planned to finalize the preliminary list of wetlands and pilot watersheds in 2005.

2.1.B Wetlands assessment [1.2]

18. Among the Contracting Parties in the region, only Costa Rica and Trinidad and Tobago have conducted regular internal reviews to identify factors potentially altering the ecological character of Ramsar sites. The Contracting Parties that have partially carried out such analysis include Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Chile, and Peru. These countries represent 47% of the region: seven out of the 15 Contracting Parties in the Neotropics that submitted a full National Report.

19. In this case, only 4 countries, all of them from Central America and the Caribbean (Costa Rica, Honduras, Jamaica, and Trinidad and Tobago), assigned high priority to this Objective, while another 7 assigned medium priority. Even though the two countries that fully met this objective assigned high priority, in general it is not possible to see a clear correlation between the level of priority assigned and the available resources to implement the objective. The cost for the assessment varies based on factors such as the method used, duration, and the level of detail desired.

20. Parties also reported in their National Reports that there are changes in the ecological character which took place, are happening or may happen in future in the following wetlands: Argentina - Cuenca del Plata; Brazil - Rio Grande do Norte, Rio Grande do Sul, Parque Nacional de la Restinga de Jurubatiba, Pantanal and Cuenca del Alto Paraguay, Delta del Jacuí, Ilha dos Marinheiros, Cuenca y Estuario de Santos y Sao Vicente, Sistema Cananéia Iguape and Arrecifes Costeros Chile - reported conducting a "vulnerability study" (not a change in ecological character) at Santuario de la Naturaleza Carlos Anwandter Ramsar site; Costa Rica - Laguna Pochotal, Quebrada Zapote, Refugio Nacional de Vida Silvestre Playa Hermosa - Punta Mala; and Peru - Santuario Nacional Lagunas de Mejía and Humedal de Villa María.

2.2 Policies and legislation, including impact assessment and valuation

2.2.A Policy instruments for wetland wise use [2.1]

21. 33% of the Parties in the Neotropics, 5 (Colombia, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Peru, and Trinidad and Tobago) of the 15 that submitted a full report, have National Wetland Policies (NWPs) in place, while Argentina, Brazil and Jamaica have policy instruments that partially fulfill this task. Chile and Suriname have begun to develop National Wetland Policies.

22. Excluding Peru (low priority), all the countries that have National Wetland Policies reported they assigned high priority to this Objective. In Peru, it has not been possible to put the National Wetlands Conservation Strategy into practice because of a lack of legislation to support it. In spite of assigning high or medium priority in 83% of the cases, it is reported by the same group of countries that the corresponding resources are limited or severely limited in 91% of the cases. The costs associated with developing a National Wetlands Policy are mainly based on the length and duration of the consultation and discussion processes among the interested parties. However, lack of resources should not be used to justify not carrying out a consultation processes.

2.2.B Development, review and amendment of policies, legislation, institutions and practices [2.2]

23. 53% of Contracting Parties that presented a full report, 8 out of 15, have carried out reviews of their laws and institutions. Complete: Colombia and Costa Rica; partial: Argentina, Ecuador, Peru and Suriname; revision under process: Brazil and Jamaica; and updating: Chile.

24. A lower percentage of the countries in the region (47%, 7 out of 15) have completely (Chile and Colombia) or partially (Argentina, Costa Rica, Jamaica, Nicaragua and Suriname) completed an evaluation of those policies, programs and official plans that might have an impact on wetlands.

25. Eight countries (Belize, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Honduras, Jamaica and Trinidad & Tobago), have the legal requirement to carry out an Environmental Impact Assessment in all likely cases of change in ecological character of all wetlands, including Ramsar sites. In another seven parties (Argentina, Peru, Bolivia, Ecuador, Nicaragua, Dominican Republic and Suriname), an EIA only applies in certain cases.

26. 47% of the Contracting Parties in the region, 9 out of 19, have progressed in developing and/or applying methodologies for the economic, social and environmental assessment of the benefits and functions of their wetlands, either completely (Ecuador and Colombia) or with progress in some aspects (Argentina, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Peru, Saint Lucia, Suriname, and Trinidad and Tobago).

27. It is interesting to note that Chile and Colombia have shown leadership in the region in terms of assessing their law, policies and institutions; Colombia assigned high priority to this Objective, and Chile considered it non relevant. Even though the level of priority assigned by the countries that submitted their National Reports is similar to the priority for former Objectives, in this case three countries (Colombia, Honduras, and Trinidad and Tobago) have adequate resources to carry this task out, the highest number of all Objectives in the 12 countries that provided information.

2.3 Integration of wetland wise use into sustainable development

2.3.A Methodologies for wetland conservation and wise use [3.1]

28. 93% of the countries in the Neotropics, 14 out of 15, that submitted their full reports have made available the Ramsar guidelines on wetland wise use, and its application, to their authorities and institutions (Chile, Colombia, Honduras, Jamaica, Nicaragua, Peru, Suriname, and Trinidad and Tobago), or they have done this in some cases (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Costa Rica, Ecuador, and the Dominican Republic).

29. The priority assigned to this Objective by 12 countries ranges from high (42%) to medium (50%), to one country that assigned low priority. However, in terms of resources, in most of the cases carrying out this activity does not entail significant costs.

2.3.B Peatlands [3.2]

30. Only Argentina, Chile, Colombia and Costa Rica report having taken measures to apply the COP8 Ramsar guidelines for peatland ecosystems at the national level. However, a number of Parties have designated Ramsar sites containing peatlands as an under-represented wetland type, including Argentina (Reserva Provincial Laguna Brava, in 2003 and 2 sites before COP8); Bolivia (3 sites, all prior to COP8), Colombia (1 site prior to COP8); Costa Rica (Turberas de Talamanca, designated in 2003 and 1 site prior to COP8); Cuba (Ciénaga de Lanier y Sur de la Isla de la Juventud, and Humedal Delta del Cauto, during COP8, and one prior to COP8); Honduras Lago de Yojoa, in 2005) and Peru (3 sites of which Bofedales y Laguna de Salinas, and Laguna del Indio - Dique Los Españoles were designated in the last triennium). Other countries that have Ramsar sites that contain peatlands which were designated prior to COP8 include Jamaica, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay and Uruguay. The other countries have recognized the importance of the under-represented wetland types and will consider them for future designations once the inventorying efforts currently underway or in the planning stages are finalized. See additional reference to under-represented wetland types on Table 1, where the presence of under-represented wetland types in new site designations is detailed.

31. Given the non-homogeneous geographical distribution of "bofedales" and peatlands in the Neotropics, it is not surprising to see a variety of priorities assigned to them. Since this is not a common ecosystem to all countries, its range of priority is noticeably lower than for other shared Objectives, and only Peru has assigned a high importance and abundant economic resources to them. In the other cases, the countries that have shown the greatest progress (Argentina, Chile, Colombia and Costa Rica) have assigned middle importance to peatlands, while 3 other countries in the region have considered them non-relevant. In general, there is overlap among the countries that have deployed the greatest efforts in this area and those who are part of the High Andean Wetlands Strategy.

2.3.C Recognition of wetland values and functions [3.3]

32. Thirteen Contracting Parties in the Neotropics have taken systematic measures (Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Honduras, Jamaica and Peru) or sporadic measures (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Nicaragua, Suriname and Trinidad & Tobago) to protect wetlands of special importance in regards to poverty reduction, water supply, and food security, that fulfill essential environmental functions and services in their local context, or constitute a heritage for culture or research. In contrast, only Brazil and Trinidad & Tobago have taken systematic actions to assure that their institutions give the appropriate importance to groundwater management, although nine other countries have taken measures in some of cases. Finally, 10 countries in the region (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Jamaica, Nicaragua, Peru, and Trinidad & Tobago) have developed or are developing programs, projects or research in the topics mentioned above.

33. The socioeconomic characteristics of the countries in the Neotropics justify one of the highest assignations of priorities to this Objective (67% high, 17% medium). However, in most cases explicit goals and programmed activities corresponding to this Objective are more focused on communication, awareness and public education rather than poverty reduction, with the main exception of Costa Rica. So far, the recognition of the values and functions of wetlands has not been reflected in the allocation of more resources for their conservation and wise use.

2.3.D Integration of wetland policies into broader planning and management from local to national scales [3.4]

34. The consideration of the values and functions of wetlands has been incorporated into the planning process for large dams in six Parties in the region. Chile has given the greatest priority to this issue. It is of great importance to maintain continuous water resource supply to Ramsar sites and other wetlands in drought situations. Based on the National Reports from the region, only four of the Contracting Parties (Argentina, Costa Rica, Jamaica and Peru) have taken measures in this respect. Finally, of all the countries that submitted a report only Chile, Costa Rica and El Salvador reported having participated in the joint Ramsar/CBD River Basin Initiative.

35. Regarding the total number of countries at the regional level (although not by the same countries), this Objective got exactly the same level of priority and resources as Objective 1.1, which also includes promotion of the wise use principle at the national and state levels. It is clear that countries have adopted different approaches to implement this Objective; for example, while Colombia and Costa Rica have considered including wetland issues within their watershed and water resources legislation, Nicaragua has focused its efforts on promoting wetland issues in the framework of their land policies.

2.4 Restoration and rehabilitation [4.1]

36. Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Jamaica, Peru, and Trinidad and Tobago have applied partial measures to restore or rehabilitate some wetlands identified as priority, and Belize has begun negotiations in this respect. Ramsar sites in this category include Laguna Blanca (Argentina), Palo Verde and Caño Negro (Costa Rica), Nariva Swamp (Trinidad & Tobago), and the RPPN [Reserva Particular de Partimônio Natural] del SESC [Serviço Nacional do Comercio] Pantanal (Brazil). 53% (8 of 15) of the Parties that provided this information reported at least some wetland restoration activities.

37. Eight of the 15 Contracting Parties in the Region that submitted a full National Report (53%) have resource information, general reference documentation or case studies about wetland restoration, although only five Parties have gathered and publicized new information and methodologies in this respect.

38. In assessing education and training needs related to wetland restoration, Chile, Costa Rica and Peru have made partial evaluations, while Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago have plans to make assessments in the near future. The most outstanding aspect in the analysis of priorities and resources in the region is the lack of available funds for this purpose (33% limited, 58% severely limited). Since restoration and rehabilitation of wetlands is a highly expensive activity, this information reveals that 91% of the countries that submitted information in this respect do not have the necessary means to recover (at least partially) wetland ecosystems that could be destroyed within their territory. Based on this, promoting preventive approaches through EIAs (section 2.2 B) and incentives (section 2.8) becomes particularly relevant.

2.5 Invasive alien species [5.1]

39. 53%, 8 of the 15 Parties that submitted a full report (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Nicaragua, Peru), have developed and applied policies, strategies and/or management responses of some kind to deal with invasive alien species. Of these countries, five have also incorporated provisions about invasive alien species into their legislation and wetland policies. In the case of Trinidad & Tobago, some legal measures are in place even though these have not been put into practice. With the exception of Chile and Nicaragua, all these countries and Jamaica have also completed risk assessments of these species for their wetlands. In total, 10 of the Parties have developed and publicized guidelines and practices about preventing, controlling and eradicating these species.

40. The allocation of level of priority varied in this case from medium (42%, 5 out of 12 countries) to low (33%, 4 of 12 countries), while available resources were extremely limited in 75% of the cases (9 out of 12 countries). These results appear to reveal that invasive species in wetlands is a non-generalized or a non-well known phenomenon, and therefore it is a priority for only some countries. It is worthwhile mentioning that while regional consensus is based upon prevention and elimination of these species, Costa Rica has additionally proposed actively promoting their use among local and indigenous communities. As in the former section, an appropriate regulatory framework (section 2.2 B) represents a significant contribution to advance in this respect.

2.6 Local communities, indigenous people, and cultural values [6.1]

41. To some extent, 13 Contracting Parties (68% of the Parties that submitted their National Report) in the region (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Honduras, Jamaica, Nicaragua, Peru, Dominican Republic, and Trinidad and Tobago) promote management of wetlands by indigenous people and direct stakeholders.

42. 73%, 11 of the 15 countries in the region that presented a full report (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Nicaragua, Peru, Dominican Republic, Suriname, and Trinidad and Tobago), support or have given partial support to documenting and applying traditional knowledge and management practices in wetlands.

43. Together with Objective 3.3 (section 2.3 C), this objective shares the second highest level of priority (84% between high and medium), but a lower resource allocation (42% limited, 58% extremely limited). Bolivia was the only country in the region that assigned low priority to this objective.

2.7 Private sector involvement [7.1]

44. 80%, 12 of the 15 Parties in the region that submitted a full report (Argentina, Belize, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Honduras, Jamaica, Nicaragua, Peru, Suriname, and Trinidad and Tobago), have made efforts to encourage private sector involvement in applying wise use principles in activities and investment that affect wetlands. It is interesting to note that the two countries who have signed cooperation agreements with the private sector in this respect are also the only two countries that assigned high priority to this Objective (Honduras) or assigned adequate resources to this task (Chile).

45. Even though only Chile and Peru have partially analyzed the characteristics of the national and international market of products from wetlands, 11 countries in the region (Argentina, Belize, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Honduras, Jamaica, Peru, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago) have moved forward in the application of judicial, institutional and/or administrative measures to guarantee exploitation and trade of these products in a sustainable way.

2.8 Incentives [8.1]

46. For the Neotropics, only four countries (Argentina, Chile, Colombia and Jamaica) have carried out partial reviews of the existing incentives that have positive or negative consequences on the conservation and wise use of wetlands. It is important to highlight that these countries are not necessarily the same as those that reported having taken measures to promote incentives that foster -and eliminate those that discourage- the conservation and wise use of their wetlands (Argentina, Colombia, Costa Rica and Ecuador).

47. Only National Reports from six countries provided information regarding their goals and programmed activities (Colombia, Costa Rica, Honduras, Nicaragua, Peru, and Trinidad and Tobago), while 2 did so for goals only (Argentina and Jamaica). In spite of the scarce information, it is possible to highlight that Costa Rica is planning to modify its Forest Law in order to include wetland resources as part of the payment for environmental services; Jamaica has postponed the analysis of negative incentives until 2007; and Peru has the intention to cooperate with various NGOs to disseminate an Internet package, prepared by IUCN, that contains information on incentives. The resources available to carry out these activities are extremely limited in most cases.

2.9 Communication, education, and public awareness (CEPA) [9.1]

48. As of July 31, 2005, the following countries had identified their CEPA focal points:

  • CEPA government focal point: Argentina, Bahamas, Belize, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Jamaica, Nicaragua, Peru, Dominican Republic, Saint Lucia, Suriname, Trinidad & Tobago, and Venezuela.
  • CEPA non-government focal point: Argentina, Bahamas, Colombia, Ecuador, Jamaica, Nicaragua, Peru, Dominican Republic, Trinidad & Tobago, and Venezuela. Brazil is in the nomination process.

49. According to the National Reports received for COP9, only Colombia has carried out actions to identify regional CEPA needs, while in Jamaica such review is in progress. Both countries gave high priority to this Objective, though with limited resources.

50. Even though only 40%, 6 out of the 15 countries that submitted a full report (Argentina, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Suriname, and Trinidad and Tobago), reported having carried out actions in the identification of special CEPA wetland information sources, 67%, 10 out of 15 Parties in the region with full reports, have incorporated CEPA strategies and actions in the management plans of their Ramsar sites. In Peru for example, the Master Plans of all Ramsar sites must be translated into "Environmental Education Plans" with defined goals and actions for the short, medium and long terms. In spite of having limited resources in practice, a first step planned has been promoting active participation of the Boquerón annex (community) in the management of Santuario Nacional Lagunas de Mejía.

51. 40%, 6 out of the 15 Parties that submitted a full report (Argentina, Belize, Brazil, Ecuador, Peru and Trinidad & Tobago), have established educational centers in wetland sites, and at least 11 Ramsar sites in these countries have the support at least of one educational center for wetlands. Belize, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Jamaica, and Trinidad and Tobago have plans to establish more centers of this type in several of their current and future Ramsar sites, while Peru plans to improve the quality of the existing ones. Likewise, the same number of Contracting Parties in the region (Belize, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Nicaragua and Peru) have taken measures to furnish Ramsar sites with the necessary equipment in order to turn them into wise-use-principle demonstration sites, while Suriname and Trinidad and Tobago have plans to do this in the future.

52. Bahamas, Colombia, El Salvador, Peru and Suriname (26%, 5 of 19 of the countries in the Neotropics that submitted a National Report) have established task forces to undertake a review of national needs, capacities and opportunities in the field of wetland CEPA. In Venezuela, the CEPA task force operated until 2003, producing the diagnosis of the condition of Ramsar sites to prepare a strategy in accordance to the reality of the sites, and evaluated the funding proposals in the areas of communication and education, five of which were financed through the Wetlands for the Future Fund.

53. Only seven countries (47% of the Parties that submitted their full COP9 National Report) reported having modified the official curricula to include topics relating to wetlands. In all cases, these modifications have been partial.

54. 60%, 9 of 15 of the Contracting Parties in the Neotropics which submitted a full National Report, have taken steps to provide Internet access to Ramsar site managers. Nine countries in the region (Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Peru and Dominican Republic, Suriname and Trinidad & Tobago) have implemented or are in the process of implementing CEPA e-mail networks for wetlands. The most advanced countries are Argentina (SAyDS), Peru (INRENA), and Brazil (Aguapé Network) which maintain these fora and other virtual platforms to exchange information on the subject. The fact that these countries have been able to implement the mechanisms mentioned above, in spite of their financial limitations, demonstrates that economic resources are not always a limiting factor to obtain results.

55. Within the CEPA Programme the Parties assigned the greatest priority to the specific Operational Objective R9.VI in the National Report (promoting campaigns, programs and projects to increase community awareness regarding the services and values provided by wetlands): high in 58% of the cases, or in 7 out of 12 countries.

2.10 Designation of Ramsar sites - This analysis is made based on the Wetlands International database.

2.10.A Application of the Strategic Framework [10.1]

56. 97 Ramsar sites have been designated as representative, rare or unique (Ramsar Criterion 1) in the Neotropics, twenty of which have been designated since 1 September 2002: Argentina (2), Brazil (1), Chile (2), Colombia (1), Costa Rica (1), Cuba (5), Ecuador (2), Honduras (1), Jamaica (1), Panama (1), Peru(2) and Uruguay (1). This means 48%, 12 out of the 25 Parties in the region, have designated sites with those characteristics in the last three years. Belize plans to designate a site with these characteristics in the future.

57. Eighty-nine Ramsar sites that host globally or nationally threatened, unique or endemic species (Ramsar Criterion 2) have been designated in the Neotropics. Twenty-two of these sites have been designated in the last triennium: Argentina (3), Brazil (1), Chile (2), Costa Rica (1), Cuba (4), Ecuador (2), Honduras (2), Jamaica (1), Panama (1), Paraguay (2), Peru (2), and Uruguay (1). Thus 12 (48%) of the 25 Parties in the region have designated sites under Criterion 2 during the triennium.

58. Because almost none of the countries have a complete inventory of their wetlands, or a national strategy for the designation of priority sites, it is hard to determine which types of wetlands are under-represented in the Neotropics.

59. There is a high number of marine/coastal Ramsar sites (67 of the 126) in the Neotropical region. Costa Rica has designated 8, followed by Cuba and Ecuador with 6, Honduras and Venezuela with 5, Brazil, Chile, Nicaragua, Panama, and Peru with 4, Argentina and Guatemala with 3, Colombia, Jamaica and Saint Lucia with 2, Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Suriname, Trinidad & Tobago, and Uruguay with 1 respectively. In the last three years, nine countries designated 15 of these 67 sites.

60. At least 59 sites in the region host populations of migratory aquatic birds and 10 of these sites regularly support 1% of the individuals in a population of one species or subspecies of water bird (Ramsar criterion 6). Four of these sites were designated during the last triennium: Humedal Rio Máximo Cagüey (Cuba); Bahía de Panamá (Panama); Laguna Chaco Lodge (Paraguay); and Bahía Lomas (Chile). It is worthwhile mentioning there are 22 sites that meet Criterion 6 in the region, eight of which were designated in the last triennium. Sixty six sites in the region host populations of sea turtles that have different degrees of vulnerability: Antigua and Barbuda (1); Bahamas (1); Brazil (1); Cuba (2); Ecuador (2); Guatemala (1); Honduras (2); Jamaica (1); Nicaragua (2); Peru (1); and Venezuela (4). At least 66 sites in the region host sea turtles and/or migratory birds and in total more than 52% of the Ramsar sites in the region are of great importance to various migratory species.

61. Of the 26 shared water wetlands designated in the Neotropics, only one, Reserva Ecológica Cayapas-Mataje (Ecuador), was designated in the last triennium. Belize plans to designate the transboundary wetland "Sarstoon Temash National Park" shortly.

62. 52%, 13 of the 25 countries party to the Convention (Antigua & Barbuda, Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, Saint Lucia and Uruguay), have designated 13 wetlands as Ramsar sites that so far do not have any other type of national protection, nor any type of international designation besides Ramsar. Of these, 7 sites were designated during the last triennium: Codrington Lagoon (Antigua & Barbuda), Humedales Chaco (Argentina), Bahía Lomas (Chile), Delta del Río Baudó (Colombia), Laguna de Bacalar (Honduras), Bahía de Panamá (Panama) and Esteros de Farrapos e Islas del Rio Uruguay (Uruguay).

63. During the last triennium 48%, 12 of the 25 countries of the region (Antigua and Barbuda (1), Argentina (3), Colombia (1), Costa Rica (1), Cuba (5), Ecuador (2), Honduras (2), Jamaica (1), Panama (1), Paraguay (1), Peru (2), and Uruguay (1)), have given special attention to the designation of 21 Ramsar sites with under-represented wetland types, many of which are the dominant type in the wetland: coral reefs, temporary pools, mangrove swamps, wet grasslands, karst systems and peatlands. Jamaica fulfilled its commitment to designate one additional site with under-represented wetland types (Palisadoes-Port Royal) in the last triennium. Recognition of under-represented wetland types has improved steadily in the Neotropics region. See Table 1 in the Annex for details on the new Ramsar sites.

64. At least 40% of the Parties in the region, six of the 15 that submitted a full report (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Peru, and Trinidad and Tobago), systematically collect data about bird populations, while Bolivia, Costa Rica, Jamaica, Nicaragua and Suriname have carried out partial efforts in this respect. Among these countries, only Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Jamaica and Nicaragua report having provided data of their bird populations to Wetlands International.

65. The Contracting Parties assigned high priority (50%, six countries) and medium priority, in the same number of cases, to this Objective. Out of all the information received from the National Report, the highest amount of resources was allocated to this objective: good (Peru); appropriate (Trinidad & Tobago); limited (Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Honduras, Jamaica and Suriname); and extremely limited (Belize, Costa Rica and Nicaragua). It is clear that the List of Wetlands of International Importance still has great relevance for the Parties in the Region. Designation of new Ramsar sites and the application of the Strategic Framework and the Convention guidelines, more than the expansion of existing sites (Costa Rica's commitment before COP8), reveals the possible direction in which the List will evolve in the future.

2.10.B Maintenance and use of the Ramsar Sites Database [10.2]

66. The RIS files from 62 of 126 Ramsar sites in the Neotropics (49%) need to be updated according to the criteria established in Resolution VI.13 and reiterated in Resolutions VII.2 and VIII.3. The regional team has requested updates on several occasions for either RIS files older than six years, incomplete RIS files, and/or sites with deficient maps. The Parties of the region whose files are fully updated as of 31 July 2005 are Belize, Cuba, Nicaragua, Dominican Republic, Saint Lucia and Uruguay. Table 2 in the Annex provides further details.

67. Updated RISs are pending from: Antigua & Barbuda (1), Argentina (6), Bahamas (1), Bolivia (2), Brazil (5), Chile (7), Colombia (1), Costa Rica (8), Ecuador (3), El Salvador (1), Guatemala (2), Honduras (4), Jamaica (1), Panama (3), Paraguay (4), Peru (6), Suriname (1), Trinidad & Tobago (1), and Venezuela (5). Further information is provided in Table 2 of the Annex.

68. The countries that provided information in this respect have assigned to the updating of Ramsar Information Sheets a high priority and limited resources (Colombia, high priority and extremely limited resources), (Costa Rica, a medium priority and adequate resources), and (Trinidad & Tobago); a medium priority and limited resources (Bolivia, Chile and Jamaica); or a low priority and extremely limited resources (Peru). Honduras committed itself in Objective 11.1 of its National Report to update the RISs for its 4 sites. Suriname mentioned other programme goals and activities for this Objective.

2.11 Management planning and monitoring of Ramsar sites

2.11.A Maintenance of the ecological character of all Ramsar sites [11.1]

69. 80%, 12 of the 15 Parties in the Neotropics that submitted full reports, reported that they have documented and applied measures to maintain the ecological character of Ramsar sites (Colombia and Trinidad and Tobago) or have made partial efforts in this regard (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Jamaica, Nicaragua, Peru and Dominican Republic). In Belize, these activities are taking place simultaneously with the update of the management plan of the only Ramsar site in the country.

70. 28%, 7 of the 25 Parties in the region (Bahamas, Belize, El Salvador, Suriname, Trinidad & Tobago, Uruguay and Venezuela), have management plans or strategies in place for all their Ramsar sites, but with the exception of Uruguay and Venezuela each of these countries have only one Ramsar site in their territories. As of 31 July 2005, 75 of the 126 Ramsar sites in the Neotropics have management plans or strategies in place, and plans for another 18 sites are currently being prepared. See Table 3 in Annex for details on management plan status for all Ramsar sites in the region. (The analysis in this paragraph was made considering the Wetlands International database and the Bureau's information) On the other hand, of the countries in the region that submitted a full National Report and have management plans in place for one or more of their Ramsar sites, 73%, 11 out of 15, report having incorporated measures to maintain their ecological character, either wholly (Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Trinidad and Tobago) or in part (Argentina, Chile, Jamaica and Peru). (Note: the analyses in this paragraph have been made from information available in the Ramsar Sites Database or available to the Secretariat).

71. 43%, seven of the 15 countries in the Neotropics that submitted a National Report (Argentina, Belize, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador and Peru), reported having management committees for wetland sites. In addition, Brazil and Jamaica have begun to take steps in this respect, and Suriname began the corresponding planning process.

72. At least 60%, nine of the 15 countries (Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Jamaica, Nicaragua, Peru, and Trinidad are Tobago), totally or partially apply zoning measures to regulate activities in those wetlands where it is warranted. Twenty-six Ramsar sites reported having zoning measures in place.

73. 47%, 7 of the 15 countries (Argentina (3), Belize (1), Chile (1), Costa Rica (11), Ecuador (7), Peru (2) and Trinidad & Tobago (1)), use strict protection measures to regulate activities in those wetlands where it is warranted. This makes a total of 26 Ramsar sites covered by strict protection measures. Suriname is planning to apply this level of protection to its only Ramsar site.

74. Maintaining the ecological character of all Ramsar sites was the Objective that received the highest priority among all countries that submitted their National Reports, obtaining a high priority in 75% of cases (9 countries) and medium in 17% (2 countries). However, the accomplishment of a potentially expensive activity such as this one can be questioned when resources are limited in 42% of the cases (5 countries) and extremely limited in 58% (7 countries). Since fulfilling this Objective is closely related to the application of appropriate management plans for each Ramsar site, its accomplishment is indirectly based on various activities such as maintenance of species inventories, involvement of the local population, and control and surveillance in the site, among others.

2.11.B Monitoring the condition of Ramsar sites (including application of Article 3.2 and the Montreux Record) [11.2]

75. The Neotropics region currently has four Ramsar sites on the Montreux Record:

  • Bañados del Este y Franja Costera, Uruguay. Designation: 22/05/84. Montreux Record: 04/07/90. Ramsar Advisory Missions: October 1988 and May 1993.
  • Laguna del Tigre, Guatemala. Designation: 26/06/90. Montreux Record: 16/06/93. Ramsar Advisory Mission: July 1997.
  • Palo Verde, Costa Rica. Designation: 27/12/91. Montreux Record: 16/06/93. Ramsar Advisory Mission: March 1998.
  • Laguna de Llancanelo, Argentina. Designation: 08/11/95. Montreux Record: 02/07/01. Ramsar Advisory Mission: October 2001.

76. Argentina and Costa Rica reported that they have partly implemented the Ramsar Advisory Mission recommendations and taken other actions, and have recognized the need of further actions for the eventual removal of their respective sites from the Montreux Record.

77. It is encouraging that at least 13 countries in the region have implemented monitoring programs in their Ramsar sites, to the extent of their possibilities, and that seven of these have mechanisms to collect information about the changes in the ecological character of their sites. This will contribute to avoiding further deterioration in the future.

78. As in the former cases, there are limited (33%, four countries) or severely limited resources (67%, eight countries), in spite of the predominantly high priority (58%, seven countries) or medium priority (25%, three countries) given to this Objective. In order to increase the effectiveness of available resources, the frequency of monitoring can be adapted in terms of the ecological importance of certain areas within the wetland, as Jamaica recommends in its National Report, and paying special attention to the EIA for all projects proposed within or near the relevant site, as Nicaragua suggests.

79. Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, Jamaica, Nicaragua, Peru, Suriname, and Trinidad and Tobago informed that they have detected or are studying possible changes s in the ecological character in some of their Ramsar sites and other wetlands in each country.

2.12 Management of shared water resources, wetlands and wetland species

2.12.A Inventory and integrated management of shared wetlands and hydrological basins [12.1]

80. Six Contracting Parties (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica and Peru) reported that they undertake a joint management of their shared wetlands. Colombia has included this topic in its meetings with Venezuela, in spite of not having any transboundary sites yet. Bolivia and Peru cooperatively manage their Ramsar sites in Lago Titicaca. Costa Rica and Nicaragua cooperate in the management of Cuenca del Rio San Juan, in which there are Ramsar sites from both countries. Laguna Merin in Uruguay (located within the Bañados del Este y Franja Costera Ramsar site) has a bi-national commission with Brazil that invests in the development of the area. Because 12 Parties cover shared Ramsar sites in the region, further efforts should be made by these countries to work together.

81. Only three countries - Brazil, Honduras and Peru - reported having carried out joint impact assessments with the neighboring countries for their shared sites. Honduras was the only country that assigned high priority to this Objective.

2.12.B Cooperative monitoring and management of shared wetland-dependent species [12.2]

82. Argentina, Chile, Colombia and Peru reported the development of new regional networks of sites and initiatives in favor of migratory wetland dependent species. (See section 2.10)

83. Interpreting that only transboundary wetlands are only physically shared wetlands underestimates the importance of international cooperation in joint management of the populations of migratory species that are common for many Ramsar sites (especially water birds, see section 2.10 A). Assigning low priority to joint management of sites with shared species reduces the number of available tools to influence the factors that decrease the population of said species.

2.12.C Support and promotion of regional arrangements under the Convention [12.3]

84. There are 12 parties that have participated in the development of a regional initiative under the Ramsar Strategic Plan, and they are mostly related to the Regional Strategy for conservation and sustainable use of High Andean wetlands. Through the Central American Environment and Development Commission (CCAD), Central American countries have also been working on the implementation of their regional wetland policy. In addition, Belize, Mexico and Guatemala will soon sign an agreement for cooperation in matters related to protected areas, taking the Convention's guidelines into consideration.

85. The goals and priorities mentioned in the National Reports of 12 Parties assign medium (58%) to low (17%) priority to this Objective, and limited (42%) to severely limited resources (33%). In general, the Contracting Parties in the Caribbean (Bahamas, Jamaica, Dominican Republic, Saint Lucia, and Trinidad and Tobago) have deployed less activity than their counterparts in Central America and South America to prepare a subregional strategy. Besides the obvious geographical and ecological differences that result in different priorities from the inland Neotropics, their lesser capacity for resource mobilization, the absence of a common language, and the fact that several countries in the Caribbean are not yet Contracting Parties to the Convention, partially explain this trend. Trinidad and Tobago has led an effort to promote the Caribbean as a subregion with particular characteristics within the Neotropics.

2.13 Collaboration with other Multilateral Environmental Agreements and institutions [13.1]

86. Eighteen of the 19 Parties that submitted their National Reports to the Ramsar Secretariat reported that they have, or will soon have, some national mechanism for cooperation between their Ramsar Administrative Authorities and other multilateral agreements related to the environment, such as the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD), the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), and the Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), among others. An example of this is the project started by El Salvador in May 2005, the purpose of which is completing a national assessment of the synergies among the Ramsar Convention, UNCCD, CDB and UNFCCC, to conclude with a National Action Plan of Synergies with concrete results for the three-year period 2005-2008. In other countries in the region, this cooperation has been easier as the same regional body (CCAD), government office, committee or person coordinates the activities of these agreements.

87. Six countries (Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Honduras and the Dominican Republic) reported having some type of cooperation mechanism between their Ramsar Administrative Authorities and the National Committees and liaisons of the UNESCO Man and the Biosphere Programme. Only Chile, Colombia, Jamaica and Suriname have used the UNEP guidelines in relation to Ramsar.

88. In general, the importance of this Objective has been widely recognized by the Parties, and it has obtained a high priority in 42% of the cases (5 countries) and medium in 58% (7 countries). Seeking for synergies among the various MEAs, trying to avoid duplication of efforts, entails a common undertaking, whose results must come from all the parties involved.

2.14 Sharing of expertise and information [14.1]

89. Four countries in the Neotropics, out of the 15 that submitted a full National Report, have made efforts to share information at the national, regional and/or international levels (Chile, Colombia, Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago), and other 7 have done it only in some cases (Argentina, Belize, Brazil, Ecuador, Nicaragua, Peru, Suriname). Argentina, Colombia and Suriname have already begun efforts towards the development of packages for the common use of knowledge and information through the Internet.

90. 21%, four of the 19 countries in the Neotropics which submitted a National Report (Argentina, Bolivia, Peru and Suriname), have Ramsar sites twinned with sites in other Contracting Parties. Since 1989, Suriname has maintained twinning of the Bigi Pan Multiple Use Management Area with the sites in Minas Basin (Nova Scotia) and Shepody Bay (Brunswick Province) in Canada, as part of the Western Hemisphere Shorebird Reserve Network. A framework agreement has also been established recently for the conservation and wise use of the High Andean wetlands between Argentina, Bolivia, Chile and Peru, through which knowledge is shared, joint projects are carried out, and assistance is provided for training in four Ramsar sites. During the last three-year period, Peru formalized twinning between two of its wetlands: Reserva Nacional de Junín and Reserva Nacional de Salinas y Aguada Blanca (which includes several Ramsar sites).

2.15 Financing the conservation and wise use of wetlands

2.15.A Promoting international assistance to support the conservation and wise use of wetlands [15.1]

91. At least 42%, 8 of the 19 Contracting Parties in the region which submitted a National Report (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, El Salvador, Honduras, Jamaica and Venezuela), have recently submitted project proposals to funding agencies with the purpose of obtaining support for the implementation of the Convention. There are projects under preparation in Suriname and Trinidad and Tobago. Eight countries (Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Honduras, Jamaica and Peru) report advances involving the private sector in funding wetland projects. See more details on the role of the private sector in conservation and wise use of wetlands in section 2.7.

92. According to the National Reports, eight Contracting Parties in the Neotropics have mobilized financial support from development aid bodies, or other sources, for matters related to wetlands.

93. Six countries in the region have presented wetland projects to the Global Environmental Fund (GEF): in Argentina at least 5 projects have been approved, besides those financed by other international organizations; in Brazil, 8 projects were approved between 2002 and 2004; a project in Salar del Huasco in Chile is currently under implementation and another project involving indigenous communities in the Puna, in the north of the country, is being evaluated. Colombia submitted the Páramo Andino Project (2005) for consideration; Ecuador participated with an initiative on traditional productive activities in wetlands; and Suriname participated with a project on integrated management for coastal zones.

2.15.B Environmental safeguards and assessments as part of all development projects (including foreign and domestic investments) affecting wetlands [15.2]

94. Regardless of the current EIA legislation in several countries in the region (addressed in section 2.2), seven countries have taken measures, completely (Colombia, Nicaragua, Trinidad and Tobago) or partially (Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador, Jamaica), to cooperate with investors on the possible effects of their projects on wetlands. Similarly, five countries (Belize, Brazil, Chile, Colombia and Ecuador) have established or fostered mechanisms to orient resources originated from wetlands to their own administration and management.

95. This Objective received a high or medium priority in 75% of the cases (9 countries), and limited or very limited resources in 83% (10 countries). Only Trinidad and Tobago reported having adequate resources for implementation. This is the seventh priority in order of importance, according to the National Reports received.

2.16 Financing of the Convention [16.1]

96. 5 out of 15 (33%) of the Contracting Parties in the Neotropics reported being up to date with their contributions to the Convention, but a review of the state of contributions as of 31 July 2005 reveals that more than 50% of the Contracting Parties in the region (Bahamas, Belize, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Jamaica, Dominican Republic, Trinidad & Tobago and Uruguay) are up to date as of 31 December 2004, and some of these are up to date until 31 December 2005. No Contracting Party in the Neotropics made voluntary contributions additional to those of the core budget.

97. Ten Contracting Parties submitted information on their priorities and resources regarding the timely payment of their contributions to the Convention. Six out of these assigned high priority to this item, two of them assigned medium priority, and two more assigned low priority. After analyzing the situation of these countries no relationship was found in the same group of countries between the resources available (75% limited or very limited) and making the payments (up to date by 60% of the countries). This is especially relevant if we consider that those countries making timely payments include those that assigned low priority and very limited resources (Belize), as well as those who assigned high priority and abundant resources (Trinidad y Tobago).

2.17 Institutional mechanisms of the Convention [17.1]

98. From the National Reports submitted to the Secretariat it is concluded that at least 12 of the 19 Contracting Parties in the region (63%) have nominated their Focal Point to assist STRP in its work.

99. The countries that filled up this section assigned high (three countries), medium (four countries) and low priority (two countries) to this Objective. In spite of reporting that available resources are limited (four countries) or very limited (three countries), it is not clear how these resources are allocated. On the other hand, nomination by itself does not contribute to raise the efficiency or effectiveness of the STRP if people nominated do not assist the Secretariat when requested.

2.18 Institutional and financial capacity of Contracting Parties [18.1]

100. Three Contracting Parties in the Neotropics (Bahamas, Chile and Colombia) have reviewed their national institutions related to conservation and wise use of wetlands; 2 Parties (Brazil and the Dominican Republic) are currently under the process of this review; and 6 other Parties (Argentina, Costa Rica, Jamaica, Peru, Trinidad & Tobago, and Venezuela) have partially reviewed their institutions. In total this is 58% of the 19 Contracting Parties submitting a National Report.

101. Nine countries (Belize, Chile, Costa Rica, Ecuador, El Salvador, Jamaica, Nicaragua, Peru and the Dominican Republic) have shown progress in the total or partial fulfillment of establishing coordinating committees of focal points of agreements related to the environment.

102. Argentina, Brazil, Bahamas, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Honduras, Jamaica, Trinidad & Tobago, and Venezuela have a National Ramsar Committee (NRC) or similar body in place. Chile, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Dominican Republic and Suriname are making progress in establishing their Committees. The NRC in Belize has ceased functions and will require being re-vitalized in the future. Thus, 79%, 15 of the 19 Parties that submitted National Report, either have an NRC or similar body, or its establishment is in progress. There are eight inter-sectoral NRCs out of the 10 currently existing; and once established, the NRC in Chile is expected to be inter-sectoral too.

103. The Parties assigned high priority to this Objective in 42% of cases (5 countries), 4 countries assigned medium priority (33%), and the other 2 assigned low (17%). One country considered it non-relevant. The corresponding resources were limited in 58% of cases (7 countries) and very limited in 42% (5 countries).

2.19 Training [20.1]

104. 53%, eight out of the 15 Contracting Parties (Argentina, Bolivia, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Honduras, Dominican Republic and Suriname), have exchanged information, technical assistance and/or specialized knowledge related to training on wetlands with other Contracting Parties.

105. Only 27%, four of the 15 countries in the Neotropics (Colombia, Costa Rica, Suriname, and Trinidad & Tobago), have carried out the analysis of training needs for implementing the Convention guidelines, particularly concerning wise use of wetlands. Among these countries, Costa Rica provided the greatest amount of information about the results of its consultative analysis, where 15 issues and 10 priority actions were identified. Trinidad and Tobago stated that the regional workshop organized by the Ramsar Secretariat before COP8 on the use of Convention Handbooks should be repeated in the future, since the trained personnel has changed functions, and it has more government agencies currently involved.

106. 60%, nine of the 15 Parties in the region have developed (Argentina, Chile, Colombia and Ecuador) or are currently developing (Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Costa Rica and Peru) training activities and modules related to wetlands. Costa Rica submitted detailed information to the Bureau on the first course addressed to wetland managers and technical personnel from the conservation areas in the country, carried out as part of the National Wetlands Program.

107. 53%, eight out of the 15 Parties (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Jamaica, Peru and Trinidad & Tobago), have also offered training opportunities to wetland managers through personnel exchanges or other mechanisms.

108. Even though only Bolivia and Peru reported the submission of projects to the Small Grants Fund (SGF), this fund has supported projects in 21 Contracting Parties in the region (all except Antigua and Barbuda, Belize, Dominican Republic and Saint Lucia), of which 7 have been carried out during the last triennium (Bahamas (2003), Chile (2002), Cuba (2002), Guatemala (2003), Jamaica (2004), Nicaragua (2004) and Uruguay (2002)). For the 2005 project cycle, a proposal from Anguilla (Non Contracting Party) was received, and will be analyzed and taken into consideration by the Standing Committee during its 32nd Meeting at the end of this year.

109. All Contracting Parties in the region, except Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Cuba, Jamaica and the Dominican Republic, have received support from the Wetlands for the Future Initiative (WFF) in the past, and 16 countries (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Guyana (preparatory assistance), Nicaragua, Paraguay, Peru, Saint Lucia, Trinidad & Tobago, Uruguay, and Venezuela) received funding between 2002 and 2005.

110. In terms of the needs analysis of institutional capacities, most of the Parties (58%, 7 out of 12 countries) recognized the importance of that activity, though they gave different answers for implementation. Thus, while Costa Rica promotes development of capacities inside and outside the government, the civil society and the local communities, Suriname has planned to hire experts to train the people responsible for wetlands, and Nicaragua plans to use CREHO to cover its needs in this respect. Finally, Brazil (2002) and Colombia (2005) were the only countries in the Neotropics who mentioned in their National Reports that they had participated of the WATC/RIZA training service, though Ecuador also attended in 2002. In addition, Brazil participated as speaker in that course in 2003.

2.20 Membership to the Convention [21.1]

111. Jamaica, Suriname, and Trinidad and Tobago reported having taken measures to recruit new Contracting Parties into the Convention. The most outstanding effort was made by Trinidad and Tobago, participating in a mission to promote the Convention in at least four non-Party countries in the Caribbean. Since COP8, Antigua and Barbuda (02/10/05) has become the only new Contracting Party in the Neotropics, as of 31 July 2005.


Annex

Summary statistics

Table 1 - Neotropics Sites designated since COP 8

 

Country

Site name

Designation date

Area

(in ha.)

Under-represented wetland types

1

Antigua and Barbuda

Codrington lagoon

02.06.05

¿?

A, B, C, I, G (¿?)

2

Argentina

Humedales Chaco

02.02.04

508,000

Ts

3

Argentina

Reserva Provincial Laguna Brava

02.02.03

405,000

U

4

Argentina

Reserva Ecológica Costanera Sur

22.03.05

353

Ts

5

Brazil

Reserva Particular de Patrimonio Natural - SESC Pantanal

06.12.02

87,871

None

6

Chile

Santuario de la Naturaleza Laguna Conchalí

02.02.04

34

G

7

Chile

Bahía Lomas

06.12.04

58,946

G

8

Colombia

Delta del Río Baudó

05.06.04

8,888

A, B, G, I

9

Costa Rica

Turberas de Talamanca

02.02.03

192,520

U

10

Cuba

Buenavista

18.11.02

313,500

A, B, C, G, I

11

Cuba

Humedal Delta del Cauto(Humedal Ciénaga de Birama)

18.11.02

47,836

A, B, G, I, Ts, U, Xp

12

Cuba

Humedal Máximo-Cagüey

18.11.02

22,000

A, B, G, H, I

13

Cuba

Ciénaga de Lanier y Sur de la Isla de la Juventud

18.11.02

126,200

B, C, G, I, Ts, U

14

Cuba

Gran Humedal del Norte de Ciego de Avila

18.11.02

226,875

A, B, C, G, I

15

Ecuador

Humedales del Sur de Isabela

17.09.02

872

A, G, I

16

Ecuador

Parque Nacional Cajas

14.08.02

29,477

Ts

17

Ecuador

Reserva Ecológica Cayapas-Mataje

12.06.03

44,847

A, I, Ts, Xp

18

Honduras

Laguna de Bacalar

03.02.03

7,394

I

19

Honduras

Subcuenca del Lago de Yojoa

15.06.05

43,640

Ts, Xp, Zk(b)

20

Jamaica

Palisadoes - Port Royal

22.04.05

7,523

A, B, C, G, I

21

Panama

Bahía de Panamá

20.10.03

48,919

A, G, I, Ts

22

Paraguay

Laguna Chaco Lodge

20.10.03

2,500

None

23

Paraguay

Laguna Teniente Rojas Silva

14.07.04

8,470

Ts

24

Peru

Bofedales y Laguna de Salinas

28.10.03

17,657

U

25

Peru

Complejo de Humedales del Abanico del río Pastaza

05.06.02

3,827,329

Ts

26

Peru

Laguna del Indio y Dique de los Españoles

28.10.03

502

U

27

Uruguay

Estero de Farrapos e Islas del Río Uruguay

10.12.04

17,496

Ts

 

TOTAL

 

 

6,054,649

 

 

Key for under-represented wetland types:

Marine/Coastal Wetlands
A Permanent shallow marine waters in most cases less than six metres deep at low tide; includes sea bays and straits.
B Marine sub-tidal aquatic beds; includes kelp beds, sea-grass beds, tropical marine meadows.
C Coral reefs.
G Intertidal mud, sand or salt flats.
I Intertidal forested wetlands; includes mangrove swamps, nipah swamps and tidal freshwater swamp forests.
Zk(a) Karst and other subterranean hydrological systems, marine/coastal.

Inland Wetlands:
Ts Seasonal / intermittent fresh water marshes/pools on inorganic soils; includes sloughs, potholes, seasonally flooded meadows, sedge marshes.
U Non-forested peatlands; includes shrub or open bogs, swamps, fens.
Xp Forested peatlands; peat swamp forests.
Zk(b) Karst and other subterranean hydrological systems, inland.

Human-made Wetlands
Zk(c) Karst and other subterranean hydrological systems, human-made.

Table 2 - Update Status of Ramsar Information Sheets (RIS) and Maps

Country

Site Name

AREA (ha)

Last RIS update

Comments

Antigua and Barbuda

Codrington lagoon

¿?

2005

RIS and map are required

Argentina

Bahía de Samborombón

243,965

1997

RIS and map require update

 

Laguna Blanca

11,250

1996

RIS and map require update

 

Laguna de Llancanelo MR

65,000

1995

RIS and map require update

 

Laguna de los Pozuelos

16,224

1996

RIS and map require update

 

Reserva Costa Atlántica de Tierra del Fuego

28,600

1995

RIS and map require update

 

Río Pilcomayo

55,000

1996

RIS and map require update

Bahamas

Inagua National Park

32,600

1997/1998

RIS (1997) and map (1998) require update

Bolivia

Lago Titicaca (Sector Boliviano)

800,000

1998

RIS and map require update

 

Laguna Colorada

51,318

1998

RIS and map require update

Brazil

Ilha do Bananal

562,312

1998

RIS and map require update

 

Lagoa do Peixe

34,400

1998

RIS and map require update

 

Mamirauá

1,124,000

1998

RIS and map require update

 

Pantanal Matogrossense

135,000

1998

RIS and map require update

 

Reentrancias Maranhenses

2,680,911

1998

RIS and map require update

Chile

Carlos Anwandter Sanctuary

4,877

1998

RIS and map require update

 

Humedal el Yali

520

1996

RIS and map require update

 

Laguna del Negro Francisco y Laguna Santa Rosa

62,460

1996

RIS and map require update

 

Salar de Surire

15,858

1996

RIS and map require update

 

Salar de Tara

5,443

1996

RIS and map require update

 

Salar del Huasco

6,000

1996

RIS and map require update

 

Sistema hidrológico de Soncor

5,016

1996

RIS and map require update

Colombia

Sistema Delta Estuarino del Río Magdalena, Ciénaga Grande de Santa Marta

400,000

1998

RIS and map require update

Costa Rica

Caño Negro

9,969

1991

RIS and map require update

 

Gandoca-Manzanillo

9,445

1995

RIS and map require update

 

Humedal Caribe Noreste

75,310

1996

RIS and map require update

 

Isla del Coco

99,623

1998

RIS and map require update

 

Laguna Respringue

75

1999

RIS and map require update

 

Manglar de Potrero Grande

139

1999

RIS and map require update

 

Tamarindo

500

1993

RIS and map require update

 

Terraba-Sierpe

30,654

1995

RIS and map require update

Ecuador

Machalilla

14,430

1997

RIS and map require update

 

Manglares Churute

35,042

1998

RIS and map require update

 

Reserva Biológica Limoncocha

4,613

1998

RIS and map require update

El Salvador

Area Natural Protegida Laguna del Jocotal

1,571

1999

RIS and map require update

Guatemala

Parque Nacional Laguna del Tigre MR

335,080

1998

RIS and map require update

 

Refugio de Vida Silvestre Bocas del Polochic

21,227

1996

RIS and map require update

Honduras

Barras de Cuero y Salado

13,225

1993

RIS and map require update. Additional information was received in the National Report (1996)

 

Parque Nacional Jeanette Kawas

78,150

1995

RIS and map require update. Additional information was received in the National Report (1996)

 

Refugio de Vida Silvestre Punta Izopo

11,200

1996

RIS and map require update

 

Sistema de Humedales de la Zona Sur de Honduras

69,711

1999

RIS and map require update

Jamaica

Black River Lower Morass

5,700

1997

RIS and map require update

Panama

Golfo de Montijo

80,765

1990

RIS and map require update

 

Punta Patiño

13,805

1993

RIS and map require update

 

San San-Pond Sak

16,414

1993

RIS and map require update

Paraguay

Estero Milagro

25,000

1995

RIS and map require update

 

Lago Ypoá

100,000

1995

RIS and map require update

 

Río Negro

370,000

1995

RIS and map require update

 

Tinfunque

280,000

1995

RIS and map require update

Peru

Lago Titicaca (sector peruano)

460,000

1996

RIS and map require update

 

Pacaya Samiria

2,080,000

1992

RIS and map require update

 

Paracas

335,000

1992

RIS and map require update

 

Reserva Nacional de Junín

53,000

1996

RIS and map require update

 

Santuario Nacional Los Manglares de Tumbes

2,972

1996

RIS and map require update

 

Zona Reservada Los Pantanos de Villa

263

1996

RIS and map require update

Surinam

Coppenamemonding

12,000

1997

RIS and map require update

Trinidad & Tobago

Nariva Swamp

6,234

1997

RIS and map require update

Venezuela

Archipiélago Los Roques

213,220

1996

RIS and map require update

 

Ciénaga de Los Olivitos

26,000

1996

RIS and map require update

 

Cuare

9,968

1991

RIS and map require update

 

Laguna de la Restinga

5,248

1996

RIS and map require update

 

Laguna de Tacarigua

9,200

1996

RIS and map require update

Table 3 - Neotropics Ramsar site list and management plan status

Country

Site Name

Area (ha)

Management Plan

Additional comments

Antigua and Barbuda

Codrington lagoon

¿?

No

Ramsar File has not yet been received

Argentina

Bahía de Samborombón

243,965

No

No current plans for a MP. (NR, 2002)

 

Humedales Chaco

508,000

No

No information available

 

Laguna Blanca

11,250

Yes

Submitted by the site manager in 2002

 

Laguna de Llancanelo MR

65,000

Yes

Participative Management Plan and creation of Coordinating Committee 2005

 

Laguna de los Pozuelos

16,224

Yes

Biannual Operative Plan (NR 2005). Support for implementation through SGF and WFF projects.

 

Lagunas de Guanacache

580,000

No

MP under preparation. (NR, 2002)

 

Lagunas de Vilama

157,000

Yes

Planning within the High Andean Wetlands Program (NR, 2002). Support from SGF and WFF within the context of High Andean Wetlands.

 

Reserva Costa Atlántica de Tierra del Fuego

28,600

No

MP under preparation (NR 2005)

 

Río Pilcomayo

55,000

Yes

Biannual Operative Plan (NR 2005). Support from SGF and WFF within the context of High Andean Wetlands.

 

Jaaukanigás

492,000

No

 No information available

 

Lagunas y Esteros del Iberá

24,550

No

MP is a long term objective (NR 2005)

 

Reserva Provincial Laguna Brava

405,000

No

Preliminary design of MP completed (RIS, 2002)

 

Bañados del Río Dulce y Laguna de Mar Chiquita.

996,000

No

Does not have MP (RIS, 2002)

 

Reserva Ecológica Costanera Sur

353

Yes

MP formalized

Total Area

 

 3,582,942

 

 

Bahamas

Inagua National Park

32,600

Yes

In spite of not having plans to elaborate a MP (NR, 2002), it has been reported that the MP already exists (NR, 2005).

Total Area

 

 32,600

 

 

Belize

Crooked Tree Wildlife Sanctuary

6,637

Yes

Five year MP prepared, waiting for approval

Total Area

 

 6,637

 

 

Bolivia

Cuenca de Tajzara

5,500

Yes

 MP planned with community participation 2000

 

Lago Titicaca (Sector Boliviano)

800,000

Yes

NR 2002- MP under development. Joint plan with Peru.

 

Laguna Colorada

51,318

Yes

Extension of site in RIS 1998, based on the original 5240 ha

 

Bañados de Izozog y el Río Parapetí

615,882

Yes

Partial MP for Humedales Chaco

 

Palmar de la Islas y las Salinas de San José

856,754

No

 No conservation or management measures

 

Pantanal Boliviano

3,189,888

No

Only isolated management measures. There is no administration in the site, 2001

 

Laguna Concepción

31,124

No

Designation in May, 2002.

 

Lagos Poopó y Uru Uru

967,607

No

Designation in July, 2002.

Total Area

 

 6,518,073

 

 

Brazil

Baixada Maranhense Environmental Protection Area

1,775,036

No

Only isolated management measures

 

Ilha do Bananal

562,312

Yes

Emergency plan formalized. MP for Araguaia under revision in 2002 (NR, 2002)

 

Lagoa do Peixe

34,400

Yes

Development of MP in 1996. Almost fully formalized (NR, 2002)

 

Mamirauá

1,124,000

Yes

MP developed in 1996; approved by the population in 1997

 

Pantanal Matogrossense

135,000

Yes

Emergency plan since 1996. MP under final phase of preparation (NR, 2002).

 

Parque Estadual Marinho do Parcel Manoel Luís including the Baixios do Mestre Álvaro & Tarol

34,556

No

MP development planned for January 2000

 

Reentrancias Maranhenses

2,680,911

No

MP under planning.

 

Reserva Particular de Patrimonio Natural - SESC Pantanal

87,871

Yes

 MP being updated 2003.

Total Area

 

 6,434,086

 

 

Chile

Carlos Anwandter Sanctuary

4,877

Yes

1998 – MP waiting for approval CONAF

 

Humedal el Yali

520

No

MP under preparation (NR, 2002)

 

Laguna del Negro Francisco y Laguna Santa Rosa

62,460

Yes

MP as part of Protected Wildlife Area (NR, 2002)

 

Salar de Surire

15,858

Yes

MP as part of Protected Wildlife Area (NR, 2002)

 

Salar de Tara

5,443

Yes

MP as part of Protected Wildlife Area (NR, 2002)

 

Salar del Huasco

6,000

No

Only flamingo counting by CONAF/UNORCH 

 

Sistema hidrológico de Soncor

5,016

Yes

MP as part of Protected Wildlife Area (NR,2002)

 

Santuario de la Naturaleza Laguna Conchalí

34

Yes

“Wetland Natural Resources Follow-up Plan” (RIS).

 

Bahía Lomas

58,946

No

Seeking funds to prepare Environmental Management Plan, 2004

Total Area

 

 159,154

 

 

Colombia

Laguna de la Cocha

39,000

Yes

MP completed in 2002 (NR, 2002)

 

Sistema Delta Estuarino del Río Magdalena,Ciénaga Grande de Santa Marta

400,000

Yes

MP completed in 2002 (NR, 2002) with support from SGF.

 

Delta del Río Baudó

8,888

No

Activities planned to promote wise use of the wetland

Total Area

 

 447,888

 

 

Costa Rica

Caño Negro

9,969

Yes

MP since 1994

 

Cuenca Embalse Arenal

67,296

Yes

MP not completely formalized (NR, 2002). Support provided through WFF.

 

Gandoca-Manzanillo

9,445

Yes

MP formalized (NR, 2002)

 

Humedal Caribe Noreste

75,310

Yes

MP implemented (NR, 2002). Various programs being executed.

 

Isla del Coco

99,623

Yes

MP being updated (NR, 2002).

 

Laguna Respringue

75

Yes

MP of Parque Nacional Santa Rosa is applied since it is enclosed in this park

 

Manglar de Potrero Grande

139

Yes

MP of Parque Nacional Santa Rosa is applied since it is enclosed in this park

 

Palo Verde MR

24,519

Yes

MP being updated (NR, 2002). Supported by WFF. Area: 4719 ha. in 2002.

 

Tamarindo

500

No

MINAE currently developing MP (NR, 2002)

 

Terraba-Sierpe

30,654

Yes

 RIS on diskette in file. PM applied (NR, 2002)

 

Turberas de Talamanca

192,520

No

 Not planned, 2002

Total Area

 

 510,050

 

 

Cuba

Cienaga de Zapata

452,000

Yes

MP under revision (NR, 2002)

 

Buenavista

313,500

No

MP under preparation (NR, 2002)

 

Humedal Delta del Cauto(Humedal Ciénaga de Birama)

47,836

Yes

Five year MP finalized in 1999 (RIS, 2002). MP under preparation (NR, 2002)

 

Humedal Máximo-Caguey

22,000

No

MP under preparation (NR, 2002)

 

Ciénaga de Lanier y Sur de la Isla de la Juventud

126,200

No

MP under preparation (NR, 2002). Plans in some protected areas.

 

Gran Humedal del Norte de Ciego de Avila

226,875

No

MP under preparation (NR, 2002). Plans in some protected areas.

Total Area

 

 1,188,411

 

 

Ecuador

Abras de Mantequilla

22,500

No

MP under preparation (NR, 2002) with support from WWF.

 

Isla Santay

4,705

Yes

MP under preparation (NR, 2002). Finalized in 2002.

 

La Segua

1,836

Yes

MP developed 1994-1997. Approved by the population 1998. Partially formalized.

 

Machalilla

14,430

Yes

 Original MP from 1987. Tourism management plan since 1996. New MP planned for 1998.

 

Manglares Churute

35,042

Yes

 MP in execution since 1996.

 

Reserva Biológica Limoncocha

4,613

No

MP under preparation (NR, 2002)

 

Laguna de Cube

113

Yes

MP developed by WWF Living Waters Campaign

 

Refugio de Vida Silvestre Isla Santa Clara

46

No

Lack of resources to make MP (NR, 2002)

 

Humedales del Sur de Isabela

872

No

Ecotourism plan, wetlands management plan, and MP to be developed.

 

Parque Nacional Cajas

29,477

Yes

Comprehensive MP developed in 2002 with support from IDB.

 

Reserva Ecológica Cayapas-Mataje

44,847

Yes

MP developed with the population. Limited application due to lack of resources.

Total Area

 

 158,481

 

 

El Salvador

Area Natural Protegida Laguna del Jocotal

1,571

Yes

Fully applied management plan (NR, 2002)

Total Area

 

 1,571

 

 

Guatemala

Manchón-Guamuchal

13,500

No

No MP since this is a private reservation with low human pressure (NR, 2002)

 

Parque Nacional Laguna del Tigre MR

335,080

Yes

MP applied (NR, 2002)

 

Punta de Manabique

132,900

Yes

MP applied (NR, 2002)

 

Refugio de Vida Silvestre Bocas del Polochic

21,227

Yes

MP applied (NR, 2002)

Total Area

 

 502,707

Yes

 

Honduras

Barras de Cuero y Salado

13,225

Yes

Preliminary MP 1993. MP under development (NR, 2002)

 

Parque Nacional Jeanette Kawas

78,150

Yes

MP being updated 2005

 

Refugio de Vida Silvestre Punta Izopo

11,200

Yes

MP developed in 1994

 

Sistema de Humedales de la Zona Sur de Honduras

69,711

No

MP under development (NR, 2002), (NR, 2005).

 

Laguna de Bacalar

7,394

Yes

Mentioned in NR 2005.

 

Subcuenca del Lago de Yojoa

43,640

Yes

MP approved for 2003-2008.

Total Area

 

 223,320

 

 

Jamaica

Black River Lower Morass

5,700

No

Preliminary MP to be completed in 2004 (NR, 2002).

 

Palisadoes - Port Royal

7,523

Yes

MP not formalized

Total Area

 

13,223 

 

 

Nicaragua

Los Guatuzos

43,750

Yes

MP approved in 1996. NGO responsible for application

 

Lago de Apanás - Asturias

5,415

No

MP planned, 2000. Montreux Record.

 

Sistema de Humedales de la Bahía de Bluefields

86,501

No

Under development (NR, 2002)

 

Cayos Miskitos y Franja Costera Inmediata

85,000

Yes

General MP for the Reservation exists, but it is applied only partially, 2002.

 

Deltas del Estero Real y Llanos de Apacunca

81,700

No

Management guidelines under official decree 1983.

 

Refugio de Vida Silvestre Río San Juan

43,000

Yes

 MP formalized.

 

Sistemas Lacustres, Palustres y Riberinos del municipio de San Miguelito

43,475

No

Under development (NR, 2002)

 

Sistema Lagunar de Tisma

16,850

No

MP under development for the part that is a Natural Reserve (NR, 2002)

Total Area

 

405,691

 

 

Panama

Bahía de Panamá

48,919

No

 

 

Golfo de Montijo

80,765

No

Annual operational plan, MP under preparation (NR, 2002).

 

Punta Patiño

13,805

Yes

MP currently exists 1993. 

 

San San-Pond Sak

16,414

No

Has a current annual operational plan. MP under preparation (NR, 2002)

Total Area

 

 159,903

 

 

Paraguay

Estero Milagro

25,000

No

No information available, 1995.

 

Lago Ypoá

100,000

No

No information available, 1995.

 

Laguna Chaco Lodge

2,500

No

MP not planned, 2003.

 

Río Negro

370,000

No

No information available, 1995.

 

 

Tinfunque

280,000

No

 MP not planned, 1995.

 

Laguna Teniente Rojas Silva

8,470

No

 MP not planned, 1995.

Total Area

 

 785,970

 

 

Peru

Bofedales y Laguna de Salinas

17,657

Yes

Reserva Nacional de Salinas y Aguada Blanca MP is applied

 

Complejo de Humedales del Abanico del río Pastaza

3,827,329

No

Only isolated fisheries initiatives, 2002.

 

Lago Titicaca (sector peruano)

460,000

Yes

Management cooperation with Bolivia; master plan for Reserva Nacional del Titicaca under revision (IN, 2002)

 

Laguna del Indio y Dique de los Españoles

502

Yes

MP for Reserva Nacional de Salinas y Aguada Blanca is applied.

 

Pacaya Samiria

2,080,000

No

There are other legal mechanisms under application.

 

Paracas

335,000

Yes

Master Plan for RN Paracas is currently under revision, (NR, 2002)

 

Reserva Nacional de Junín

53,000

Yes

MP applied (NR, 2002)

 

Santuario Nacional Lagunas de Mejía

691

Yes

Several natural resources MPs in place. Partially applied.

 

Santuario Nacional Los Manglares de Tumbes

2,972

Yes

MP applied (NR, 2002)

 

Zona Reservada Los Pantanos de Villa

263

Yes

MP applied (NR, 2002)

Total Area

 

 6,777,414

 

 

Dominican Republic

Lago Enriquillo

20,000

No

There is no MP, 2001

Total Area

 

 20,000

 

 

Saint Lucia

Mankoté Mangrove

60

Yes

Management strategy under application

 

Savannes Bay

25

No

No information available, 2002

Total Area

 

 85

 

 

Surinam

Coppenamemonding

12,000

Yes

 “North Saramacca Area” MP is applied

Total Area

 

 12,000

Yes

 

Trinidad & Tobago

Nariva Swamp

6,234

Yes

MP and other documents prepared, 1999

Total Area

 

 6,234

Yes

 

Uruguay

Bañados del Este y Franja Costera MR

407,408

Yes

There are various studies and documents for its management.

 

Estero de Farrapos e Islas del Río Uruguay

17,496

Yes

MP under preparation, 2004.

Total Area

 

 424,904

 

 

Venezuela

Archipiélago Los Roques

213,220

Yes

There is no MP. It has an Ordering Plan and Regulations of Use (NR, 2002).

 

Ciénaga de Los Olivitos

26,000

Yes

There is no MP. It has an Ordering Plan and Regulations of Use (NR, 2002).

 

Cuare

9,968

Yes

There is no MP. It has an Ordering Plan and Regulations of Use (NR, 2002).

 

Laguna de la Restinga

5,248

Yes

There is no MP. It has an Ordering Plan and Regulations of Use (NR, 2002)

 

Laguna de Tacarigua

9,200

Yes

There is no MP. It has an ordering Plan and Regulations of Use (NR, 2002)

Total Area

 

 263,636

 

 

TOTAL

 

28,634,980

75

 

For reasons of economy, this document is printed in a limited number, and will not be distributed at the meeting. Delegates are requested to bring their copies to the meeting and not to request additional copies.

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