Ramsar and the Small Island Developing States {2}

28/03/2003


Ramsar's past, on-going and future activities related to Small Island Developing States (SIDS)

Annex 3

Developing Island States and Developing countries members of AOSIS Ramsar Financed projects

Wetlands for the Future Fund (WWF)

Country

Year funded

Project name

Comments

Belize

1995-1996

Towards the wise use and conservation of the Crooked Tree Wildlife Sanctuary

This activity aimed at increasing local support through dialogue and promoting involvement of the local community, so that the community could play a more direct role in the management and conservation of Crooked Tree. The project included funds for the preparation of a training handbook on conflict management which incorporates an account of the experience gained.

Caribbean Workshop (Trinidad)

2000

Caribbean Wetland Workshop

Funding was provided to support the organization of the Ramsar/SPAW (Special Protected Areas and Wildlife under the Cartagena Convention) Training Workshop in Trinidad & Tobago, 11-15 December, 2000. The workshop included presentations on the SPAW protocol, Ramsar Convention benefits and Ramsar's National Planning Tool, and a wetlands field training exercise.

Caribbean

2001

Mangrove Curriculum Transfer

The NGO Mangrove Action Project is broadening the scope of its environmental education programme by adapting and translating its education curriculum on mangroves to Spanish, to be used in the schools of coastal Honduras and other Caribbean island status. Additionally, 100 teachers will be trained at workshops in Honduras and San Andres island, Colombia.

Guyana

2002

Preparatory assistance for Guyana's accession to Ramsar

Currently in progress, the project aims to build the capacity of government environmental agencies and NGO partners for the integrated, collaborative management of Guyana’s wetland systems, as well as to assist Guyana’s accession to the Ramsar convention and identify the first wetland in Guyana for Ramsar recognition.

Saint Lucia

1995-1996

Management of wetland information support of public awareness and training in the insular Caribbean

This project assisted the Caribbean Natural Resources Institute (CANARI) in upgrading its capacity to provide help and technical references about wetland management at regional, national and local level through networking and electronic communication facilities.

Saint Lucia

1997

Training in participatory and collaborative approaches to wetland management in the insular Caribbean

This project was intended to support and strengthen the participation and collaboration for wetland conservation and management in the Caribbean. A case study and teaching module were prepared, which were made available to training and resource management institutions within and outside the region.

Saint Lucia

1998

Capacity building in participatory wetland and forest management for the Trinidad and Tobago Forestry Division personnel, in St Lucia

The grant from WFF permitted the participation of two officers from the Trinidad and Tobago Forestry Division in a two-week regional training course on Skills and Methods for Participatory and Collaborative Natural Resource Management. The course was found to be highly relevant to the officers’ work, particularly the activities related to the stimulation of local participation in the management of the Nariva Swamp, a Ramsar site.

Saint Lucia

1999

Training resources for participatory and collaborative natural resource management in the Caribbean

Support for the participation of two officials from the Trinidad & Tobago Forestry Division to attend a workshop in St. Lucia on design and implementation of forest and wetlands projects and participative programs, with the aim of strengthening the institutional capacity of the country’s administrative authority.

Suriname

1997

Creation of a mobile environmental education and public awareness lecture series/slide-film-video program

Funding was provided for development of a mobile unit to work with communities living in the interior of the country and close to important wetlands, about the risks of natural resources exploitation, emphasising the multiple benefits of wise use of wetlands.

Suriname

1998

Training of reserve managers abroad

Funding was provided to train three Reserve managers from Suriname for two weeks in Trinidad & Tobago with the Wildlife Section of the Forestry Division at the Pointe-a-Pierre wildlife site. The training is intended to reinforce theoretical knowledge and give practical training on the application of wise use concepts.

Trinidad and Tobago

1998

Fires in Nariva: fire fighting training, assessment of lessons learned and preparation of fire prevention and suppression plan for a tropical Ramsar site

A workshop was organized for the purpose of training local communities and Forestry Division personnel in firefighting techniques, as well as supplying the necessary equipment. An evaluation on the year’s forest fires was conducted and a mitigation plan was elaborated.

B Scchreiber, SCO

1997

Support for the Communities - Working for Wetlands Workshop, South and Central America and Caribbean

Terrene Institute - Financial support for three speakers of the Neotropical Region to participate in a workshop, the principal goal of which was to promote wetland conservation through a community approach. The workshop was held in the United States of America in May 1996.

Ramsar Bureau

1998

A special publication for the Small Island Developing States

Production of a color brochure that summarizes in a clear and concise manner the reasons for island states to adhere to the Convention.

Society of Caribbean Ornithology

1998

Publication and distribution of "Caribbean Seabirds: conservation status and action plans" Program

Financial support was provided for the publication of the results of the Symposium on Seabirds, in the framework of the Ornithological Society of the Caribbean’s annual meeting, August 1-17, 1997.

Workshops

2000

CARIBWA First Annual Conference/Workshop Brac Reef Resort, Cayman Islands August 25 to 27, 2000

Support was provided to the Caribbean & Western Atlantic Marine Educators Association (CARIBWA) for organizing a workshop on marine and aquatic techniques and resources for environmental education.

Ramsar Small Grants Fund

Country

Year Funded

Project name

Comments

Comoros

1997

Rehabilitation and management of lake Dziani Boundouni

An SGF grant was approved with the long-term aim of rehabilitating lake Dziani Boudouni, the country’s only Ramsar site, with the main objective of developing and implementing a management plan for the wise use of the area’s natural resources and the encouragement of the local communities, particularly women, to participate actively in the process of restoring and conserving this wetland and thus maintaining its ecological character. The participation of the private sector was also encouraged. Village associations for the protection of environment, called "Ulangua", have in the past carried out significant activities for the preservation of lake Dziani Boudouni, but have been discouraged by the lack of support from the authorities concerned. Activities also included monitoring of the site, development of public awareness materials for tourists and others, and establishment of signals and a botanical nature trail in the forest.

Cuba

2002

Preparation for participative management of coastal wetlands in northeast Cuba

The project seeks to address the general lack of recognition of wetlands’ values and benefits. The specific objectives will include the characterization of the coastal wetlands of northeast Cuba, as a way of contributing to the development of participative management plans; plus community/institutional capacity building through workshops and creation of information materials for developing local awareness.

Fiji

2002

Institutional capacity building and review of training needs for implementation of the Ramsar Convention in Fiji

Fiji is preparing for accession to the Convention, and this project will assist it in preparing for implementation through a review of the national legal and institutional framework, development of a Ramsar-related training course for government personnel, and a training needs assessment.

Guinea

1994

Safeguard of the Tristao Islands

One of the most important stopping places in Africa for migrating waterbirds, the Tristao Islands form an estuarine complex at the mouth of the river Kogon in northwestern Guinea. This Ramsar site has for some time been under increasing threat by humans, particularly illegal hunting and the disturbance of birds during nesting periods. The grant allowed improved management of the site, with boundary delimitation, sign-posting, mangrove replanting, and training for managers, as well as the development of a programme of public awareness and community participation.

Jamaica

1997

Towards management of the Black River Morass (Ramsar site) - gathering biological, social and economic data

The Black River Morass (Ramsar site) includes the largest herbaceous wetland system in Jamaica, including upwelling ponds, springs, flooded areas, brackish coastal lagoons, and salt ponds. It also functions as a habitat for rare plants, animals, and migrant waterfowl. The need for protection of this area has become critical as threats have increased drastically (pollution from agriculture, aquaculture, industrial activities, and tourism). The objective of the project was to collect, analyze, and map biological, social, and economic data, followed by the development of a management plan, including legal aspects and continuous monitoring.

Madagascar

2000

Workshop on the development of a national strategy for the conservation and sustainable use of wetlands in Madagascar

A grant was allocated for the development of Wetland Policy/Strategies and the review of legislative frameworks and the preparation of a law to be submitted to the parliament, as a first step toward the formulation of a National Wetland Policy. Education and information dissemination activities will be carried out along with the review of existing legislation and regulations, using the Ramsar Guidelines for reviewing laws and institutions. Field visits were undertaken to assess the major threats to wetland conservation and wise use in order to take appropriate steps in the process of legislative review. This project was a good example of what is expected from an active and forceful Ramsar National Committee.

Mauritius

2002

"Wetlands community awareness programme for Rivulet Terre Rouge Estuary Bird Sanctuary (RTREBS) And Bassin Sarcelle".

This is an emergency proposal to save critical wetlands through education and public awareness of wetlands values and functions. RTREBS is a migratory bird sanctuary whereas Bassin Sarcelle is a mangrove site. Both have rich ecosystems but are relatively fragile, and both need urgent protection as well as community training and involvement in their conservation. Given their ecotourism potential, the development and management of the sites represent important socio-economic assets. The project will address the lack of appropriate community-based education and sensitization at the level of the community leaders regarding the importance of wetlands and their conservation.

Oceania

1995

Preparatory assistance for accession to the Ramsar Convention of five island states: Kiribati, Federated States of Micronesia, Palau, Solomon Islands, Vanuatu

Five countries from Oceania – Kiribati, Federated States of Micronesia, Palau, Solomon Islands and Vanuatu – requested preparatory assistance for accession to the Ramsar Convention. A funding package was approved in support of their efforts. The Australian Nature Conservation Agency, in cooperation with the Oceania branch of Wetlands International – Asia Pacific administered the funds and established the necessary contacts with the authorities of these countries.

Palau

2002

Support for training and management actions at Palau’s first Ramsar site, Lake Ngardok Nature Reserve

This project is designed to implement specific priority management actions identified in the management plan which has been prepared for Palau’s 1st Ramsar site. Specifically it will undertake training and capacity-building for the site manager, implementation of erosion control and reforestation plans designed to improve the ecological character of the site, and the establishment of a nature trail which will support income generation for future site management.

Papua New Guinea

1992

Regional Wetland Management Workshop

Support was provided for carrying out the Regional Wetland Management Workshop in 1993.

Papua New Guinea

1994

Promotion of Ramsar membership in the South Pacific

Only one of 13 South Pacific countries was at that time a Contracting Party to the Ramsar Convention, but the Regional Workshop held in Port Moresby in June 1994, partly funded by the SGF, created a great deal of interest. The South Pacific subregion of Oceania includes many extremely important wetlands, and it was hoped that the Meeting of the Parties in Brisbane in 1996 would provide impetus for development of the Convention in the area. The project permitted promotion of the Convention and its values during the lead-up to Brisbane, principally through activities conducted by the Oceania Program of the then-Asian Wetland Bureau, and assistance in preparing accession documentation.

Papua New Guinea

1997

Capacity building and training for the Department of Environment and Conservation

At least one third of Papua New Guinea (PNG) could be classified as wetland. In addition to diverse types of wetlands, PNG is rich in wetland species, especially waterbirds, endemic fishes and corals. Wetlands provide many benefits for the local people, such as export earnings, personal income and livelihoods, but they are now facing threats from catchment changes, pollution, mining and exotic species. The Department of Environment and Conservation, the lead agency for conservation and wise use of wetlands in PNG, has inadequate technical skills and resources for that work, and the grant enhanced the Department’s capacity through desk and field-based training which created a wetlands team in the Department with increased expertise, including field survey techniques and management and improved project management capability.

Papua New Guinea

1999

Development of a strategy & capacity for management & nomination of Ramsar sites

The project arose from the need to establish full-time, in-country technical support to the government in implementing the Convention, and its aim was to develop mechanisms for effective management of PNG’s Ramsar sites and a strategic approach to nomination of new sites, chiefly through a working partnership of the Department of Environment and Conservation, Wetlands International, and a locally-based NGO. A "wetlands support officer" was hosted by the NGO and directed by Wetlands International and provided substantial input to Ramsar activities of the Department. Through on-site consultation with landowners, the officer provided updated site information and developed a mechanism for effective management of PNG’s Ramsar sites by local communities. A database of important PNG wetlands was to be created and used in developing a framework for new Ramsar site nominations.

Papua New Guinea

2001

Development and maintenance of a PNG wetland database and education and awareness of the importance of wetlands

The grant assisted the Department of Environment and Conservation to identify and document all wetland types in the country through literature review and site visits, whilst promoting the importance of maintaining the ecological characteristics of the wetlands, including Ramsar sites, through the development of a national wetlands education and public awareness (EPA) programme. The EPA targeted a wide range of people, including key decision-makers, communities living in and around wetlands, other wetland users, and the general public. A wetlands database was a major output of the project and was used as a basis for developing a conservation and management strategy for the wetlands of the country in collaboration with the Wetlands International - Oceania Programme and the PNG office of WWF South Pacific.

Philippines

1996

Olango Island Wildlife Sanctuary stakeholder analysis

One of the most important migratory bird areas in the Philippines, Olango Island Wildlife Sanctuary was declared a Ramsar site in 1994. As a site managed historically by local communities, the implementation of stricter management and protection rules have created some conflicts in the area. The project was designed to increase knowledge on the wise use of resources by local people, as well as to involve them in participatory sustainable management.

Philippines

1998

Comprehensive management planning and institutionalization of the Protected Areas Management Board (PAMB) of the Naujan Lake National Park

In support of comprehensive management planning of the Protected Area Management Board (PAMB) of the Naujan Lake National Park, the project’s main objective was not only to develop an integrated management plan for the Park, based on the findings of a UNDP-funded project, but also to ensure the active participation of all major stakeholders in its implementation. This contributed towards the implementation of the National Integrated Protected Areas System (NIPAS) of 1992. The project also aimed to strengthen the capacity of the Protected Areas Management Board (PAMB), the multi-sectoral body responsible for the management of the park, through a series of workshops on topics such as the interpretation of the NIPAS Act and implementation of the management plan.

Sri Lanka

1997

Bellanwila-Attidiya Sanctuary: improving visitor facilities and increasing awareness

The project aimed at improving visitor facilities and increasing awareness in the Bellanwila-Attidiya Sanctuary, located in the southeastern outskirts of Colombo. The area is reputed for the large number and variety of wildlife, especially birds, and is an important roosting site for herons and egrets. The environmental degradation of the area is caused by water pollution, garbage dumping, land filling, inadequate visitors’ facilities, and a general lack of public awareness, and a working group has been established to identify priorities for raising public awareness of the value of the marsh and developing its ecotourism potential. The project formed part of the Bellanwila-Attidiya Management Conservation Plan and was carried out in cooperation with the Department of Wildlife Conservation, with the assistance of the IUCN Sri Lanka Country Office.

Sri Lanka

1999

Understanding the ecological character of the lagoon system in Bundala National Park

The project was part of a larger project, "Irrigation Water Management and Bundala National Park," which was intended to devise a water quality and quantity monitoring system and assess the economic values of the resources on-site. The Park is the only Ramsar site in the country and is home to a wide range of species from elephants to turtles, but due to the flow of irrigation water from upstream, desalinization and eutrophication have become serious problems in the lagoons. The grant was used for investigation of the ecological characteristics of Bundala National Park, establishment of a database to aid in site management (including mapping of information about the Park and surrounding area by using GIS), and quantifying the identified ecological characters.

Sri Lanka

2002

Facilitating the conservation and wise use of the Anaiwilundawa Wetland Sanctuary through the identification of appropriate management interventions and local community and institutional capacity building

The project seeks to undertake follow-up activities after Ramsar site designation of a wetland of considerable local community, historical and cultural significance. The project will address a number of threats to the ecological character of the site by working with local communities (including farmers’ cooperatives) through education and public awareness and by strengthening appropriate sustainable livelihoods including increasing ecotourism.

Trinidad & Tobago

1996

Toward the development of a management plan for the wise use of Nariva Swamp

With the long-term aim of developing a management plan for Nariva Swamp, this project was a follow-up to the recommendations of the 1995 Ramsar Advisory Mission to the site, which called for, among other things, an Environmental Impact Assessment of Sector B of the swamp that would also take into consideration the environmental, social and economic issues related to the entire catchment area. The EIA was to provide the specific information necessary to designate categories of conservation/use of Nariva that would form the basis for development of the management plan.

Trinidad & Tobago

1998

Nariva Swamp: Filling in of the irrigation channels aiming at rehabilitation of the Block B Area

Nariva Swamp was designated as a Ramsar site in 1992 and listed on the Montreux Record of threatened sites in 1993. Illegal squatting by rice farmers and ad hoc rice farming methods within Block B of the swamp resulted in the construction of 15 irrigation channels. This has affected the hydrology of the swamp, and there has been a rapid draining of the marshes at the onset of the dry season. Extreme dryness made the area conducive to bush fires and more than 3,000 acres of marshlands have been destroyed. Funds were approved as emergency assistance for filling in the 15 irrigation channels in order to assist in the rehabilitation of Block B of Nariva Swamp.

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