26th Meeting of the Ramsar Standing Committee -- Agenda papers

02/11/2001
26th Meeting of the Ramsar Standing Committee
Gland, Switzerland, 3 - 7 December 2001
Agenda item 14.6

DOC. SC26-15

Proposed budget for the triennium 2003-2005 for recommendation to COP8

Action requested:

a) The Standing Committee is requested to consider the advice from the Subgroup on Finance, and possibly from the Subgroup on COP8, on this matter. The Standing Committee may wish to consider whether to take a decision on this issue already at the 26th Meeting or to refer the matter to the Subgroup on COP8 at its proposed meeting on 6-8 May 2002, in order to allow further consultations with Contracting Parties.

b) The Standing Committee is invited to take a decision on the invoicing of contributions for fiscal year 2003, since the budget for this year will be adopted by the COP in late November 2002.

1. Article 6 of the Convention establishes, inter alia, that:

"5. The Conference of the Contracting Parties shall establish and keep under review the financial regulations of this Convention. At each of its ordinary meetings, it shall adopt the budget for the next financial period by a two-thirds majority of Contracting Parties present and voting.

6. Each Contracting Party shall contribute to the budget according to a scale of contributions adopted by unanimity of the Contracting Parties present and voting at a meeting of the ordinary Conference of the Contracting Parties."

2. Financial regulations were adopted at COP5 (Resolution V.2, attached for reference). They were revalidated by COP6 and COP7 and could be revalidated again by COP8.

3. The Standing Committee should propose a budget for the next triennium, which should be circulated at least three months in advance of the COP, as indicated by the Rules of Procedure.

4. The Secretary General has prepared two budget proposals, as follows:

a) a "minimum budget" which will allow the maintenance of the present level of staffing at the Ramsar Bureau, with the current level of operations. It is based upon the 2002 budget (submitted for adoption by the Standing Committee in document DOC.SC26-14), adjusted for inflation in Switzerland at 2% (current level of inflation is 1.8%), plus a 3% increase in the salaries budget line to allow for performance-related salary increases. This "minimum budget" has no annotation because in essence it is the current budget, with the adjustments indicated in the previous sentence.

b) an "ideal budget" containing a number of increases in the budget that in the opinion of the Secretary General would allow the Convention to operate more effectively. This "ideal budget" will also reduce the current pressure felt by Bureau staff:

i) it would allow the Bureau to deploy additional staff to undertake a task that in the past six years has at least doubled in demands and expectations; and

ii) would discharge the Bureau from the time-consuming and increasingly difficult task of having to raise funds to cover the cost of activities directly related to the governance of the Convention, such as the regional meetings between COPs and the support for delegates to attend the COP. The proposed increases are explained in the annotations to this version of the budget.

5. The Secretary General submits this "ideal budget" to the consideration of the Standing Committee, with the hope that most, if not all, new items could be considered for recommendation to the COP. As indicated in the box on "Requested action", the Standing Committee may wish to defer the final decision on the budget to be proposed to the COP to the meeting of the Subgroup on COP8 planned for 6-8 May 2002. It should also be noted that the draft Agenda and Programme for COP8 contains a proposal to establish a Committee on Finances and Budget on the first day of the COP to facilitate discussions on this matter and propose a decision to the COP.

6. Concerning the invoices of contributions for fiscal year 2003, the budget for this year would be adopted by the COP only in late November 2002, which is too late to send out invoices, since this would mean late payments and the risk of creating a cash flow problem for the Bureau.

7. Consequently, the Bureau requests the authorization of the Standing Committee to send out the invoices for the 2003 contributions in May 2002, based upon the 2002 budget but using the UN scale applicable to 2003. After the approval of the 2003 budget by COP8, if the difference to be paid by a Contracting Party is more than 10% (upwards or downwards) with respect to the invoiced amount, a revised invoice would be issued in January 2003. If the difference is less than 10%, the adjustment would be made in the invoice corresponding to the 2004 contributions, which should be sent out in May 2003.


Annex 1

Terms of reference for the financial administration of the Convention (Resolution 5.2 annex)

RES. C.5.2
  Annex 3

TERMS OF REFERENCE FOR THE FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION OF THE CONVENTION ON WETLANDS OF INTERNATIONAL IMPORTANCE ESPECIALLY AS WATERFOWL HABITAT

1. A separate account has been established by the Director General of IUCN on behalf of the Bureau of the Convention to administer the finances of the Convention. The Secretary General is responsible for the administration of Convention funds with all expenditure from this account requiring his approval or that of his designee.

2. The financial period shall be for three calendar years beginning 1 January 1994 and ending 31 December 1996. The appropriations of the account for the financial period shall be financed from:

(a) the contributions made by the Contracting Parties by reference to the table in Annex 2, including contributions from any new Contracting Parties which are to be added to this table;

(b) subject to the approval of the Standing Committee, contributions from States not Party to the Convention, other governmental, intergovernmental, and non-governmental organizations and other sources; and

(c) any uncommitted and unexpended appropriations from the financial period 1991-93.

3. The budget estimates, prepared in the currency of the country in which the seat of the Bureau is located, covering the income and expenditure of each of the three calendar years constituting the financial period to which they relate, shall be submitted to each ordinary Meeting of the Conference of the Contracting Parties to the Convention.

4. The estimates of each of the calendar years covered by the financial period shall be divided into sections; shall be specified according to budget lines; shall include references to the programmes of work to which they relate; and shall be accompanied by such information as may be required by, or on behalf of, the contributors, and such further information as the Standing Committee may deem useful and advisable.

5. The proposed budget shall be dispatched by the Bureau to all Contracting Parties at least 90 days before the date fixed for the opening of the ordinary Meeting of the Conference of the Contracting Parties.

6. The budget shall be adopted by a two-thirds majority of the Contracting Parties present and voting at the ordinary Meeting, pursuant to the terms of Article 6, paragraph 5 of the Convention, as amended by the Extraordinary Conference of the Contracting Parties held at Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada from 28 May to 3 June 1987.

7. In the event that the Secretary General anticipates that there will be a shortfall in resources over any calendar year as a whole, he shall seek the approval of the Standing Committee as to its priorities for expenditure.

8. After seeking the approval of the Standing Committee, the Secretary General shall be empowered to make transfers from one budget line to another. At the end of the first and the second calendar years of a financial period, the Secretary General may proceed to transfer any uncommitted/unexpended balance of appropriations to the next calendar year, provided that the total budget approved by the Conference of the Contracting Parties shall not be exceeded unless this is specifically sanctioned in writing by the Standing Committee.

9. All contributions shall be paid in convertible currencies. Contributions from States which become Contracting Parties after the beginning of the financial period should be made on a pro-rata basis for the balance of the year.

10. As soon as practicable at the end of each calendar year of a financial period, the Secretary General shall submit the audited accounts for the year. He shall also submit, as soon as practicable, the audited accounts for the financial period.

11. These Terms of Reference shall be effective for the financial period of 1 January 1994 to 31 December 1996.


Annex 2

Minimum core budget 2003-2005

adjusted for inflation (2%) and performance related salary increases (3%)

(in Swiss francs [000]) 2002 2003 2004 2005
1 Staff Costs
a) Salaries and social charges 2079 2183 2292 2407
b) Project funded position 112 118 124 126
c) Other employment benefits 191 195 199 203
d) Staff hiring and departure costs 10 12 13 15
2 Scientific and Technical Services
a) Ramsar Database 140 (1) 143 (2) 146 (3) 149 (4)
b) Ramsar Advisory Missions 0 0 0 0
3 Travel on Official Business 104 106 108 110
4 Purchase/Maintenance of Equipment/
Office Supplies (including depreciation) 21 22 23 24
5 Administrative Services & Operating Costs
a) IUCN services: computer/finance/
occupancy/personnel administration 444 452 460 468
b) Operating Costs: fax/telephone/photocopy/ clerical help/hospitality/bank charges, etc 129 132 135 137
6 Communications and Reporting
a) Publications/translation/mailing 151 154 157 160
b) Newsletter 21 22 23 24
7 Subsidiary Bodies
a) Standing Committee delegate support 42 43 44 45
b) STRP members’ support 42 43 44 45
c) Regional representatives’ support 10 20 25 30
d) Standing Committee chair fund 0 0 0 0
8 Conference of the Parties
a) Cost of COP incurred by the Bureau 0 0 0 0
b) COP delegate support 0 0 0 0
9 Miscellaneous
a) Bad debt provision 20 20 20 20
b) Exchange loss 10 0 0 0
Total Core Budget 3526 3665 3812 3963
Wetlands International provides co-financing
(1) for the year 2002 of: CHF 51,300

Annex 3

Income, Minimum core budget 2003-2005

MINIMUM CORE BUDGET 2003-2005
INCOME
(costs in Swiss francs [000])
2002 2003 2004 2005
1 Estimated contributions from Parties 2520 2493 2597 2704
2 Voluntary contributions - USA 697 703 732 762
3 Swiss income tax rebate (non-Swiss staff) 200 204 208 212
4 Interest 120 125 130 135
5 Administration fee from projects 134 140 145 150
Total Core Budget 3671 3665 3812 3963

 Annex 4

Annual contributions for the year 2003 using the UN scale and the "minimum budget"

2003 2003 2003
MEMBER STATE UN Ramsar
% % CHF
1310-00
091 Albania 0.00300 0.00302 1,000
001 Algeria 0.07000 0.07043 2,251
003 Argentina 1.14900 1.15608 36,948
002 Armenia 0.00200 0.00201 1,000
004 Australia 1.62700 1.63703 52,320
005 Austria 0.94700 0.95284 30,453
124 Azerbaijan 0.00400 0.00402 1,000
099 Bahamas 0.01200 0.01207 1,000
102 Bahrain 0.01800 0.01811 1,000
006 Bangladesh 0.01000 0.01006 1,000
116 Belarus 0.01900 0.01912 1,000
007 Belgium 1.12900 1.13596 36,305
108 Belize 0.00100 0.00101 1,000
118 Benin 0.00200 0.00201 1,000
008 Boliivia 0.00800 0.00805 1,000
096 Botswana 0.01000 0.01006 1,000
009 Brazil 2.39000 2.40474 76,855
010 Bulgaria 0.01300 0.01308 1,000
011 Burkina Faso 0.00200 0.00201 1,000
115 Cambodia 0.00200 0.00201 1,000
012 Canada 2.55800 2.57377 82,258
072 Chad 0.00100 0.00101 1,000
013 Chile 0.21200 0.21331 6,817
014 China 1.53200 1.54145 49,265
112 Colombia 0.20100 0.20224 6,464
084 Comoros 0.00100 0.00101 1,000
109 Congo 0.00100 0.00101 1,000
015 Costa Rica 0.02000 0.02012 1,000
093 Cote d’Ivoire 0.00900 0.00906 1,000
016 Croatia 0.03900 0.03924 1,254
123 Cuba 0.03000 0.03018 1,000
126 Cyprus 0.03800 0.03823 1,222
017 Czech Republic 0.20300 0.20425 6,528
092 Dem.Rep. Congo 0.00400 0.00402 1,000
018 Denmark 0.74900 0.75362 24,086
019 Ecuador 0.02500 0.02515 1,000
020 Egypt 0.08100 0.08150 2,605
113 El Salvador 0.01800 0.01811 1,000
022 Estonia 0.01000 0.01006 1,000
023 Finland 0.52200 0.52522 16,786
024 France 6.46600 6.50587 207,928
025 Gabon 0.01400 0.01409 1,000
094 Gambia 0.00100 0.00101 1,000
105 Georgia 0.00500 0.00503 1,000
026 Germany 9.76900 9.82924 314,142
027 Ghana 0.00500 0.00503 1,000
028 Greece 0.53900 0.54232 17,333
029 Guatemala 0.02700 0.02717 1,000
030 Guinea 0.00300 0.00302 1,000
031 Guinea-Bissau 0.00100 0.00101 1,000
032 Honduras 0.00500 0.00503 1,000
033 Hungary 0.12000 0.12074 3,859
034 Iceland 0.03300 0.03320 1,000
035 India 0.34100 0.34310 10,966
036 Indonesia 0.20000 0.20123 6,431
038 Iran, Islamic Rep.of 0.27200 0.27368 8,747
037 Ireland 0.29400 0.29581 9,454
098 Israel 0.41500 0.41756 13,345
039 Italy 5.06475 5.09598 162,867
103 Jamaica 0.00400 0.00402 1,000
040 Japan 19.51575 19.63608 627,569
041 Jordan 0.00800 0.00805 1,000
042 Kenya 0.00800 0.00805 1,000
087 Latvia 0.01000 0.01006 1,000
114 Lebanon 0.01200 0.01207 1,000
119 Libyan Arab Jamahiriya 0.06700 0.06741 2,155
043 Liechtenstein 0.00600 0.00604 1,000
044 Lithuania 0.01700 0.01710 1,000
045 Luxembourg 0.08000 0.08049 2,573
111 Madagascar 0.00300 0.00302 1,000
097 Malawi 0.00200 0.00201 1,000
085 Malaysia 0.23500 0.23645 7,557
046 Mali 0.00200 0.00201 1,000
047 Malta 0.01500 0.01509 1,000
049 Mauritania 0.00100 0.00101 1,000
125 Mauritius 0.01100 0.01107 1,000
050 Mexico 1.08600 1.09270 34,923
104 Monaco 0.00400 0.00402 1,000
106 Mongolia 0.00100 0.00101 1,000
048 Morocco 0.04400 0.04427 1,415
090 Namibia 0.00700 0.00704 1,000
051 Nepal 0.00400 0.00402 1,000
052 Netherlands 1.73800 1.74872 55,889
053 New Zealand 0.24100 0.24249 7,750
101 Nicaragua 0.00100 0.00101 1,000
054 Niger 0.00100 0.00101 1,000
122 Nigeria 0.06800 0.06842 2,187
055 Norway 0.64600 0.64998 20,773
057 Pakistan 0.06100 0.06138 1,962
056 Panama 0.01800 0.01811 1,000
058 Papua New Guinea 0.00600 0.00604 1,000
089 Paraguay 0.01600 0.01610 1,000
059 Peru 0.11800 0.11873 3,795
060 Philippines 0.10000 0.10062 3,216
061 Poland 0.37800 0.38033 12,155
062 Portugal 0.46200 0.46485 14,857
100 Republic of Korea 1.85100 1.86241 59,523
121 Republic of Moldova 0.00200 0.00201 1,000
063 Romania 0.05800 0.05836 1,865
064 Russian Federation 1.20000 1.20740 38,588
065 Senegal 0.00500 0.00503 1,000
117 Sierra Leone 0.00100 0.00101 1,000
066 Slovak Republic 0.04300 0.04327 1,383
067 Slovenia 0.08100 0.08150 2,605
068 South Africa 0.40800 0.41052 13,120
021 Spain 2.51875 2.53428 80,996
069 Sri Lanka 0.01600 0.01610 1,000
070 Suriname 0.00200 0.00201 1,000
071 Sweden 1.02675 1.03308 33,017
083 Switzerland 1.27400 1.28186 40,968
107 Syrian Arab Republic 0.08000 0.08049 2,573
127 Tajikistan 0.00100 0.00101 1,000
110 Thailand 0.29400 0.29581 9,454
086 The FYR of Macedonia 0.00600 0.00604 1,000
088 Togo 0.00100 0.00101 1,000
073 Trinidad & Tobago 0.01600 0.01610 1,000
074 Tunisia 0.03000 0.03018 1,000
075 Turkey 0.44000 0.44271 14,149
076 Uganda 0.00500 0.00503 1,000
095 Ukraine 0.05300 0.05333 1,704
077 United Kingdom 5.53600 5.57013 178,022
United Rep of Tanzania 0.00400 0.00402 1,000
200 USA (1) 0.00000 0.00000 -
078 Uruguay 0.08000 0.08049 2,573
079 Venezuela 0.20800 0.20928 6,689
080 Viet Nam 0.01600 0.01610 1,000
081 Yugoslavia 0.02000 0.02012 1,000
082 Zambia 0.00200 0.00201 1,000
TOTALS 77.52200 78.00000 2,543,489
Totals
Budget
(1) Other Contributions 22.00000 22.00000 703,120
TOTAL 99.52200 100.00000 3,246,609
Based on proposed 2003 budget figure of
3,196,000

Annex 5

IDEAL CORE BUDGET 2003-2005
(Additional items in bold letters and figures)
(in Swiss francs [000])
2002 2003 2004 2005
1 Staff Costs 0 0
a) Salaries and social charges 2079 2183 2292 2407
b) Project funded position 112 118 124 126
c) Other employment benefits 191 195 199 203
d) Staff hiring and departure costs 10 12 13 15
NEW STAFF POSITIONS
1. MedWet Coordinator (based in Athens) 150 157 164
2. Fresh Water/STRP Support Officer 200 210 220
3. Communications Officer 200 210 220
2 Scientific and Technical Services
a) Ramsar Database 140 143 146 149
Addition to cover real cost of Database 112 114 116
b) Ramsar Advisory Missions 0 30 31 31
3 Travel on Official Business 104 106 108 110
Additional travel costs new staff members 10 11 12
4 Purchase/Maintenance of Equipment/
Office Supplies (including depreciation) 21 22 23 24
Additional costs due to two new staff 2 3 4
5 Administrative Services & Operating Costs
a) IUCN services: computer/finance/
occupancy/personnel administration 444 452 460 468
Additional cost due to two new staff 50 51 52
b) Operating Costs: fax/telephone/photocopy/ 129 132 135 137
clerical help/hospitality/bank charges, etc.
Additional cost due to two new staff 6 7 8
6 Communications and Reporting
a) Publications/translation/mailing 151 154 157 160
b) Newsletter 21 22 23 24
7 Subsidiary Bodies
a) Standing Committee delegate support 42 43 44 45
b) Standing Committee chair fund 0 10 11 12
c) Regional representatives’ support 10 20 25 30
d) STRP members’ and STRP Chair’s support 42 50 52 54
e) Consultants to support STRP work 0 40 50 10
8 Conference of the Parties
a) Cost of COP incurred by the Bureau 0 270 270 270
b) COP delegates’ support 0 330 330 330
c) Pre-COP Regional Meetings 0 300 300 300
9 Miscellaneous
a) Bad debt provision 20 20 20 20
b) Exchange loss 10 0 0 0
Total Core Budget 3526 5382 5575 5722

Annex 6

MINIMUM CORE BUDGET 2003-2005
INCOME ideal
(costs in Swiss francs [000])
2002 2003 2004 2005
1 Estimated contributions from Parties 2520 3792 3916 4003
2 Voluntary contributions - USA 697 1070 1104 1129
3 Swiss income tax rebate (non-Swiss staff) 200 220 230 240
4 Interest 120 160 180 200
5 Administration fee from projects 134 140 145 150
Total Core Budget 3671 5382 5575 5722

Annex 7

Annual contributions for the year 2003-ideal budget

2003 2003 2003
MEMBER STATE UN Ramsar
% % CHF
1310-00
091 Albania 0.00300 0.00302 1,000
001 Algeria 0.07000 0.07043 3,424
003 Argentina 1.14900 1.15608 56,209
002 Armenia 0.00200 0.00201 1,000
004 Australia 1.62700 1.63703 79,592
005 Austria 0.94700 0.95284 46,327
124 Azerbaijan 0.00400 0.00402 1,000
099 Bahamas 0.01200 0.01207 1,000
102 Bahrain 0.01800 0.01811 1,000
006 Bangladesh 0.01000 0.01006 1,000
116 Belarus 0.01900 0.01912 1,000
007 Belgium 1.12900 1.13596 55,230
108 Belize 0.00100 0.00101 1,000
118 Benin 0.00200 0.00201 1,000
008 Boliivia 0.00800 0.00805 1,000
096 Botswana 0.01000 0.01006 1,000
009 Brazil 2.39000 2.40474 116,918
010 Bulgaria 0.01300 0.01308 1,000
011 Burkina Faso 0.00200 0.00201 1,000
115 Cambodia 0.00200 0.00201 1,000
012 Canada 2.55800 2.57377 125,137
072 Chad 0.00100 0.00101 1,000
013 Chile 0.21200 0.21331 10,371
014 China 1.53200 1.54145 74,945
112 Colombia 0.20100 0.20224 9,833
084 Comoros 0.00100 0.00101 1,000
109 Congo 0.00100 0.00101 1,000
015 Costa Rica 0.02000 0.02012 1,000
093 Cote d’Ivoire 0.00900 0.00906 1,000
016 Croatia 0.03900 0.03924 1,908
123 Cuba 0.03000 0.03018 1,000
126 Cyprus 0.03800 0.03823 1,859
017 Czech Republic 0.20300 0.20425 9,931
092 Dem.Rep. Congo 0.00400 0.00402 1,000
018 Denmark 0.74900 0.75362 36,641
019 Ecuador 0.02500 0.02515 1,000
020 Egypt 0.08100 0.08150 3,963
113 El Salvador 0.01800 0.01811 1,000
022 Estonia 0.01000 0.01006 1,000
023 Finland 0.52200 0.52522 25,536
024 France 6.46600 6.50587 316,315
025 Gabon 0.01400 0.01409 1,000
094 Gambia 0.00100 0.00101 1,000
105 Georgia 0.00500 0.00503 1,000
026 Germany 9.76900 9.82924 477,897
027 Ghana 0.00500 0.00503 1,000
028 Greece 0.53900 0.54232 26,368
029 Guatemala 0.02700 0.02717 1,000
030 Guinea 0.00300 0.00302 1,000
031 Guinea-Bissau 0.00100 0.00101 1,000
032 Honduras 0.00500 0.00503 1,000
033 Hungary 0.12000 0.12074 5,870
034 Iceland 0.03300 0.03320 1,000
035 India 0.34100 0.34310 16,682
036 Indonesia 0.20000 0.20123 9,784
038 Iran, Islamic Rep.of 0.27200 0.27368 13,306
037 Ireland 0.29400 0.29581 14,382
098 Israel 0.41500 0.41756 20,302
039 Italy 5.06475 5.09598 247,767
103 Jamaica 0.00400 0.00402 1,000
040 Japan 19.51575 19.63608 954,706
041 Jordan 0.00800 0.00805 1,000
042 Kenya 0.00800 0.00805 1,000
087 Latvia 0.01000 0.01006 1,000
114 Lebanon 0.01200 0.01207 1,000
119 Libyan Arab Jamahiriya 0.06700 0.06741 3,278
043 Liechtenstein 0.00600 0.00604 1,000
044 Lithuania 0.01700 0.01710 1,000
045 Luxembourg 0.08000 0.08049 3,914
111 Madagascar 0.00300 0.00302 1,000
097 Malawi 0.00200 0.00201 1,000
085 Malaysia 0.23500 0.23645 11,496
046 Mali 0.00200 0.00201 1,000
047 Malta 0.01500 0.01509 1,000
049 Mauritania 0.00100 0.00101 1,000
125 Mauritius 0.01100 0.01107 1,000
050 Mexico 1.08600 1.09270 53,127
104 Monaco 0.00400 0.00402 1,000
106 Mongolia 0.00100 0.00101 1,000
048 Morocco 0.04400 0.04427 2,152
090 Namibia 0.00700 0.00704 1,000
051 Nepal 0.00400 0.00402 1,000
052 Netherlands 1.73800 1.74872 85,023
053 New Zealand 0.24100 0.24249 11,790
101 Nicaragua 0.00100 0.00101 1,000
054 Niger 0.00100 0.00101 1,000
122 Nigeria 0.06800 0.06842 3,327
055 Norway 0.64600 0.64998 31,602
057 Pakistan 0.06100 0.06138 2,984
056 Panama 0.01800 0.01811 1,000
058 Papua New Guinea 0.00600 0.00604 1,000
089 Paraguay 0.01600 0.01610 1,000
059 Peru 0.11800 0.11873 5,773
060 Philippines 0.10000 0.10062 4,892
061 Poland 0.37800 0.38033 18,492
062 Portugal 0.46200 0.46485 22,601
100 Republic of Korea 1.85100 1.86241 90,551
121 Republic of Moldova 0.00200 0.00201 1,000
063 Romania 0.05800 0.05836 2,837
064 Russian Federation 1.20000 1.20740 58,704
065 Senegal 0.00500 0.00503 1,000
117 Sierra Leone 0.00100 0.00101 1,000
066 Slovak Republic 0.04300 0.04327 2,104
067 Slovenia 0.08100 0.08150 3,963
068 South Africa 0.40800 0.41052 19,959
021 Spain 2.51875 2.53428 123,217
069 Sri Lanka 0.01600 0.01610 1,000
070 Suriname 0.00200 0.00201 1,000
071 Sweden 1.02675 1.03308 50,228
083 Switzerland 1.27400 1.28186 62,324
107 Syrian Arab Republic 0.08000 0.08049 3,914
127 Tajikistan 0.00100 0.00101 1,000
110 Thailand 0.29400 0.29581 14,382
086 The FYR of Macedonia 0.00600 0.00604 1,000
088 Togo 0.00100 0.00101 1,000
073 Trinidad & Tobago 0.01600 0.01610 1,000
074 Tunisia 0.03000 0.03018 1,000
075 Turkey 0.44000 0.44271 21,525
076 Uganda 0.00500 0.00503 1,000
095 Ukraine 0.05300 0.05333 2,593
077 United Kingdom 5.53600 5.57013 270,820
United Rep of Tanzania 0.00400 0.00402 1,000
200 USA (1) 0.00000 0.00000 -
078 Uruguay 0.08000 0.08049 3,914
079 Venezuela 0.20800 0.20928 10,175
080 Viet Nam 0.01600 0.01610 1,000
081 Yugoslavia 0.02000 0.02012 1,000
082 Zambia 0.00200 0.00201 1,000
TOTALS 77.52200 78.00000 3,832,861
Totals
Budget
(1) Other Contributions 22.00000 22.00000 1,069,640
TOTAL 99.52200 100.00000 4,902,501
Based on the proposed 2003 budget of 4,862,000

Annex 8

Notes to the proposed "ideal budget"

(The current staff chart is attached for information at the end of these Notes.)

Budget line 1 - Staff costs

1. New staff position: MedWet Coordinator

1.1 Resolution VII.22 of COP7, on the Collaborative structure for Mediterranean wetlands, inter alia,

"2. EXPRESSES ITS SATISFACTION at the work carried out so far under the Mediterranean Wetland Initiative and ITS APPRECIATION to the governments and institutions, in particular the European Commission, that have provided financial support to the Initiative; and RECOGNISES it as a model of regional collaboration, based on endogenous efforts and a wide participation of all sectors;

3. APPROVES the establishment of the Mediterranean Wetlands Committee (MedWet/Com) within the framework of the Convention, as a forum for collaboration on wetland issues in the Mediterranean and as an advisor to the Convention in this region;

8. ENDORSES the actions taken by the Secretary General of the Convention to establish and supervise a MedWet Team, consisting of a Coordinator and secretarial units, supported financially by voluntary contributions of governments and organizations in the region and elsewhere;"

1.2 During the period 1997-2000, the MedWet Coordinator post was funded by the MAVA Foundation. In 2000, the Standing Committee, took Decision SC25-31, which says, inter alia:

"The Standing Committee, having received the generous proposals submitted by Spain and most recently by Greece for hosting the Coordination of the Mediterranean Wetlands Initiative, including a pledge for financial contributions towards the salary of the MedWet Coordinator and other expenses:

a) accepted with pleasure the recommendation of the interested countries that the MedWet Coordination function should continue to be based in Athens, Greece, for the interim period until 31 December 2002, when the 8th Meeting of the Conference of the Contracting Parties will have taken a more permanent decision;

d) authorized the Secretary General to enter into an appropriate agreement with the Government of Greece concerning the MedWet Coordination office and its financing;"

1.3 A Memorandum of Understanding was signed with the Greek Government, and the MedWet Unit in Athens was formally established on 15 July 2001, with a Med Wet Coordinator working full time (Mr. Spyros Kouvelis, Greece) and a part-time Policy Advisor (Mr. Nejib Bennesaiah, Tunisia). Two other professionals seconded by the Greek Biotope and Wetland Centre (EKBY), with funding from the Greek Government, should join the Unit soon.

1.4 The Mediterranean Wetlands Committee held its 4th Meeting in Portugal in May 2001 and considered the question of the future funding of the MedWet Unit from 1 January 2003 onwards. In its Conclusions, MedWet/Com4 stated, inter alia:

"19. ACCEPTS the priorities proposed in the MedWet work plan 2001 to 2002 [DOC MC4/04], with the following additions and modifications [Agenda item 3.2]:

Institutional and administrative work

19.1 ESTABLISHES as the highest priority to ensure the future operation of the MedWet Coordination Unit. To reach this objective it was agreed that it is necessary to clarify, on a long-term basis, the mission, functioning, budget and financing of the MedWet Coordination Unit. In order to achieve this result, MedWet/Com REQUESTS the Ramsar Bureau to provide to all MedWet/Com members more detailed and documented information on its proposals concerning the long-term future and funding in support of the MedWet Initiative (including added value, structure and operation of the MedWet Coordination Unit and its relation to the Ramsar structure and analytical budget) by 30 June 2001; and INVITES members to provide comments by 30 September 2001; ALSO SUGGESTS that the proposal to be submitted to the Ramsar Standing Committee at its meeting on 3-7 December 2001 should include alternative solutions and eventually the addition of a percentage of the MedWet cost in the Ramsar core budget; FURTHER PROPOSES, in order to convince the Ramsar Standing Committee, to proceed to an assessment of the contribution of MedWet during the past decade and of its capability to offer its experience outside the Mediterranean, based on the fact that Resolution VII.22 of COP 7 recognised the importance of the MedWet Initiative and approved the establishment of the MedWet/Com, and considering as well that the MedWet structure and products can be used all over the world;"

1.5 As requested by MedWet/Com4, the Ramsar Bureau prepared a 25-page document entitled "The Mediterranean Wetlands Initiative: 1991-2001 and beyond", which was distributed to MedWet/Com member countries under cover of a diplomatic note dated 21 June 2001.

1.6 Concerning the financing of the MedWet Unit, the Bureau document contained the following elements:

"64. The cash contribution form the Greek Government for the interim period 2001-2000 amounts to Euro 160,000 per year. This contribution will pay the salaries of the MedWet Coordinatior and the Policy Advisor (on a part-time basis) and the operational costs of the Unit, including staff travel. In addition, the Greek Ministry is providing free of charge the necessary office facilities and the services of the two professional staff members seconded through EKBY.

65. For the year 2003 and beyond, the budget of the MedWet Initiative should cover the operation of the Coordination Unit and certain costs of MedWet/Com. The proposed budget is as follows (in Euros per year):

Staff costs
a) MedWet Coordinator 100,000
b) Two technical staff members 100,000
c) one administrative support staff 35,000
Travel 50,000
Office operating costs 30,000
Experts and consultants 40,000
Representatives support for MedWet/Com meetings 30,000

Euro per year 385,000

66. It is proposed that the MedWet/Com member hosting the MedWet Coordination Unit should cover the full costs of the two technical staff members and one administrative support staff member (including salaries and social charges). In addition the host country should provide fully furnished and equipped office facilities and cover office operating costs included in the above budget.

67. The members of the MedWet Technical Network will cover the needs of the Coordination Unit in technical support by providing appropriate experts as required, after mutual consultation, and on a voluntary basis. These requirements must be planned well in advance and included in the Work Plans of the Unit.

68. The MedWet/Com member hosting each of its meetings is expected to cover all the expenses required within the country, including the venue and simultaneous translation.

69. The costs detailed below should be covered through the Ramsar Bureau budget:

Staff costs: MedWet Coordinator 100,000
Travel 50,000
Experts and consultants 40,000
Representatives’ support for MedWet/Com meetings 30,000

TOTAL Euro 220,000

70. This increase in the Ramsar Bureau budget could be paid in different manners, for example:

Option A. The increase is fully paid by the Contracting Parties that are MedWet/Com members, on the basis of the application of the UN scale used to calculate the contributions to the Ramsar Bureau budget. In this case, the additional contribution of each MedWetCom member country will be as follows:

TABLE OF ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE CORE BUDGET OF THE RAMSAR CONVENTION

(using the UN scale of assessments)

Year 2003
MedWet/Com Member Coutries
Name of Country UN % Ramsar % Annual Contribution
EUROS
Albania 0.003 0.0182 40
Algeria 0.070 0.4237 932
Bosnia & Herzegovina 0.004 0.0242 53
Bulgaria 0.013 0.0787 173
Croatia 0.039 0.2361 519
Cyprus 0.038 0.2300 506
Egypt 0.081 0.4903 1,079
France 6.466 39.1381 86,104
Greece 0.539 3.2625 7,178
Israel 0.415 2.5120 5,526
Italy 5.065 30.6564 67,444
Jordan 0.008 0.0484 107
Lebanon 0.012 0.0726 160
Libyan Arab Jamahiriya 0.067 0.4055 892
Malta 0.015 0.0908 200
Monaco 0.004 0.0242 53
Morocco 0.044 0.2663 586
Portugal 0.462 2.7964 6,152
Slovenia 0.081 0.4903 1,079
Spain 2.519 15.2457 33,541
Syrian Arab Republic 0.080 0.4842 1,065
FRY Macedonia 0.006 0.0363 80
Tunisia 0.030 0.1816 399
Turkey 0.440 2.6633 5,859
Yugoslavia 0.020 0.1211 266
TOTALS 100 219,993
Budget for year 2003 Euros 220’000

NOTE: The total contribution to the Ramsar budget of all MedWet/Com member countries in 2002 will be Euro 350,231.

Option B. The salary of the MedWet Coordinator is added to the salary costs of the Ramsar Bureau as one more member of the Bureau staff. This will leave ? 120,000 to be apportioned among the MedWet/Com member countries. This could be done by using the UN scale as in option A or by establishing a MedWet Trust Fund, with agreed contributions by each MedWet/Com member, with a minimum contribution of, for example, ? 500.

Option C. The total cost of the MedWet Coordination Unit is added to the Ramsar budget. This will represent an increase of around 10.5% over the 2002 budget which amounts to ? 2,080,500.”

1.7 The feedback received from MedWet/Com member countries is that they would support the Option B suggested in the previous paragraph. Thus, the Secretary General invites the Standing Committee to consider this new staff position in the Ramsar Bureau covered by the core budget. In essence, it is a post similar to that of the Regional Coordinators, dealing with a significant - and very sensitive - cross section of three Ramsar regions: Asia, Africa and Europe. Thus, the MedWet Coordinator post should represent an important support to the work of the Regional Coordinators of these regions.

2. New staff position: Freshwater/STRP Support Officer

2.1 Since Ramsar COP6 in 1996, the Convention has become more and more active in water issues, based on the recognition that water quality and quantity constitutes a key issue to ensure the appropriate functioning of wetlands. This relatively new approach of the Convention requires technical expertise on this matter and active interaction with the large and varied water management community at the national and international level.

2.2 A few examples of the interactions of the Ramsar Bureau in this area include the working relations with the World Water Council and the Global Water Partnership, participation in the World Water Forum sessions (Morocco 1998, The Netherlands 2000 and Japan 2003) and in the World Water Conference (Germany 2001). For the first time in its 26 years of existence, the Subgroup on Water of the UN Administrative Committee on Coordination, which brings together all the UN agencies dealing with water issues, invited the Ramsar Bureau to attend its annual meeting in 2001.

2.3 In addition, the Bureau is increasingly being asked to provide inputs on questions related to the hydrology of wetlands in relation to projects and studies, and in a number of cases the issues affecting the ecological character of Ramsar sites are directly related to the management of the hydrological system to which they belong.

2.4 Thus, the Bureau feels that it is becoming imperative to be able to deploy the necessary staff expertise, and time, to deal with these issues.

2.5 On a related note, the establishment of a network of National Focal Points for the Scientific and Technical Review Panel (STRP) also requires considerable Bureau attention and work. This network has a great potential for the Convention, not only for making inputs in the development of the Ramsar tools but also for engaging the scientific community in each Contracting Party to support the effective implementation of the treaty.

2.6 The proposal is to combine in one staff position the role of freshwater technical officer and focal point for the STRP network of National Focal Points.

3. New staff position: Communications Officer

3.1 The Bureau has been placing a high priority on "communicating the message" by using strategically the very limited human and financial resources at its disposal. Contracting Parties are in a good position to judge the results of these efforts. From the Bureau perspective we feel that the results have been highly positive.

3.2 Nevertheless, these has been possible only due to the strong dedication of the limited staff assigned to this area of work: one full time and two part time posts. Of these two part-time posts, one is a contractual position that the Bureau has been able to maintain on board during the past two years by making use of some unexpected non-earmarked income and surpluses, such as the year-end gains in exchange rates.

3.3 The workload on the full-time post has increased significantly in recent years for two reasons - increasing number of Contracting Parties and Ramsar sites generates increased work in terms of the Web and e-mail exchange of information, and the higher profile of the Convention in recent years has generated much greater interaction between the Bureau and the many other institutions engaged in wetlands/environmental work as well as the general public. It is our success in raising the profile of the Convention that generates additional work!

3.4 In addition, the initiatives launched by the Bureau in responding to the mandates of Resolution VII.9 on the Convention’s Outreach Programme are generating high demands on the Bureau.

3.5 Consequently the Secretary General invites the Standing Committee to consider establishing this new staff position in the core budget.

Budget line 2 - Scientific and Technical Services

4. Addition to cover the real cost of the Ramsar Sites Database

4.1. The Ramsar Database of sites included in the List of Wetlands of International Importance (the Ramsar List) is maintained under contract with the Bureau by Wetlands International at its offices in Wageningen, the Netherlands.

4.2. The Ramsar Sites Database constitutes one of the most significant tools of the Convention. The estimates for the Ramsar Sites Database work in the next triennium to be undertaken by Wetlands International substantially exceed the budget contribution from the Convention for the current triennium, i.e. Swiss francs 140,000 in 2002. Thus, Wetlands International has been providing additional co-financing in order to maintain the Ramsar Sites Database work at an acceptable level of efficiency. This co-financing represents a cash contribution to complete the cost of personnel and operations, and does not reflect the value of the office space, computer hardware and software, and communications infrastructure provided to Wetlands International by the Government of the Netherlands, which represent an indirect contribution to the Convention.

4.3 The gap has also widened as a result of the rapid growth of the number of Contracting Parties and sites designated to the List: 92 Parties and 777 sites in the List at the time of COP6 in March 1996, 113 Parties and 956 sites at the time of COP7 in May 1999, and 129 Parties and 1104 sites at 25 October 2001.

4.4 Wetlands International has prepared an estimate showing that the cost of maintaining and further developing the Ramsar Sites Database and its associated services amounts to SFR 255,000 per year. The estimate of "real costs" reveals the true basic cost of the response to enquiries, database, directory and Web services which make up the Database costs.

4.5 The estimate is also important because the quality control of very variable input from Contracting Parties in relation to the Ramsar sites data, and response to diverse enquiries, is a vital part of the work and a considerable overhead. It is important also because it reveals part of the true extent of Wetlands International’s contribution to the work of the Convention over recent years, and provides a reality check about a major part of the service that the Convention provides to numerous enquirers and users of the Database services. Clearly it is a popular service, as recorded in the logbook of users that is regularly forwarded to the Bureau.

4.6 The Secretary General invites the Standing Committee to consider including in the core budget the full cost of maintaining and further developing the Ramsar Database and the associated Ramsar Database Services.

5. Ramsar Advisory Missions (RAMs)

5.1 One important service offered by the Convention to Contracting Parties is the mechanism of the Ramsar Advisory Missions (RAMs). They are sent at the request of a Contracting Party to provide advice on the problems faced by Ramsar sites, in particular those included in the record of Ramsar sites "where changes in ecological character have occurred, are occurring, or are likely to occur as a result of technological developments, pollution or other human interference" (the Montreux Record).

5.2 Activities in 2001 included:

a) at the request of the Greek Government, two Ramsar experts visited the Schinias wetlands in Greece, where some of the developments in preparation for the Olympic Games are taking place;

b) a RAM was sent to the Sumava Peatlands in the Czech Republic in June 2001 (outbreaks of bark beetle populations);

c) a RAM was sent to Llancanelo Ramsar site in Argentina (impacts of oil exploration and extraction);

d) the RC for Africa undertook a RAM to the Parc national de la Keran site in Togo in August 2001 (degradation of the ecological caharacter and threats to the future of the site);

e) a RAM to Chilika Lake, India, for removal of this site from the Montreux Record has been requested and is being organized;

f) a RAM was sent to Mühlenberger Loch Ramsar site in Germany (compensation issues due to site boundaries restriction in the "urgent national interest");

f) a RAM was sent to the Srebarna Ramsar site in Bulgaria, jointly with the World Heritage Centre and IUCN mission (possible removal of the site from the Montreux Record);

g) RAMs are planned for the Ouse Washes Ramsar site in the UK (spring flooding affecting the ecological character of the site); and the Doñana Ramsar site in Spain (progress with a multimillion dollar hydrological restoration project).

5.3 The total cost of these missions in 2001 will be approximately SFR 50,000. The funds have come so far from voluntary contributions, mainly from NGOs.

5.4 The RAMs are becoming more expensive to conduct due to the fact that in a number of cases the Bureau has to hire consultants with the specialized knowledge required to deal with the problems under review, an expertise that is not always available at the Bureau. In addition, it is possible that the voluntary contributions for this core function of the Bureau may cease in the future.

5.5 The Secretary General recommends to include a sum in the core budget to cover, at least partially, the costs of RAMs.

Budget line 7 - Subsidiary Bodies

6. Standing Committee Chair fund

6.1 The Standing Committee chair is required to undertake missions to represent the Convention on many occasions. The number of these occasions may augment in the next triennium if the process of harmonizing the work of environment-related conventions goes ahead. In addition, it is possible that the Chair of the Standing Committee in the next triennium will come from a developing country (the current Chair being from a developed country). Thus, the Secretary General recommends to allocate a sum to this budget line in the core budget.

7. Consultants to support STRP work

7.1 In the document dealing with the modus operandi of the Scientific and Technical Review Panel (STRP) in the next triennium (DOC.SC26/COP8-23), it is advised that the work of the STRP should be supported by external consultants. These will be experts in the particular areas in which the STRP has to develop new tools, with the STRP playing more a role of a "review panel", as originally intended, rather than a "tools development panel", as has been the case recently.

7.2 If this proposal is retained, it will be necessary to include a sum in the core budget to cover the costs of these consultants.

Budget line 8 - Conference of the Parties

8. Cost of COP incurred by the Bureau

8.1 The costs related to the organization of each session of the COP incurred by the Bureau includes (cost is Swiss francs):

a) Translation of documents before and during the COP, and translation of the proceedings; 250 000

b) Copying and distribution of official documents, and freight of additional copies and other documents to the COP venue 70 000

c) Consultants 70 000

d) Temporary support staff 30 000

e) Team of 12 interpreters and a coordinator during the COP 75 000

f) 40 return tickets (economy class) for Ramsar Bureau staff, interpreters and translators (cost depending on the location of the venue in relation to Geneva) 69 000

g) Perdiems: 40 persons x 12 days @ 200 SFR per day 96 000

h) COP proceedings in three languages (some 800 pp in each language) 150 000

TOTAL 810 000

8.2 So far, Ramsar has required that these costs are covered by the host country of the COP. As a consequence, it has not always been easy to find a host country, and of the eight meetings of the COP, including the next one, seven have taken place in developed countries and only one in a developing country (COP7 in Costa Rica).

8.3 While the only experience of holding the Conference in a developing country was very successful from the point of view of the results of the meeting, the difficulties in covering the Bureau’s costs related to COP7 were enormous and created an undue level of stress for the Bureau staff and for the organizers in the host country. Thus, as long as these costs are not included in the core budget of the Convention, the Secretary General will strongly advise developing countries against offering to host the COP, since they will find it extremely difficult to cover all the local costs and in addition transfer near one million Swiss francs to Switzerland!

8.4 Possibly without exception, the conventions include in their budgets the cost of holding the meetings of their Conferences of the Parties, a key feature in the governance of all treaties. The Secretary General invites the Standing Committee to terminate the Ramsar exception to that rule by accepting to include an allocation in the core budget during the three years of the triennium between COPs, with the allocations during the first two years being brought forward for use in the third year, when the COP should actually take place.

9. COP delegate support

9.1 One key requirement for the success of a meeting of the Conference of the Parties is the attendance of all Contracting Parties. Out of the current 129 Contracting Parties, more than 100 require assistance to attend the COP. To provide assistance for travel and subsistance for two delegates per country, it is necessary to have almost one million Swiss francs available. Most conventions have an allocation in their core budgets for this purpose. In the case of Ramsar, the Bureau has been required to go out to raise the necessary funds on the occasion of each meeting of the COP. This could be interpreted to indicate that for Contracting Parties the Ramsar Convention is a lesser treaty than the others, and/or that the Ramsar Bureau is being penalized by having the additional responsibility of ensuring, through its fundraising efforts, that Parties are present at the COP, a responsibility that in the other conventions falls to the Contracting Parties themselves, by providing the necessary means.

9.2 An allocation of SFR 300,000 per year during the triennium would permit the Convention to count upon the necessary resources to have all developing countries and countries in transition in attendance at the COP. Without their presence, the COP would become an irrelevant event.

10. Pre-COP Regional Meetings

10.1 Pre-COP regional meetings are seen as an integral part of the governance of the Convention, but holding them is very much dependent of the Bureau being able to raise the necessary funds. The arguments in favour of this addition to the core budget are very similar to the ones developed in the previous paragraphs, all of them related to the actual functioning and governance of an intergovernmental treaty.

10.2 Also in this case, the proposal is to spread the costs of the regional meetings over during the triennium, even though the actual expenditure will take place mostly in the third year.


Annex: Ramsar Bureau staff chart (Word)

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