The 10th Meeting of the Conference of the Contracting Parties (Ramsar, Iran, 1971)

13/08/2008


"Healthy Wetlands, Healthy People"
10th Meeting of the Conference of the Contracting Parties
to the Convention on Wetlands (Ramsar, Iran, 1971)
Changwon, Republic of Korea, 28 October - 4 November 2008
 

Ramsar COP10 DOC. 8
English and French only

Regional overview of the implementation of the Convention and its Strategic Plan 2003–2008 in Africa

The National Reports upon which this overview is based can be consulted at http://ramsar.org/cop10/cop10_natlrpts_index.htm.

1.    Contracting Parties in Africa (47): Algeria, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central Africa Republic, Cape Verde, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Cote d’Ivoire, Democratic Republic of Congo, Djibouti, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Libyan Arab Jamahiriya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Sudan, Togo, Tunisia, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, and Zambia.

2.    Contracting Parties whose National Reports are included in this analysis (39): Algeria, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Cote d’Ivoire, Democratic Republic of Congo, Djibouti, Egypt, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, Seychelles, South Africa, Sudan, Togo, Tunisia, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, and Zambia.

3.    The National Report from the Gambia was received after the deadline for their inclusion in the Ramsar NR Database for COP10 analyses. Therefore, information from this country has not been included in this report.

4.    Contracting Parties yet to submit National Reports (7): Burundi, Cape Verde, Equatorial, Guinea-Bissau, Libyan Arab Jamahiriya, Sao Tome and Principe, and Sierra Leone.

1.     Main achievements since COP9 and priorities for 2009-2012

1.1     Main achievements since COP8

5.    The triennium 2005-2008, when compared with the previous one, can be considered as a major step ahead for the Africa region if we consider the volume and the diversity of activities which have taken place in the Continent as far as the implementation of the Convention is concerned. We have had the accession of new Parties and the development of strategic partnerships with other institutions and groups that have an interest in the wise use of wetlands in the region. This led us to actions that are not only conservation-oriented but balancing the conservation and wise use of wetlands aspect of our mission. The achievements indicated in the National Reports (NRs) are the results of the collaboration between Contracting Parties (CPs), the Secretariat, the International Organization Partners (IOPs) and other partners. However, the National Reports analysis also reveals that significant effort has been made to carry out the objectives included in the draft 2009-2012 Strategic Plan. This triennium has paved the way for some major changes in the way we are dealing with the Convention’s implementation, as we are having more Parties in the region and these Parties are more and more demanding in terms of the assistance they wish to receive from the Secretariat. There is a new international environmental governance that is taking shape and the scarce resources that we have at the level of the Africa Unit of the Secretariat will definitely not allow us to meet the demands expressed by the CPs. This is one of the major challenges before us for the coming triennium.

6.     This past triennium has seen the development of more national wetland inventories, which constitute the basis for wetlands management and planning. It is important that CPs have embarked upon such a move as it has paved the way for a global trend that will bring a majority of CPs to the starting point that will allow them to assess and understand the magnitude and nature of their wetland problems before any action is proposed. Parties will be encouraged and supported in the preparation of their inventory reports during the next triennium.

7.     The preparation of National Wetland Policies (NWP), which is usually the next step after the national inventory is completed, has seen some significant progress in the region over the past three years. It was particularly encouraging to note that the new generation of NWPs, elaborated from 2005 to 2008, are not “stand alone” policy documents but are considered in related national policy instruments such as strategies for sustainable development, poverty eradication strategies, water resources management and water efficiency plans in many countries. This is a major achievement in the region as it will help in implementing Resolution IX.14 (2005) on poverty reduction and at the same time assist CPs to meet some of the Millenium Development Goals (MDGs) such as the one on poverty alleviation.
 
8.    The establishment of National Ramsar / Wetlands Committees (NRCs) (or equivalent body) has increased over the last triennium to reach the historic figure of 22 CPs with an NRC. Even though not all of them are very active, this can still be considered as an achievement, as it would easier to activate or reactivate a process which is already in place.

9.    Since COP9, there has been an increase in the designation of new Ramsar sites of international importance in the region. This is clear evidence of progress being made in the implementation of one of the three pillars of the Convention.
 
10.     The increase of newly designated sites coincided with the preparation of more and more management plans for Ramsar sites in the continent. The preparation and implementation of management plans for Ramsar sites is becoming common practice in African CPs. This is another sign of the dynamism of some Parties in implementing the Convention, as it is important that measures are taken to maintain the ecological character of sites once designated.

11.    Although only one regional initiative was developed in the region since COP9 (WacoWet for West Africa coastal wetlands), it is encouraging to see that almost all the other subregions but Southern Africa have developed their regional initiatives to be approved at COP10. If approved, we will have NigerWet and WacoWet for West Africa, MedWet for Northern Africa, CongoWet or WetCongo and ChadWet for Central Africa and RAMCEA, NileWet and the Lesser Flamingoes Regional Initiative for East Africa. This will give us quite a satisfactory coverage rate of the region in terms of regional initiatives developed.

12.    The celebration of World Wetlands Day (WWD) over the past three years has been quite successful when we look at the results and impacts indicated in the NRs in terms of public awareness on the role, functions and ecosystem benefits of wetlands on the continent. This is an achievement which must be replicated for the coming triennium.

13.     Wetland restoration/rehabilitation programmes or projects have been implemented in more than half of the African CPs. This must be seen as a major achievement as only 13% of CPs had implemented restoration projects during the previous triennium. This is a good sign as CPs are now moving beyond just designating sites for the Ramsar List to restoring those that are in poor condition.

14.    The Africa region has made significant progress over the past three years to increase its number of Parties to the Convention, in spite of the difficulties in communicating with the countries that have not yet joined. With support from the Swiss Grant for Africa and the collaboration of the IOPs and other partners, we have tried to secure the accessions on the basis of the five Africa subregions. This has led us to 100 % coverage for Central, West, Northern Africa and Indian Ocean Islands with the accession of Cameroon, Central Africa Republic, and Sao Tome and Principe. The current situation in terms of accession leaves us with only six countries (Angola, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Somalia, Swaziland and Zimbabwe) to secure universal membership of the Convention in Africa, 88% of African states are now party to Ramsar.

1.2     Priorities for 2009-2012

15.    While it has allowed us to review and monitor the implementation of the Convention in Africa, the review of COP10 National Reports (NRs) has also helped us to have a clear vision of the challenges to be addressed over the next triennium.

16.    The preparation of wetland inventories that go together with the elaboration of National Wetlands Policies remains a key element in the implementation of the Convention. As for the previous triennium, CPs will be urged to combine the preparation of their National Wetland Policy with analysis of the findings of the wetland inventories. The Secretariat and its partners will continue their support to help Parties simultaneously work on the preparation of these two important planning tools.

17.    The integration of wise use of wetlands into sustainable development and poverty reduction remains of paramount importance for African CPs, as wetlands cannot be considered as standalone resources that need to be protected without regard to the key question of development and their impacts on human being and livelihoods. The theme of this COP10 is an indication of the fact that the Convention will be looking more and more at the sustainable development and poverty reduction issues together with the wetland conservation problems. This major step ahead must be consolidated in African CPs; they need it more than the other regions as it is the only region in the world where poverty has been increasing over the last triennium. The new draft Resolution on wetlands and poverty reduction, which will supplement Resolution IX.14, should serve as a guideline to achieve this priority.

18.    Even though it is not really emphasized in the NRs, the impacts of extractive industries on wetlands will receive particular attention through the implementation of the draft COP10 Resolution on the topic (if approved). This will also be an opportunity for the Convention and CPs to develop strategic partnerships with the private sector involved in mining activities that have impacts on the wetlands in the region. In addition, the restoration and rehabilitation of degraded wetlands will also constitute a priority for the next triennium, depending on the availability of resources. CPs in collaboration with the Secretariat and its partners will draw up a list of important wetlands (Ramsar and non-Ramsar sites) that need immediate restoration and rehabilitation action. An action plan should be prepared and submitted to donors for funding. This will be linked with para. 16 above where the degraded wetlands are identified.

19.     The impacts of invasive species are a major cause of disturbance in the water cycle and the ecological character of wetlands in Africa. In spite of the progress made in the fight against invasive alien species in African wetlands, there is still a lot to be done as the problem has not yet been completely solved and represents a threat for wetlands in the region. At the last COP, it was suggested that the involvement of Ramsar in the fight against this phenomenon would be done through the NEPAD program area on invasive species. It is discouraging to notice that this program has not yielded the expected results. It is thus proposed that the Convention develop strategic partnerships with the river basin organizations to address this issue during the next triennium.
 
20.    During the last triennium, we have been able to create new National Ramsar Committees and reactivate some of those that were dormant. Unfortunately, many of them still remain dormant because of the inexistence of a proper work program and a lack of resources for their functioning. Our priority for the next triennium would be to have at least 75% of the Africa CPs with an operational NRC that will bring together all the interested actors such as representatives of IOPs in the country and the focal points of the biodiversity-related Multilateral Environment Agreements (MEAs) – Ramsar, CCD, CBD, CMS, CITES, AEWA, etc. Technical support will be provided to locally raise the required financial resources through development agencies and other partners.

21.    If we refer to the results shown in the analysis of the COP10 National Reports, it seems that the different attempts made to involve the private sector in the wise use of wetlands in Africa have started to yield some results. In order to keep the momentum gained over the last three years, it is important that the Secretariat and its partners reinforce their support to African CPs in obtaining tangible support from the private companies that do or do not use wetlands resources to make profits. As indicated above, emphasis will be put on the extractive industries and tourism companies.

22.     CEPA activities are recognized as vital for the Convention’s implementation in the region, and it is important that they are pursued and extended in a region such as Africa where the rate of illiteracy is still high. The efforts initiated by the Secretariat and the IOPs over the last triennium must be consolidated to see real progress at COP11. We believe that the modules that ATEN (France) and the Secretariat have prepared to assist the Convention National Focal Points (NFPs) in French-speaking countries will alleviate the magnitude of the problem related to poor results in implementing the Convention through CEPA activities. The priority for the next triennium will be delivering this training module to both French and English-speaking CPs so that the positive indicators of CEPA activities at national level will not only be the organization of World Wetlands Day.

23.    Between COP9 and COP10 there has been an increase in the number of CPs (23 against 13) that have a strategy for further designations of Ramsar sites. This shows that there will be more and more designations during the next triennium – while we cannot prevent CPs from designating new sites, we need to make sure that these new sites are designated with a proper management plan. The preparation and implementation of management plans for the maximum of Ramsar sites will then constitute a priority for the next triennium.

24.    We have been able to develop and consolidate our collaboration with institutions such as the Africa Development Bank, CMS and AEWA secretariats, the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP), the African Water Facility, the European Space Agency, among others, over the last triennium. This is far from enough if we want to engage with the key institutions that play an active role in the sustainable development of Africa. During the next triennium we will elaborate a strategy to engage in partnership with the UN Economic Commission for Africa, the World Tourism Organization, the United Nations Development Program, the Global Environment Facility and convention secretariats such as CCD, World Heritage and UNFCCC. It goes without saying that on the basis of the limitations in some IOPs’ support to our CPs, the next triennium will also be an opportunity to sit down with each of the IOPs and discuss a joint plan of action to assist CPs in the implementation of the Convention in the region.

25.    The Africa region is not far from universal membership in the Convention. The current situation in terms of accession leaves us with only six countries (Angola, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Somalia, Swaziland, and Zimbabwe) to secure universal membership of the Convention in Africa. During the next triennium, focus will be put on securing the accession of countries among such as Angola, Ethiopia, Swaziland and Zimbabwe which are quite advanced in their accession process.

26.    When asked whether they had any recommendations concerning implementation assistance from the Ramsar Secretariat, the majority of CPs indicated that they needed financial and technical support. It is obvious that with the current set-up of the Africa Unit, we will not be able to satisfy the 47 CPs. The priority for the coming triennium would then be to find alternative ways to assist CPs in raising funds for the implementation of the Convention at the national and regional level, and to develop more strategic partnerships for our CPs to have access to some funding mechanisms they could not access before. We will play a facilitating role and let the CPs do the implementation.

2.     Implementation activities undertaken since COP9

Goal 1: The Wise Use of Wetlands

National wetland inventories and assessment (Strategy 1.1)

27.    Even though wetland inventory has been recognized by the Convention as the key basis for strategy and policy development and for development of wetland management planning, it is unfortunate to see that only 9 CPs in the region have a comprehensive national wetlands inventory. This means that there has been little progress in terms of national wetland inventories completed, if we compare with COP9. However, it is also important to note here that 17 CPs (44%) have embarked in the preparation of their national wetland inventories which is a major step ahead as they were only 2 (10%) at COP9. The Secretariat, together with the IOPs and other partners must continue their support to CPs for the completion of these wetlands inventories by the next COP.


Figure 1: CPs with National Wetlands Inventories

28.    Along the same lines, it seems that there is an accessibility problem as national and partial wetland inventory data and information are maintained and made accessible to all stakeholders in only 8 CPs (21%), and 9 CPs clearly indicated that the inventory data and information are not made accessible to all stakeholders. Some efforts must be initiated to address this issue as it is pointless to collect the data and information and not make them available to those who have an interest in the wise use of wetlands.

29.    It is surprising that, in a region where wetlands are among the most threatened ecosystems, only eight Parties (21%) reported that they have information about the status and trends of the ecological character of wetlands (and Ramsar sites). This must be addressed as it is important to have a system that allows the wetlands manager and other stakeholders to monitor the status and trends of wetlands, which are a major indicator of the convention implementation. In addition, it is a barometer of the wetlands condition with regard to the role and functions that they play at the national level.

National Wetland Policy (or equivalent instrument) (Strategy 1.2)

30.    Out of the 39 African countries for which COP10 National Reports were available for analysis, only 10 (26%) indicated that they have in place a National Wetland Policy (NWP), but more (14 CPs, 36%) indicated that the preparation of the NWPs was “in progress”. However, this is encouraging if we compare it with the figures provided at COP9, where only five CPs indicated that they had in place a National Wetland Policy (NWP).


Figure 2: CPs with National Wetland Policies

31.     It is worth noting that among the CPs that reported that they had a NWP in place or “in progress” or “being planned”, 38% (15 CPs) indicated that these NWPs incorporated some WSSD targets or actions. This must be seen as a positive sign as it shows that NWPs are not only “stand alone” policies but also make provision for the economic and social pillars of sustainable development. This is corroborated by the fact that 22 CPs (56%) have wetlands issues being incorporated into national strategies for sustainable development (including National Poverty Reduction Plans). The number of CPs that do not incorporate wetlands into National Poverty Reduction Plans is just five (13%).

32.    Along the same lines, it is encouraging to note that 18 CPs (46%) had wise use wetland programmes and/or projects that contribute to poverty alleviation objectives and/or food and water security plans being implemented. This trend is confirmed by the fact that 8 (21%) and 3 CPs are respectively in “the process” and planning to do so. This is a good indication of the level of implementation of Resolution IX.14 on wetlands management and poverty reduction.

33.    It is very unfortunate to see that only in three CPs (8%) have the quantity and quality of water available to and required by wetlands been assessed when we know that this is a major health indicator for wetlands. However, this can be explained by the fact that the skills and equipment needed for such an exercise are not always available in the region and some CPs may not see it as a priority.

34.    Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA), which is a system of incorporating environmental considerations into policies, plans and programmes, is a key management tool when it comes to wetland issues that cross among various sectors. It is good and encouraging to see that more than half (51%) of the CPs that responded to the question related to SEA indicated that SEAs are applied when reviewing policies, programmes and plans that may impact upon wetlands.

Wetland ecosystem services (Strategy 1.3)

35.    Wetlands in general and Ramsar sites in particular provide several ecosystems benefits and services. An assessment of these services and benefits are always useful when it comes to making decisions on the preparation of a management plan, for instance. Against this background and in spite of the importance of the assessment, it is a cause for dissatisfaction to see that only five CPs (13%) have conducted an assessment of the ecosystem benefits and services provided by Ramsar sites.

36.    As three years ago, there is no noteworthy information about peatlands from the African National Reports. Only one CP (Tunisia) responded that action has been taken to implement at national level the Guidelines for Global Action on Peatlands (Resolution VIII.17). However, South Africa responded that it is supporting, through the Peat Working Group and related departments (Departments of Environmental Affairs and Tourism, of Agriculture, and of Water Affairs and Forestry), the wise use principles of the Coordinating Committee for Global Action on Peatlands. The Peat Working Group and related national departments, as well as provincial departments and conservation bodies, have supported initiatives such as the International Mire Conservation Group’s wise use project in Maputaland and the Identification and Mapping of Peatlands in Southern Africa (inventory and awareness raising). The South African National Biodiversity Institute’s Working for Wetlands programme works with peatland restoration, poverty alleviation, skills transfer and awareness raising.

37.    Although it has been increasingly recognized that culture plays an important role in wetland management in Africa, it is unfortunate that the guiding principles on cultural values (Resolutions VIII.19 and IX.21) have been used or applied in only 8 CPs and planned in only 3 others. However, when compared with COP9 results (2 CPs), there is a satisfactory feeling because 9 and 3 countries (23% and 8%) are respectively “partly doing it” or are planning to do so.

Ramsar’s water-related guidance (Strategy 1.4)

38.    In support of the increasingly comprehensive suite of guidance on matters concerning the inter-relationship between water and wetland ecosystems, chiefly in response to instructions in COP8 Resolutions VIII.1 and VIII.2, STRP’s Working Group 3 has prepared an “Integrated Framework for the Ramsar Convention’s water-related guidance”.

39.    That paper explains the role of the Convention in water-related matters in the context of wetlands and the global hydrological cycle, shows the interrelationships between the different aspects of the Convention’s water-related guidance, and identifies a number of gaps in this guidance on certain aspects of water and ecosystems; gaps which could be the subject of future work by the STRP. The framework is designed to assist Ramsar Administrative Authorities in engaging other sectors in the role of the Convention in relation to water issues.

40.    The review of African countries’ National Reports shows that 14 CPs (36%) have used/applied the Convention’s water-related guidance in decision-making related to water resource planning and management. This represents the highest number if we consider each region separately. In addition, we note with satisfaction that 12 CPs (31%) indicated that they are “partly” using/applying the Convention’s water-related guidance in decision-making related to water resource planning and management. Can we see this as an indication that African CPs have understood that water and wetlands have always been vital to the social and cultural environment in the region?

41.    Communication, Education and Public Awareness (CEPA), which usually plays a tremendous role in catchment/river basin planning and management, seems to become more and more used in the region as 14 CPs (36%) reported that they’ve used CEPA expertise and tools in river basin management, while 8 (21%) and 6 CPs (15%) have done it partly and are planning to do so respectively.

42.    In spite of our efforts, marine and coastal wetlands are still underrepresented in the list of Ramsar sites of international importance even though around three quarters of CPs in the region have access to the sea. This is reflected in the responses related to the utilization of the Convention’s guidance on wetlands and coastal zone management (Annex to Resolution VIII.4) in Integrated Coastal Zone Management (ICZM) planning and decision-making, where 11 only CPs (28%) responded positively while 10 CPs (26%) have not taken advantage of this tool for the management of their coastal and marine wetlands.

43.    Projected impacts of climate change on Africa: “by 2020 between 75 and 250 million people will be exposed to an increase of water stress due to climate change; agricultural production will be severely compromised by climate variability and change. The areas suitable for agriculture, the length of growing seasons and yield potential, particularly along the margins of semi-arid and arid areas are expected to decrease. In some countries yield from rain fed agriculture could be reduced by up to 50% by 2020; local food supplies will be negatively affected by decreasing fisheries resources in large lakes due to rising water temperatures, which may be exacerbated by continued over-fishing; mangroves and coral reefs will be further degraded, with additional consequences for fisheries and tourism; new studies confirm that Africa is one of the most vulnerable continents to climate variability and change because of multiple stresses and low adaptive capacity” (IPCC 2007, page 8). In spite of this very alarming situation, it is puzzling to see that only 2 CPs (5%) have assessed the implications for wetland conservation and wise use of national implementation of the Kyoto Protocol against 22 (CPs) 56% which answered “no” to this question. The Yaoundé declaration, which calls for more collaboration between the Ramsar and UNFCCC secretariats, should pave the way to addressing the strong correlations that exist between the wise use of wetlands and climate change.

Figure 3: Climate change vulnerability in Africa

Wetland restoration and rehabilitation (Strategy 1.5)

44.    Twenty three (59%) African CPs report having implemented some wetland restoration/rehabilitation programmes or projects, five (13%) CPs indicated that this was in progress, and three further CPs reported that they have partly implemented their restoration/rehabilitation programmes – an overall encouraging response of 72% of CPs answering positively. Only eleven CPs (28%) have responded negatively to this question. This is a good sign which must be acknowledged, as wetlands on the continent are among the most damaged. In addition, if we compare with COP9 results, this is a major improvement as we had only 9 CPs (45%) which answered yes to this question at that time. Along the same lines the Convention’s guidance on wetland restoration (Annex to Resolution VIII.16; Wise Use Handbook 15, 3rd edition) has been used/applied in designing and implementing wetland restoration/rehabilitation programmes or projects in 9 CPs (23%)?

Invasive alien species (Strategy 1.6)

45.    It is widely recognized that aquatic invasive species can and do cause significant damage to wetland ecosystems and loss of livelihoods in Africa. Although one-quarter of CPs (10 CPs – 26%) have indicated that they have developed national policy, strategy and management responses to threats from invasive species, with over half (64%) answering positively, more progress on this important issue might have been expected. That there is clear recognition of invasive species as a problem is further demonstrated by prevention, eradication and control of invasive alien species having been fully incorporated in national legislation, national wetland and biodiversity policies and other management responses action plans in 25 CPs (64%), a greater level of action than in other regions. Because the number of countries that have answered “no” to the question (14 CPs – 36%) is higher than those that have answered “yes” (10 CPs – 26%), this is likely to be a priority for the next triennium.

46.    Furthermore, not encouragingly, only 28% (11 CPs) of CPs reported that actions related to invasive species have been carried out in cooperation with the focal points of other conventions and international organizations/processes – a step back on the synergy that has existed between the Ramsar Focal Point and the other MEA focal points in the region on certain specific issues. Along the same lines, half of CPs (19 CPs) responded that they had not worked in cooperation with the focal points of other conventions and international organizations/processes. The region must put some effort so that the “yes” are more than the “no” for next COP.

Goal 2: Ramsar Sites or Wetlands of International Importance

Strategic Framework for Ramsar site designation (Strategy 2.1)

47.    When compared with COP9 results, one can see that there is an increase in the number of CPs (23 against 13) that have a strategy for further designations of Ramsar sites, and this is reflected in the number of new sites designated since COP9 (see annexe 1 A). This must be seen as an important achievement in the implementation of the Convention at regional level as the List of Wetlands of International Importance is an important pillar of the Convention’s implementation.

Updating information on Ramsar sites (Strategy 2.2)

48.    Updating information on Ramsar sites is mandatory according to the Conference of the Contracting Parties’ Resolutions. In addition, it is an excellent barometer of the changes that have occurred over the preceding six years in the site’s ecological character. Needless to say, the results obtained from the COP10 questionnaires are not really encouraging, as only 13 CPs (33%) answered “yes” against 19 CPs (49%) that answered “no” to whether all required updates of the Information Sheet on Ramsar Sites of International Importance had been submitted to the Ramsar Secretariat. A quick look at annex 2.B (General List of Sites that Require Updating) confirms this observation.

49.    Four African Ramsar sites from 3 Contracting Parties have been successfully updated in 2007: Botswana: Okavango Delta; Liberia: Lake Piso, Zambia: Bangaweulu Swamps and Busanga Swamps. Updates are presently being evaluated for 24 other sites (annex 2).

Maintaining the ecological character of the Ramsar sites (Strategy 2.3)

50.    Development and implementation of management plans at all Ramsar sites has been a central objective of the Convention’s Strategic Plan for many years now. In Africa, some progress (but not enough) has been made during the last triennium towards the target of 50% of all Ramsar sites benefiting from having management plans in place. This survey indicated that only 9 CPs (23%) have developed and implemented management plans at all sites and 17 CPs (43%) responded that they have developed and implemented management plans in some Ramsar sites. Eight CPs report that management plans are being prepared to be implemented next time around, while five CPs (13%) answered that they had no management plans whatsoever. Overall there appears to have been little progress since COP9 on development of management plans if we consider that there has to be a correlation between the number of Ramsar sites designated and the number of management plans developed. This is likely to be a priority for the region during the next triennium.


Figure 4: - Ramsar sites with Management Plans

Monitoring the conditions of Ramsar sites (Strategy 2.4)

51.    Article 3.2 of the Convention stipulates that “Each Contracting Party shall arrange to be informed at the earliest possible time if the ecological character of any wetland in its territory and included in the List has changed, is changing or is likely to change as the result of technological developments, pollution or other human interference. Information on such changes shall be passed without delay to the organization or government responsible for the continuing bureau duties specified in Article 8.” It is an important article as it is among the very rare “compliance-base” articles of the Convention and it serves as a true indicator in our fight to safeguard the wetlands of the world. It is good to see that 19 CPs (49 %) have arrangements in place for the Administrative Authority to be informed of changes or likely changes in the ecological character of Ramsar sites. Only 9 CPs (23%) have answered “no” and 12 (31%) are planning to do so.

52.    The monitoring of the conditions of Ramsar sites is particularly important for the region with the proliferation of extractive industries around and within Ramsar sites and other wetlands. This will be a priority for the next triennium.


Figure 5: Mechanisms on art 3.2

53.    Since the last COP, no Ramsar site has been added to the Montreux Record. Only the governments of Algeria, South Africa, Mauritania and Senegal have informed the Secretariat that actions had been taken to address the issues for which Ramsar sites had been listed on the Montreux Record. So far the African sites on the Montreux Record are the following:

Table 1: African Sites on the Montreux Record

 

Country

Site name

Des date

Montreux

Area

Comments

1

DR Congo

Parc national des Mangroves

18/01/96

11/04/00

66,000

 

2

Egypt

Lake Bardawil

09/09/88

04/07/90

59,500

 

3

Egypt

Lake Burullus

09/09/88

04/07/90

46,200

 

4

Mauritania

Parc national du Diawling

23/08/94

28/02/02

15,600

Request for removal sent 21/05/08

5

Senegal

Djoudj

11/07/77

16/06/93

16,000

Request for removal sent 21/05/08

6

Senegal

Bassin du Ndiael

11/07/77

04/07/90

10,000

 

7

South Africa

Blesbokspruit

02/10/86

06/05/96

1,858

 

8

South Africa

Orange River Mouth

28/06/91

26/09/95

2,000

 

9

Tunisia

Ichkeul

24/11/80

04/07/90

12,600

Request for removal 2007

10

Uganda

Lake George

04/03/88

04/07/90

15,000

 

54.    The Secretariat has been informed about ecological change occurring, or likely to occur because of planned developments, in the following Ramsar sites: i) Algeria: Réserve intégrale du Lac El Mellah, construction of a high way; ii) Republic of Congo: Lake Cayo and Lake Loufoualeba, potash mining; iii) Democratic Republic of Congo: Parc national des Virunga, adverse effects of war fighting; iv) Kenya: Tana River Delta, sugar plantation and Lake Natron, soda ash plant; v) Liberia: Lake Piso, diamond mining; vi) Mauritania: Chat Tboul, oil exploration; vii) Morocco: Embouchure de la Moulouya, construction of a mega-tourism project; viii) South Africa: Orange River Basin, oil drilling, and Langebaan for iron ore activities; ix) Sudan: Sudd marshlands, oil exploration; x) Tanzania: Lake Natron Basin soda ash plant and construction of ecological tourist hotel lodge; xi) Zambia: Bangweulu Swamps for over-fishing and inflated hunting on the species in the site, Bangweulu Swamps, introduction of alien species; and xii) Mozambique: Maromeu Complex, oil and gas exploration.

Managing shared Ramsar sites and hydrological basins (Strategy 2.5)

55.    More than half of the African CPs have transboundary/shared wetlands and more than half of the 39 CPs that have answered the questionnaire indicated that they have identified all their transboundary/shared wetland systems, while 5 CPs (13%) have partly done it and another 5 CPs (13%) are planning to do so. This gives us a total “positive” result of 77%, which is quite encouraging as it lays down the foundation for the implementation of one of the key pillars of the Convention, i.e: international cooperation. Further attention needs to be paid to this important aspect of international cooperation under the Convention.


Figure 6: Shared and transboundary wetlands identified

56.    Effective cooperative management for shared wetland systems is a must and has been promoted by various COPs’ decisions and recommendations. It is therefore not encouraging to see that only 8 CPs (21%) have put in place a proper cooperative management system for their shared wetlands, against 10 (26%) that have answered that they have not done it. Even though the global rate of “positive” answers (60%) is quite satisfactory, we believe that among the priorities for the next triennium must be the development of cooperative management systems for shared wetlands in the region.


Figure 7: Joint Management Mechanism in place for shared and transboundary wetlands

Regional Ramsar initiatives in Africa (Strategy 2.6)

57.    Only one regional initiative was developed in the region since COP9 (WacoWet for West Africa coastal wetlands), even though there is room for more. The MedWet initiative which includes all the six Northern Africa CPs is still active. It is encouraging to see that more than half of the Africa CPs (21 CPs – 54%) that have answered the questionnaire responded that they have been involved in the development of a regional initiative under the framework of the Convention. However, 15 among them (38%) gave a negative answer. The next triennium must provide the opportunity to develop and implement at least one regional initiative in each of the major basins in the region. Finally, it is worth noting that Central, East Africa, and the Nile Basin CPs have submitted several regional initiatives to be approved by COP10.

Goal 3: International Cooperation

Cooperate with other agencies and agreements (Strategy 3.1)

58.    In Resolutions IX.3 and IX.5 (2005), the Parties called for more coordination of national activities to implement different Multilateral Environment Agreements. This call seems to have been heard, as the survey shows that 56% (22) of the 39 CPs that answered the questionnaire have put in place mechanisms at the national level for collaboration between the Ramsar Administrative Authority and the focal points of the other Multilateral Environmental Conventions (MECs). However, the Secretariat will provide support to the 15 CPs (38%) that have not done so through the existing National Wetlands Committees which should include NFPs of other MEAs. This is an important point, as there is a new international environmental governance which is shaping up with MEAs working hand in hand, and the Ramsar Convention cannot continue to be a “standalone” convention and must engage as much possible with other MEAs.

59.    Despite the efforts and resources made available by the Convention and the expectations raised, it is of considerable concern that only 5 CPs (for COP9 there were 6) report that they have participated in the implementation of the wetland programme under NEPAD. This programme is supposed to be the master plan around which the management of the African wetlands would be articulated. It is not encouraging that 69% (27 CPs) indicate that they have not participated in the implementation of the NEPAD wetland component (some of these reported that this was because NEPAD issues are handled by another governmental department – but this indicates a need for much better cooperation between Ramsar Administrative Authorities and those departments). The working relationships between the AMCEN, Ramsar and NEPAD Secretariats should lead to the preparation of a strategy to promote the involvement of African CPs in the implementation of the NEPAD wetland component. We have so far been able to provide financial and technical assistance to some countries in the preparation of the national inventories or national wetlands policies which are some components of the NEPAD wetlands program. However, these countries have not been reported accordingly. The Secretariat will provide another indicator to measure the level of implementation of the NEPAD wetland program as this one does not reflect the progress made at the Secretariat and national level.

Goal 4: Implementation Capacity

Involvement of the private sector (Strategy 4.2)

60.    At COP 9, 42% of African CPs reported having incorporated the private sector, academia and specialized institutions into decision-making related to wetlands, although only three CPs had established a private-sector “Friends of Wetlands” forum or equivalent mechanism, and overall there appears to be less involvement of the private sector in wetlands management in the region now than was being reported in COP8 National Reports – the reasons for this were not clear. Three years later, 22 CPs (56%) indicate that they have encouraged the private sector to apply the wise use principle in activities and investments concerning wetlands; this is a major step ahead if we consider the number of CPs involved. If we consider the global “positive response” rate to this question (34 CPs – 87%), this places Africa on top of the six regions recognized by the Convention when it comes to engaging with the private sector for the wise use of wetlands. This achievement is acceptable and the Secretariat will provide support to the five CPs that have given a negative answer to this question, as it is important that CPs engage as much as they can with the private sector for the wise use of wetlands in the region.


Figure 8: Engagement with the private sector for the wise use of wetlands.

Communication, education, participation and awareness (Strategy 4.4)

61.    CEPA activities are recognized as vital for the Convention’s implementation in the region, and it is important that they are pursued and extended. However, from the COP9 National Report analysis it seemed that the Convention’s CEPA programme adopted first at COP7 (Resolution VII.9) and further developed by COP8 Resolution VIII.31 was only starting to receive attention in the Africa region, and there was a clear issue of needing to find better resources in most African CPs for CEPA implementation at the national level. From COP10 results, things do not seem to get any better as to the question: “Has a mechanism for planning and implementing wetland CEPA (National Ramsar/Wetland Committee or other mechanism) been established with both CEPA Government and NGO National Focal Point (NFP) involvement?”, for only 8 CPs (21%) answered “yes” against 12 CPs (31%) that gave a negative answer. This disappointment can be mitigated by the number of CPs (32 CPs – 82%) that have carried out World Wetlands Day activities over the last 3 years. Even though the sum of “planned” and “partly” gives an encouraging result of 18 CPs (46%), as do the national campaigns, programmes and projects that have been carried out to raise community awareness of the ecosystem benefits/services provided by wetlands in 19 CPs (49%), we have to recognize that the “battle” for better recognition of the role and functions of wetlands in the region is not yielding the expected results and that there is a need to go beyond the celebration once a year of the WWD. Finally, we believe that the modules that the Secretariat has prepared to assist the Convention NFPs in French-speaking countries will reduce the magnitude of the problem.


Figure 9: Public awareness on ecosystem benefits provided by wetlands

Figure 10: WWD Celebration

International development cooperation and assistance (Strategy 4.5)

62.    Two funding mechanisms exist within the Secretariat to support the implementation of the Convention in-country. They are respectively the Swiss Grant for Africa (average CHF 150,000 per year for 47 CPs) and the Small Grant Funds programme, which provides funds every year (maximum CHF 40,000) for a project in one of the 47 CPs. If we compare with other MEAs like UNCCD and CBD which have a funding mechanism such as the GEF with billions of dollars to assist their countries in the implementation of their conventions, one must recognize these two existing funding mechanisms for the implementation of the Convention are just not enough. That’s why at COP9 we asked African CPs to try as much as they could to mobilize support from development assistance agencies for in-country wetland conservation. The COP10 results show us that 15 CPs (38%) have mobilized funding support from development assistance agencies for in-country Convention implementation. This leaves us with 32 CPs that have to fill the gap. The priority for the next triennium must be for the Secretariat to go beyond its collaboration with ministries of environment of developed countries CPs and establish working relationships with their development agencies (USAID, CIDA, DANIDA, AFD, JICA, DGIS, BTC, DFID, etc.) in order to secure funding for the convention implementation at national level in Africa.


Figure 11: Mobilization of funding support from development agencies for in-country activities

Annual contributions (Strategy 4.6)

63.    Seventeen CPs (44%) indicated in the National Reports that they have paid their dues to Ramsar in full and in a timely manner since COP9. However, the membership dues database information maintained by the Secretariat shows that about one-third of the Africa CPs have never paid their Ramsar dues since their accession to the Convention. For some CPs this is a period of up to 15 years; the contributions have not been paid in spite of the reminders sent to them and visits to the Permanent Missions in Geneva. This does not only concern least-developed countries on the DAC list, as 7 of the 10 oil-producing countries in Africa that are Parties to the Convention still have arrears in their contribution to the Convention budget. This is still not acceptable, and much greater efforts are needed by African CPs to comply with their commitments. The Secretariat has started a debt collection process which consists of getting in direct contact with the ministers to make sure that they understand the challenges behind the payment of dues to Ramsar.


Fig 12. Payment of annual contribution

Using National Reports to monitor the implementation of the Convention (Strategy 4.7)

64.    The COP9 and 10 designs of National Reports represent an excellent tool for the planning and monitoring of the implementation of the Convention’s Strategic Plan at national level as they are articulated around its main goals and objectives. Even though only thirteen CPs (33%) indicated that they have used their COP9 National Reports in monitoring the in-country implementation of the Convention, the trend highlighted in the responses of the CPs that “planned” to use the NR in monitoring the implementation of the convention is a good indication that we are on the right path to make the NR a management tool for the Convention in-country (14 CPs – 36%). One suggestion to improve the use of NRs to monitor the implementation of the Convention is to initiate a voluntary mid-term review between two COPs articulated around the same indicators included in the NR.

National Ramsar Committees (Strategy 4.8)

65.    Following Recommendation 5.13 of COP5 (1993), 22 CPs (56%) have established their Ramsar National Committees (NRC). If we compare this with the situation 3 years ago, where only 16 CPs had established their NRCs, one could consider that there has been some improvement regarding the implementation of this strategic objective of the Convention. However, we also have to admit that once established there appears to be no sustainability in the functioning of these committees, as they generally have no funding for their activities in spite of the very crucial role they can play in coordinating and organizing the implementation of the Convention at national level with the participation of all interested stakeholders to avoid that only “wetlands people” sit together and ignore the concerns of the other actors.

66.    To address this issue, the Secretariat has started a pilot project with Mali which, if successful, can be extended to other CPs that have no funding for their functioning. Our priority for the next triennium would be to have at least 75% of the Africa CPs with an operational NRC that will bring together all the interested actors such as representatives of IOPs in the country and, the focal points of the biodiversity related MEAs (Ramsar, CCD, CBD, CMS, CITES, AEWA, etc.

Working with the International Organization Partners (Strategy 4.9)

67.    For the Africa region, there is clear evidence that the IOPs play a role of paramount importance in supporting CPs in the implementation of the Convention at the national and regional levels. This is reflected in the rate of positive responses (28 CPs – 72%) to whether the CPs have received assistance from one or more of the Convention IOPs in the implementation of the Convention. In addition to the binary questions, some countries have even indicated that IOPs or similar bodies are part of their National Ramsar Committee. However, we have to recognize that not all the Convention IOPs have been very active in assisting both the Ramsar Secretariat and the Contracting Parties in implementing the Convention. According to the comments made by CPs and observations by the Africa Unit team of the Convention, WWF has been the most active IOP in helping the CPs particularly for the designation of new Ramsar sites in almost all the subregions of Africa. Then comes Wetlands International with the implementation of Resolution VIII.14 on wetlands management and poverty reduction through the WPRP (Wetlands and Poverty Reduction Project), even though the project partners are not always the Ramsar Administrative Authorities but in some cases NGOs. Some CPs reported the important role played by Birdlife International in bird counting and some Ramsar Advisory Missions. IWMI and IUCN have been less active IOPs in helping with the implementation of the Convention both at the Secretariat (Africa region) and national levels as reported by CPs in the COP10 NRs.

68.    We believe that it’s time now that we sit again with each of the IOPs and discuss a joint plan of action to assist CPs in the implementation of the Convention.


Figure 13: Receiving support from IOPs

Wetland training needs (Strategy 4.10)

69.    On the basis of the different answers given by the CPs that have completed their National Reports, it is clear that lack of capacity and training represent some major limitations in the Convention’s implementation in Africa. Only 5 CPs (13% against 8% at COP9) have assessed their training and capacity development needs. Identifying training needs of institutions and individuals, particularly in Africa, and delivering appropriate responses, remain vital elements to reinforce the capacities for wetland conservation and wise use.

The Secretariat in collaboration with UNEP-DELC was able to organize back to back with the last regional preparatory meeting (Yaounde, Cameroon, November 2007) a training workshop on COPs and other multilateral negotiation techniques. However, this experience needs to be widened at the regional level to provide those in charge of Convention implementation in the field with the appropriate tools and understanding to allow them to handle some of the key wetland issues such as fundraising, policy development and implementation, legislative review, wetland inventories, wetland management and other topics relevant to the implementation of the Convention. Finally, it is worth noting that the Africa Unit has collaborated with Atelier Technique des Espaces Naturels (ATEN) of the French Ministry of Environment in developing a handbook/module to elaborate on the capacities of the Convention Focal Points from French-speaking countries in their daily role in the implementation of the Convention in Africa. This document will be launched at COP10 in Korea and will later be translated for Anglophone countries.


Figure 14: Wetlands training needs assessment


Annex 1
A. African Sites designated since COP9*

List of African Ramsar sites designated from 8 November 2005 to 15 July 2008

  • No. of Sites: 89
  • Total Surface Area: 32,734,529 hectares
  • Information valid for 15 September 2005 to 15 July 2008

Ramsar Site No.

Site Name

Country

Designation Date

Surface Area

1668

 Site Ramsar du Complexe W

BENIN

02-02-2007

895480

1669

 Zone Humide de la Rivière Pendjari

BENIN

02-02-2007

144774

1609

 Waza Logone Floodplain

CAMEROON

20-03-2006

600000

1643

 Barombi Mbo Crater Lake

CAMEROON

08-10-2006

415

1739

 Partie camerounaise du fleuve Sangha

CAMEROON

02-02-2008

6200

1590

 Les Rivières de Mbaéré-Bodingué

CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC

05-12-2005

101300

1621

 Plaines d’inondation des Bahr Aouk et Salamat

CHAD

01-05-2006

4922000

1560

 Plaines d’inondation du Logone et les dépressions Toupouri

CHAD

14-11-2005

2978900

1561

 Réserve de faune de Binder-Léré

CHAD

14-11-2005

135000

1649

 Le Karthala

COMOROS

12-11-2006

13000

1650

 Le Mont Ntringui

COMOROS

12-11-2006

3000

1740

 Cayo-Loufoualeba

CONGO

13-12-2007

15366

1741

 Conkouati-Douli

CONGO

13-12-2

504950

1742

 Grands affluents

CONGO

13-12-2007

5908074

1743

 Libenga

CONGO

13-12-2007

59409

1581

Complexe Sassandra-Dagbego

 COTE DIVOIRE

18-10-2005

10551

1582

Fresco

 COTE DIVOIRE

18-10-2005

15507

1583

Grand Bassam

 COTE DIVOIRE

18-10-2005

40210

1584

 Iles Ehotilé-Essouman

 COTE DIVOIRE

18-10-2005

27274

1585

 N’Ganda N’Ganda

 COTE DIVOIRE

18-10-2005

14402

1652

 Parc National Akanda

GABON

02-02-2007

54000

1653

 Parc National Pongara

GABON

02-02-2007

92969

1654

 Site Ramsar des Monts Birougou

GABON

02-02-2007

536800

1657

 Tanbi Wetlands Complex

GAMBIA

02-02-2007

6304

1579

 Gambie-Oundou-Liti

GUINEA

14-11-2005

527400

1719

 Bafing-Falémé

GUINEA

16-10-2007

517300

1720

 Bafing-Source

GUINEA

16-10-2007

317200

1578

 Gambie-Koulountou

GUINEA

14-11-2005

281400

1629

 Kpatawee Wetlands

LIBERIA

24-08-2006

835

1630

 Marshall Wetlands

LIBERIA

24-08-2006

12168

1628

 Gbedin Wetlands

LIBERIA

24-08-2006

25

1631

 Mesurado Wetlands

LIBERIA

24-08-2006

6760

1686

 Zones humides de Bedo

MADAGASCAR

12-05-2007

1962

1744

 Blue Bay Marine Park

MAURITIUS

31-01-2008

353

1492

La Mare de Dan Doutchi

NIGER

16-09-2005

25366

1493

La Mare de Lassouri

NIGER

16-09-2005

26737

1494

La Mare de Tabalak

NIGER

16-09-2005

7713

1495

Oasis du Kawar

NIGER

16-09-2005

368536

1501

Gueltas et Oasis de l’Aïr

NIGER

16-09-2005

2413237

1749

 Lake Chad Wetlands in Nigeria

NIGERIA

30-04-2008

607354

1751

 Apoi Creek Forests

NIGERIA

30-04-2008

29213

1752

 Baturiya Wetland

NIGERIA

30-04-2008

101095

1753

 Dagona Sanctuary Lake

NIGERIA

30-04-2008

344

1754

 Foge Islands

NIGERIA

30-04-2008

4229

1755

 Lower Kaduna-Middle Niger Floodplain

NIGERIA

30-04-2008

229054

1756

 Maladumba Lake

NIGERIA

30-04-2008

1860

1757

 Oguta Lake

NIGERIA

30-04-2008

572

1758

 Pandam and Wase Lakes

NIGERIA

30-04-2008

19742

1759

 Upper Orashi Forests

NIGERIA

30-04-2008

25165

1632

 Ilots Tinhosas

SAO TOME AND PRINCIPE

21-08-2006

23

1687

 Makuleke Wetlands

SOUTH AFRICA

22-05-2007

7757

1688

 Prince Edward Islands

SOUTH AFRICA

22-05-2007

37500

1622

 Sudd

SUDAN

05-06-2006

5700000

1721

 Bassin versant Oti-Mandouri

TOGO

02-02-2008

425000

1722

 Zones Humides du Littoral du Togo

TOGO

02-02-2008

591000

1702

 Djerba Ras Rmel

TUNISIA

07-11-2007

1856

1703

 Garaet Sidi Mansour

TUNISIA

07-11-2007

2426

1704

 Iles Kneiss avec leurs zones intertidales

TUNISIA

07-11-2007

22027

1705

 Lac et tourbière de Mejen Ech Chitan

TUNISIA

07-11-2007

7

1706

 Lagune de Ghar el Melh et Delta de la Mejerda

TUNISIA

07-11-2007

10168

1707

 Lagunes du Cap Bon oriental

TUNISIA

07-11-2007

504

1708

 Les Tourbières de Dar Fatma

TUNISIA

07-11-2007

13

1709

 Salines de Thyna

TUNISIA

07-11-2007

3343

1710

 Sebkhet Kelbia

TUNISIA

07-11-2007

8732

1711

 Sebkhet Noual

TUNISIA

11-07-2007

17060

1712

 Sebkhet Sejoumi

TUNISIA

07-11-2007

2979

1713

 Sebkhet Soliman

TUNISIA

07-11-2007

880

1714

 Zones humides oasiennes de Kebili

TUNISIA

07-11-2007

2419

1700

 Djerba Bin El Ouedian

TUNISIA

07-11-2007

12082

1701

 Djerba Guellala

TUNISIA

07-11-2007

2285

1696

 Ain Dahab

TUNISIA

07-11-2007

560

1699

 Chott El Jerid

TUNISIA

07-11-2007

586187

1697

 Bahiret el Bibane

TUNISIA

07-11-2007

39266

1698

 Barrage Lebna

TUNISIA

07-11-2007

1147

1640

 Murchison Falls-Albert Delta Wetland System

UGANDA

15-09-2006

17293

1633

 Lake Bisina Wetland System

UGANDA

15-09-2006

54229

1634

 Lake Mburo-Nakivali Wetland System

UGANDA

15-09-2006

26834

1638

 Mabamba Bay Wetland System

UGANDA

15-09-2006

2424

1641

 Sango Bay-Musambwa Island-Kagera Wetland Sustem (SAMUKA)

UGANDA

15-09-2006

55110

1635

 Lake Nakuwa Wetland System

UGANDA

15-09-2006

91150

1637

 Lutembe Bay Wetland System

UGANDA

15-09-2006

98

1639

 Nabajjuzi Wetland system

UGANDA

15-09-2006

1753

1636

 Lake Opeta Wetland System

UGANDA

15-09-2006

68912

1660

 Luangwa Flood Plains

ZAMBIA

02-02-2007

250000

1671

 Tanganyika

ZAMBIA

02-02-2007

230000

1661

 Mweru wa Ntipa

ZAMBIA

02-02-2007

490000

1662

 Zambezi Floodplains

ZAMBIA

02-02-2007

900000

1659

 Busanga Swamps

ZAMBIA

02-02-2007

200000

1580

Lukanga Swamps

ZAMBIA

08-11-2005

260000

* At the date of the 15th of July 2008

B. New site designations in progress

List of African sites proposed for future designation (Ref date: 31 July 2008)

No.

Country

Name of the site

Area (ha)

1

Benin

Zone humide de la Magou

56,768

2

Benin

Zone humide de la Mare Bali

33,190

3

Burkina Faso

Le lac Higa

300

4

Burkina Faso

La Forêt Classée et Réserve Partielle de Faune de la Comoé Léraba

125,000

5

Burkina Faso

La Vallée du Sourou

615,000

6

Burkina Faso

Lac Dem

1354

7

Burkina Faso

Cône d’épandage de Banh

150,000

8

Burkina Faso

Barrage de Bagré

21,611

9

Burkina Faso

Le Lac Bam

2,693

10

Burkina Faso

Parc National D’arly

119,503

11

Burkina Faso

Barrage De La Kompienga

9,544

12

Burkina Faso

Le barrage de la Tapoa

622

13

Burkina Faso

Lac de Tingrela

364

14

Burkina Faso

Mare aux roussettes de Léra (Forêt Galerie de Léra: is the new site name in the latest version)

200

15

Burundi

La Rivière Akanyaru

14,600

16

Burundi

La Rivière Ruvyironza.

101

17

Burundi

Lac Rweru

7,000

18

Burundi

Lac Cohoha-Sud.

5,800

19

Burundi

Malagarazi

14,000

20

Burundi

Parc National de la Ruvubu

50,000

21

Burundi

Lac Rwihinda « Lac aux oiseaux ».

9,200

22

Burundi

Lac Tanganyika partie Burundaise

263,200

23

Central Africa Republic

Le Parc Manovo-Ngounda-Saint Floris

1,740,000

24

Chad

Plaine de Massenya

2,526,000

25

Comores

Le Parc National de Moheli

48,132

26

DRC

Ngiri-Tumba-Maindombe

6,569,624

27

Equatorial Guinea

Lago de Moka

-

28

Equatorial Guinea

Praderas de Bome

-

29

Equatorial Guinea

Praderas de Utonde

-

30

Equatorial Guinea

Rio Woro

-

31

Gabon

Bas Ogooue

1,370,000

32

Gabon

Chutes Et Rapides Sur L’ivindo

60,000

33

Gabon

Rapides De Mboungou Badouma Et De Doumé

54,000

34

Gambia

Niumi National Park

4,940

35

Guinea-Bissau

Parc Naturel des Mangroves du Fleuve Cacheu

80,000

36

Guinea-Bissau

Parc National Marin João Vieira et Poilão

49,500

37

Guinea-Bissau

Parc National des Groupe d’Iles de l’Orango

158,479

38

Guinea-Bissau

Les îles d’ Unhocomo et Unhoomozinho

-

39

Malawi

Lake Malawi

2,440,000

40

Mauritania

Gaat de Sawana/ Tamourt Oum Lelli

1,400?

41

Mauritania

Tamourt de Chlim

500

42

Mauritania

Gaat de Mahmouda

16,200

43

Mauritania

Lac Gabou

9500

44

Mozambique

Coastal Zone of the Niassa Lake

1,265,700

45

Nigeria

Chingurmi-Duguma Flood plain

1,500

46

Nigeria

 Ibom/ River Cross Estuaries

60,000

47

Nigeria

Wawan Rafi Wetland

-

48

Nigeria

Akassa Coastal Wetlands

7,900

49

Seychelles

Mare aux Cochons upland wetlands

-

50

Seychelles

Plaine Hollandaise upland wetland

-

51

Sudan

Dongonab Bay-Marsa Waiai

280,000

52

Sudan

Suakin-Gulf of Agig

1,125,000

53

Sudan

Jebel Bawzer Forest (Sunut Forest)

1,234

54

Uganda

Rwenzori Mountains Ramsar Site

22,400


Annex 2. Updating of Ramsar Information Sheets in process

A. List of Sites for which RISs have been sent for update

No.

Country

N° by desig

Name of the site

Date of designation dd/mm/yy

Area (ha)

1

Benin

1018

Basse Vallée de l’Ouémé

24/10/00

91,600; now proposing 501,620

2

Benin

1017

Basse vallée du Couffo

24/01/00

47500; now proposing 43,213

3

Burkina Faso

491

La Mare aux hippopotames

27/06/90

19,200

4

Burkina Faso

490

Mare d’Oursi

27/06/90

45000; update proposes 1595 ha

5

Burkina Faso

492

Le Parc National Du W

27/06/90

235,000

6

Burundi

1180

Delta de la Rusizi de la Réserve Naturelle de la Rusizi et la partie nord de la zone littorale du lac Tanganyika

05/10/02

1,000

7

Central Africa Republic

1590

Les rivieres de Mbaere-Bodingue

05/12/05

101,300

8

Chad

1134

Partie tchadienne du lac Tchad

11/01/02

1,648,168

9

Congo

950

Réserve Communautaire du Lac Télé/Likoula-aux-Herbes.

18/06/98

438,960

10

Djibouti

1239

Haramous-Loyada

22/11/02

3,000

11

Gambia

860

Bao bolon Wetland Reserve

16/09/96

21,900

12

Mauritius

1094

Rivulet Terre Rouge Estuary Bird Sanctuary

30/05/01

26

13

South Africa

35

Barberspan

12/03/75

3,118

14

South Africa

343

Blesbokspruit

02/10/86

1,858

15

South Africa

34

De Hoop Vlei

12/03/75

750

16

South Africa

342

De Mond (Heuningnes Estuary)

02/10/86

918

17

South Africa

952

Nylsvley Nature Reserve

07/07/98

3,970

18

South Africa

526

Orange River Mouth

28/06/91

2,000

19

South Africa

525

Verlorenvlei

28/06/91

1,500

20

South Africa

1110

Verloren Valei Nature Reserve

16/10/01

5,891

21

Tunisia

213

Ichkeul

24/11/80

12,600


B. General List of Sites that Require Updated RIS Data: 


No.

Country & year of accession

Total No. of Ramsar sites

No. of sites needing updating

Name of sites with missing/outdated information

1

Algeria / Algérie / Argelia (1984)

42

10

Chott Ech Chergui (02/02/01), Chott El Hodna (02/02/01), Chott Merrouane et Oued Khrouf (02/02/01), Complexe de zones humides de la plaine de Guerbes-Sanhadja (02/02/01), La Vallée d’Iherir (02/02/01), Les Gueltates d’Issakarassene (02/02/01), Marais de la Macta (02/02/01), Oasis de Ouled Saïd, (02/02/01), Oasis de Tamantit et Sid Ahmed Timmi (02/02/01) et Sebkha d’Oran (02/02/01),

2

Benin / Bénin (2000)

4

2

Basse Vallée de l’Ouémé, Lagune de Porto-Novo, Lac Nokoué (24/01/00) et Basse Vallée du Couffo, Lagune Côtiere, Chenal Aho, Lac Ahémé (24/01/00)

3

Botswana (1997)

1

0

NA

4

Burkina Faso (1990)

3

3

La Mare aux hippopotames (27/06/90), La Mare d’Oursi (27/06/90) et Parc National du W (27/06/90)

5

Burundi (2002)

1

1

Delta de la Rusizi de la Réserve Naturelle de la Rusizi et la partie nord de la zone littorale du lac Tanganyika (05/06/02). Nous attendons toujours la réponse à nos commentaires sur la FDR concernant la mise à jour du site.

6

Cameroon / Cameroun / Camerún (2006)

3

0

 NA

7

Cape Verde / Cap-Vert / Cabo Verde (2005)

3

3

Curral Velho (18/07/05), Lagoa de Pedra Badejo (18/07/05) et Lagoa de Rabil (18/07/05). Veuillez noter que nous n’avons jamais reçu des FDR, ni des cartes pour ces 3 sites depuis leur inscription.

8

Central African Republic / République Centrafricaine / República Centroafricana (2006)

1

1

Les rivières de Mbaéré-Bodingué (05/12/05). Veuillez noter que nous n’avons jamais reçu la FDR, ni une carte appropriée pour ce site depuis son inscription.

9

Chad / Tchad (1990)

5

2

Lac Fitri (13/06/90) et Partie tchadienne du lac Tchad (14/08/01).

10

Comoros / Comores / Comoras (1995)

3

1

Lac Dziani Boudouni (09/02/95).

11

Congo (1998)

5

1

Réserve Communautaire du Lac Télé/Likouala-aux-Herbes (18/06/98). Nous attendons votre réponse à nos commentaires sur la dernière version du FDR reçu pour la mise à jour de ce site.

12

Côte d’Ivoire (1996)

6

0

 NA

13

Democratic Republic of Congo / République démocratique du Congo / República Democrática del Congo (1996)

2

2

Parc national des Mangroves (18/01/96) et Parc national des Virunga (18/01/96)

14

Djibouti (2003)

1

0

NA

15

Egypt / Egypte / Egipto (1988)

2

2

Lake Bardawil (09/09/88) and Lake Burullus. (09/09/88).

16

Equatorial Guinea / Guinée Équatoriale / Guinea Ecuatorial (2003)

3

3

Isla de Annobón (02/06/03), Reserva Natural del Estuario del Muni (02/06/03) et Río Ntem o Campo (02/06/03).

17

Gabon (1987)

6

0

NA

18

Gambia / Gambie (1997)

2

1

Baobolon Wetland Reserve (16/09/96)

19

Ghana (1988)

6

6

Anlo-Keta lagoon complex (14/08/92), Densu delta (14/08/92), Muni Lagoon (14/08/92), Sakumo Lagoon (14/08/92), Songor Lagoon (14/08/92) and Owabi (22/02/88).

20

Guinea / Guinée (1993)

16

6

Ile Alcatraz (18/11/92), Ile Blanche (23/06/93), Iles Tristao (18/11/92), Konkouré (18/11/92), Rio Kapatchez (18/11/92) et Rio Pongo (18/11/92).

21

Guinea-Bissau / Guinée-Bissau (1990)

1

1

Lagoa de Cufada (14/05/90).

22

Kenya (1990)

5

1

Lake Bogoria (27/08/01).

23

Lesotho (2004)

1

0

 NA

24

Liberia / Libéria (2003)

5

0

 NA

25

Libyan Arab Jamahiriya / Jamahiriya arabe libyenne / Jamahiriya Arabe Libia (2000)

2

2

Ain Elshakika (05/04/00) and Ain Elzarga (05/04/00).

26

Madagascar (1999)

6

1

Complexe des lacs de Manambolomaty (25/09/98),

27

Malawi (1997)

1

1

Lake Chilwa (14/11/96)

28

Mali (1987)

1

0

 NA

29

Mauritania / Mauritanie (1983)

3

3

Banc d’Arguin (22/10/82), Chat Tboul (10/11/00) et Parc National du Diawling (23/08/94).

30

Mauritius / Maurice / Mauricio (2001)

2

1

Rivulet Terre Rouge Estuary Bird Sanctuary (30/05/01)

31

Morocco / Maroc / Marruecos (1980)

24

0

 NA

32

Mozambique (2004)

1

0

 NA

33

Namibia / Namibie (1995)

4

4

Etosha Pan, Lake Oponono & Cuvelai drainage (23/08/95), Orange River Mouth (23/08/95), Sandwich Harbour (23/08/95) and Walvis Bay (23/08/95).

34

Niger / Níger (1987)

12

2

Complexe Kokorou-Namga (17/06/01) et Lac Tchad (17/06/01),

35

Nigeria / Nigéria (2001)

11

1

Nguru Lake (and Marma Channel) complex (02/10/00).

36

Rwanda (2006)

1

1

Rugezi-Bulera-Ruhondo (01/12/05). Nous n’avons jamais reçu une FDR, ni une carte acceptable pour ce site. Nous attendons toujours la réponse à nos commentaires fait sur la premier version de la FDR et carte reçu.

37

Sao Tome and Principe (2006)

1

1

Ilots Tinhosas (21/08/06).

38

Senegal / Sénégal (1977)

4

4

Bassin du Ndiael (11/07/77), Delta du Saloum (03/04/84), Djoudj (11/07/77) et Gueumbeul (29/09/86). Les dernières versions des FDRs ont été reçues en 1992.

39

Seychelles (2005)

1

0

 NA

40

Sierra Leone / Sierra Leona (2000)

1

1

Sierra Leone River Estuary (13/12/99).

41

South Africa / Afrique du Sud / Sudáfrica (1975)

19

17

Barberspan (12/03/75), Blesbokspruit (02/10/86), De Hoop Vlei (12/03/75), De Mond (Heuningnes Estuary) (02/10/86), Kosi Bay (28/06/91), Lake Sibaya (28/06/91), Langebaan (25/04/88), Natal Drakensberg Park (21/01/97), Ndumo Game Reserve (21/01/97), Nylsvley Nature Reserve (07/07/98), Orange River Mouth (28/06/91), St. Lucia System (02/10/86), Seekoeivlei Nature Reserve (21/01/97), Turtle Beaches/Coral Reefs of Tongaland (02/10/86), Verloren Valei Nature Reserve (16/10/01), Verlorenvlei (28/06/91) and Wilderness Lakes (28/06/91).

42

Sudan / Soudan / Sudán (2005)

2

0

 NA

43

Togo (1995)

4

2

Parc national de la Keran (04/07/95) et Reserve de faune de Togodo (04/07/95).

44

Tunisia / Tunisie / Túnez(1981)

20

1

Ichkeul (24/11/80).

45

Uganda / Ouganda (1988)

11

1

Lake George (04/03/88).

46

United Republic of Tanzania / République-Unie de Tanzanie / República-Unida de Tanzanía (2000)

4

1

Lake Natron Basin (04/07/01) and Malagarasi-Muyovozi Wetlands (13/04/00).

47

Zambia / Zambie (1991)

8

0

 NA

 

total

270

90

 

For reasons of economy, this document is printed in a limited number, and will not be distributed at the meeting. Delegates are requested to bring their copies to the meeting and not to request additional copies.

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